view pdf winform c# : Add links to pdf file Library software API .net winforms azure sharepoint WittgensteinInvestigations7-part1307

i34
e
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
465.  "An  expectation  is  so  made  that  whatever  happens has to
accord  with it,  or  not."
Suppose you now ask:  then are facts  defined one way or the other
by an expectation—that is, is it defined for whatever event may occur
whether it fulfils the expectation or not?  The answer has to be: "Yes,
unless  the  expression  of  the  expectation  is  indefinite;  for  example,
contains a disjunction  of different possibilities."
466.  What  does  man  think  for?  What  use  is  it?—Why  does  he
make boilers according to calculations and not leave  the thickness  of
their  walls  to  chance?  After all it  is  only  a  fact  of experience  that
boilers do not explode so often if made according to these calculations.
But just as having once been burnt he would do anything rather than
put  his  hand  into  a  fire,  so  he  would  do  anything  rather  than  not
calculate  for  a boiler.—But as  we  are  not interested  in  causes,—we
shall say: human beings do in fact think: this, for instance, is how they
proceed when they make  a boiler.—Now,  can't a boiler produced in
this way explode?  Oh, yes.
467.  Does  man  think,  then,  because  he  has  found  that  thinking
pays?—Because he thinks it advantageous to think?
(Does he bring his  children up because he has found it pays?)
468.  What would shew why he thinks?
469.  And  yet  one  can  say  that  thinking  has  been  found  to  pay.
That  there  are  fewer  boiler  explosions  than  formerly,  now  that  we
no  longer  go  by  feeling  in  deciding the  thickness  of the  walls,  but
make  such-and-such  calculations  instead.  Or  since  each  calculation
done by one engineer got checked by a second one.
470.  So we do sometimes think because it has been found to pay.
471.  It often happens that we only become aware of the important
facts, if we suppress the question "why?"; and then in the course of
our investigations these facts lead us to an answer.
472.  The  character  of the  belief in  the  uniformity  of nature  can
perhaps  be  seen most  clearly  in the case in which we fear what we
expect.  Nothing  could  induce  me  to  put  my  hand  into  a flame—
although after all it is only in the past that I have burnt myself.
473.  The  belief that fire will burn  me  is  of the same  kind as  the
fear that it will burn  me.
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS
1356
474.  I shall get burnt if I put my hand in the fire: that is certainty.
That is to say: here we see the meaning of certainty.  (What it amounts
to, not just the meaning  of the word  "certainty.")
475.  On  being  asked  for  the  grounds  of a  supposition,  one be-
thinks oneself of them. Does the same thing happen here as when one
considers what may have been the causes of an event?
476.  We  should  distinguish  between  the  object  of fear  and  the
cause of fear.
Thus  a face  which  inspires  fear  or  delight  (the  object  of  fear  or
delight),  is  not  on  that  account  its  cause,  but—one  might  say—its
target.
477.  "Why  do  you  believe  that  you  will  burn  yourself  on  the
hot-plate?"—Have  you  reasons  for  this  belief;  and  do  you  need
reasons?
478.  What  kind  of reason  have  I  to  assume  that my  finger will
feel a resistance when it touches  the  table?  What kind of reason  to
believe that it will hurt if this pencil pierces my hand?—When I ask
this,  a hundred reasons present themselves, each drowning the voice
of the  others.  "But I  have experienced  it myself innumerable  times,
and as  often heard of similar experiences;  if it were not so, it would
.. . . . . . ;  etc."
479.  The question: "On what grounds do you believe this?" might
mean:  "From what you are now deducing it  (have you just deduced
it)?"  But  it  might  also  mean:  "What  grounds  can you produce for
this assumption on thinking it over?"
480.  Thus  one  could  in  fact  take  "grounds"  for  an  opinion  to
mean only what a man had said to himself before  he  arrived  at  the
opinion.  The  calculation  that  he  has  actually carried  out.  If  it  is
now  asked:  But  how can   previous  experience  be  a  ground  for
assuming  that  such-and-such  will  occur  later  on?—the  answer  is:
What general concept have we of grounds for this kind of assumption?
This sort of statement about the past is simply what we call a ground
for  assuming  that  this  will  happen  in  the  future.—And  if you  are
surprised  at our playing such a game I refer you to the effect of a past
experience  (to the fact that a burnt child fears the fire).
Add links to pdf file - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
chrome pdf from link; add links to pdf in acrobat
Add links to pdf file - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding hyperlinks to pdf documents; adding links to pdf in preview
136*
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
481.  If  anyone  said  that  information  about  the  past  could  not
convince him that something would happen in the future, I  should not
understand him.  One might ask him: What do you expect to be told,
then?  What sort of information do you call a ground for such a belief?
What do you  call  "conviction"?  In  what kind  of way do  you expect
to be convinced?—If these  are not grounds, then what are grounds?—
If you say these are not grounds, then you must surely be able to state
what  must be the case for us  to have the right to say that there are
grounds for our assumption.
For note:  here  grounds  are not propositions which logically imply
what is believed.
Not that one can say: less is needed for belief than for knowledge.—
For  the  question  here  is  not  one  of  an  approximation  to  logical
inference.
482.  We  are  misled  by  this  way  of  putting  it:  "This  is  a  good
ground, for  it makes  the occurrence  of the  event  probable."  That  is
as  if  we  had  asserted  something  further  about  the  ground,  which
justified it  as a ground;  whereas  to  say  that  this  ground  makes  the
occurrence probable is to say nothing except that this ground comes up
to  a  particular  standard  of good  grounds—but  the  standard  has  no
grounds  1
483.  A good ground is one that looks like this.
484.  One would like to say:  "It is a good ground only because it
makes the occurrence really probable".  Because it, so to speak, really
has an influence on the event; as it were an experiential one.
485.  Justification by experience comes to an end.  If it did  not it
would not be justification.
486.  Does  it follow  from  the sense-impressions  which  I  get  that
there is a chair over there?—How can a proposition  follow from sense-
impressions?  Well, does it follow from the propositions which describe
the  sense-impressions?  No.—But  don't  I  infer  that  a  chair is  there
from impressions, from sense-data?—I make no inference 1—and yet I
sometimes do.  I see a photograph for example, and say "There must
have been a chair over there" or again "From what I can see here I infer
that there  is  a chair over  there."  That is  an  inference;  but  not  one
belonging to logic.  An inference is a transition to an assertion; and so
also to the behaviour that corresponds  to the assertion.  'I draw  the
consequences' not only in words, but also in action.
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I 
i
37
e
Was  I justified in drawing  these  consequences?  What is called  a
justification here?—How is  the word "justification" used?  Describe
language-games. From these you will also be able to see the importance
of being justified.
487.  "I am leaving the room because you tell me to."
"I am leaving the room, but not because you tell me to."
Does this proposition describe  a connexion between my action and his
order; or does it make the connexion?
Can one ask:  "How do you know that you do it because of this, or
not because of this?"  And is the answer perhaps:  "I feel it"?
488.  How do I judge whether it is so?  By circumstantial evidence?
489.  Ask yourself: On what occasion, for what purpose, do we say
this?
What kind of actions accompany these words?  (Think of a greeting.)
In what scenes will they be used; and what for?
490.  How  do  I  know  that this line of thought  has  led  me  to  this
action?—Well, it is a particular picture: for example, of a calculation
leading to a further experiment in  an experimental investigation.  It
looks  like this—— and now I could describe an example.
491.  Not:  "without  language  we  could  not  communicate  with
one another"—but for sure:  without  language  we  cannot  influence
other people in such-and-such ways; cannot build roads and machines,
etc. .  And also: without the use  of speech and writing people could
not  communicate.
492.  To invent a language could mean to invent an instrument for
a particular purpose on the basis of the laws of nature (or consistently
with them); but it also has the other sense, analogous to that in which
we speak of the invention of a game.
Here  I  am  stating  something  about  the  grammar  of  the  word
"language", by connecting it with the grammar of the word  "invent".
493.  We say: "The cock calls the hens by crowing"—but doesn't a
comparison  with  our  language  lie  at the  bottom  of this?—Isn't  the
aspect  quite  altered  if  we  imagine  the  crowing  to  set  the  hens  in
motion by some kind of physical causation?
But if it were shewn how the words "Come to me" act on the person
addressed, so that finally, given certain conditions, the muscles  of his
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
HTML converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to Add necessary references
clickable links in pdf; add links pdf document
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. metadata adding control, you can add some additional information to generated PDF file.
convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks; pdf link to specific page
I?
8e 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
legs are innervated, and so  on—should we feel  that that sentence lost
the character of a sentence?
494.  I want to  say:  It is primarily  the  apparatus  of our ordinary
language, of our word-language, that we call language; and then other
things by analogy or comparability with this.
495.  Clearly, I can establish by experience that a human being (or
animal) reacts to one sign as I want him to, and to another not.  That,
e.g.,  a  human  being  goes  to  the  right  at  the  sign  "  ———*• "  and
goes to the left  at  the  sign  " •<———   ";  but  that  he  does  not  react
to the sign "  0——|  ", as to "  «———  ".
 do  not  even  need  to  fabricate  a  case,  I  only  have  to  consider
what is in fact the case; namely, that I can direct a man who has learned
only  German,  only  by  using  the  German  language.  (For  here  I  am
looking at learning German as adjusting a mechanism to respond to a
certain kind of influence; and it may be all one to us whether someone
else has learned the language, or was perhaps from birth constituted to
react  to sentences  in  German like  a normal person who has  learned
German.)
496.  Grammar does not tell us how language must be constructed
in order to fulfil its purpose, in order to have such-and-such an effect
on human beings.  It only describes and in no way explains the use of
signs.
497.  The  rules  of grammar may be called  "arbitrary",  if that is to
mean that the aim  of the grammar is nothing but that of the language.
If someone says "If our language had not this grammar, it could not
express these facts"—it should be asked what "could" means here.
498.  When I say that the orders "Bring me sugar" and "Bring me
milk" make sense, but not the combination "Milk me sugar", that does
not mean that the utterance of this combination of words has no effect.
And if its effect is that the other person stares at me and gapes, I don't
on  that account  call  it the  order  to stare  and  gape, even  if that was
precisely the effect that I wanted to produce.
499.  To say "This combination of words makes no sense" excludes
it  from  the  sphere  of language  and  thereby bounds  the  domain  of
language.  But  when  one  draws  a  boundary  it  may  be  for  various
kinds of reason.  If I surround an area with a fence or a line or other-
wise,  the purpose  may be  to prevent  someone from  getting in  or out;
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I 
i
39
e
but it may also be part of a game and the players be supposed, say, to
jump over the boundary;  or  it may shew where  the  property of one
man ends and that of another begins; and so on.  So if I draw a boun-
dary line that is not yet to say what I am drawing it for.
500.  When a  sentence is  called  senseless,  it  is  not as  it  were  its
sense that is senseless.  But a combination of words is being excluded
from the language, withdrawn from circulation.
501.  "The  purpose  of  language  is  to  express  thoughts."—So
presumably  the  purpose  of every  sentence  is  to  express  a thought.
Then  what thought is  expressed,  for example,  by the  sentence  "It's
raining"?—
502.  Asking what the sense is.  Compare:
"This sentence makes  sense."—"What sense?"
"This  set of words is  a  sentence."—"What  sentence?"
503.  If I give anyone an order I feel it to be quite enough to give him
signs.  And I should never say: this is only words, and I have got to get
behind  the words.  Equally,  when I  have  asked  someone  something
and he gives me an answer (i.e. a sign) I am content—that was what I
expected—and I  don't raise the objection:  but that's  a mere answer.
504.  But if you say:  "How am I to know what he means,  when
I see nothing but the signs he gives?" then I say: "How is he to know
what he means, when he has nothing but the signs either?"
505.  Must I understand an order before I can act on it?—Certainly,
otherwise you wouldn't know what you had to do!—But isn't there in
turn a jump from knowing  to doing?—
506.  The  absent-minded  man  who  at  the  order  "Right  turn!"
turns left, and then, clutching his forehead, says "Oh! right turn" and
does a right turn.—What has struck him?  An interpretation?
507.  "I  am  not  merely  saying  this,  I  mean  something  by  it."—
When we consider what is going on in us when we mean  (and don't
merely say) words, it seems to us as if there were something coupled
to  these  words,  which  otherwise  would  run  idle.—As if they, so to
speak, connected with something in us.
508.  I say the sentence:  "The weather is fine"; but the words are
after all arbitrary signs—so let's put "a b c d" in their place.  But now
when I read this, I can't connect it straight away with the above sense.—
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Add necessary references: This professional .NET solution that is designed to convert PDF file to HTML web page
adding hyperlinks to pdf files; add links to pdf in preview
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Add, edit, delete links. Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically. Read form data from PDF form file. Add, Update, Delete form fields programmatically.
add page number to pdf hyperlink; add a link to a pdf in preview
M0
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
I am not used, I might say, to saying "a" instead of "the",  "b" instead
of  "weather",  etc. .  But I  don't mean  by that  that I am not  used  to
making  an  immediate  association  between  the  word  "the"  and  "a",
but that I am not used to using "a" in the place of "the"—and therefore
in the sense of "the".  (I have not mastered this language.)
(I am not used  to  measuring temperatures  on the Fahrenheit scale.
Hence such a measure of temperature 'says' nothing to me.)
509.  Suppose we asked someone "In what sense are these words a
description  of what  you  are  seeing?"—and  he  answers:  "I mean   this
by  these  words."  (Say he was  looking  at a  landscape.)  Why  is  this
answer "I mean  this .  .  . ." no answer at all?
How does one use words to mean  what one sees before one?
Suppose  I said  "a b c d"  and  meant:  the weather is  fine.  For as  I
uttered these signs I had the experience normally had only by someone
who  had  year-in  year-out  used  "a"  in  the  sense  of "the",  "b"  in  the
sense of "weather", and so on.—Does "a b c d" now mean: the weather
is  fine?
What  is  supposed  to  be  the  criterion  for  my  having  had that ex-
perience?
510.  Make the following experiment: say "It's cold here" and mean
"It's warm here".  Can you do it?—And what are you doing as you do
it?  And is there only one way of doing it?
511.  What  does  "discovering  that  an  expression  doesn't  make
sense" mean?—and what does it mean to say:  "If I mean something by
it,  surely  it  must  make  sense"?—If  I  mean  something  by  it?—If  I
mean what by it?!—One  wants  to  say:  a  significant  sentence  is  one
which one can not merely say, but also think.
512.  It looks as if we could say: "Word-language allows of sense-
less  combinations  of words,  but  the  language  of imagining  does not
allow us to imagine anything senseless."—Hence, too, the  language of
drawing  doesn't  allow  of  senseless  drawings?  Suppose  they  were
drawings from  which bodies were  supposed to be modelled.  In  this
case some drawings make sense, some not.—What if I imagine senseless
combinations  of  words?
513.  Consider the following form of expression:  "The number of
pages in my book is  equal to  a root of the equation x
3
 zx — 3=0."
Or:  "I  have  n  friends  and  n
2
 2n +  2  = o".  Does  this  sentence
make  sense?  This  cannot  be  seen  immediately.  This  example  shews
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I 
i
4
ie
how it is that something can look like a sentence which we understand,
and yet yield no sense.
(This throws light on the concepts  'understanding' and 'meaning'.)
514.  A philosopher says  that he understands the sentence "I am
here",  that he  means  something by it,  thinks  something—even  when
he doesn't think at all how, on what occasions, this sentence is used.
And if I say "A rose is red in the dark too" you positively see this red
in the dark before you.
515.  Two pictures of a rose in the dark.  One is quite black; for
the rose is invisible.  In the other, it is painted in full detail and sur-
rounded by black.  Is one of them right, the other wrong?  Don't we
talk of a white rose in the dark and of a red rose in the dark?  And
don't we say for all that that they can't be distinguished in the dark?
516.  It seems clear that we understand the meaning of the question:
"Does  the  sequence  7777  occur  in  the  development  of TT  ?"  It  is
an English sentence; it can be shewn what it means for 415 to occur
in the development of TT  ; and similar things.  Well, our understanding
of that question reaches just so far, one may say, as such explanations
reach.
517.  The question arises:  Can't we be mistaken in thinking that
we understand a question?
For many  mathematical  proofs  do  lead  us  to  say  that  we cannot
imagine something which we believed we could imagine.  (E.g., the
construction of the heptagon.)  They lead us to revise what counts as
the domain of the imaginable.
518.  Socrates to Theaetetus:  "And if someone thinks  mustn't he
think something?"—Th:  "Yes,  he  must."—Soc.:  "And  if  he  thinks
something,  mustn't  it be  something  real?"—Th.:  "Apparently."
And mustn't someone who is painting be painting something—and
someone  who  is  painting  something  be  painting  something  real!—
Well, tell me what the object of painting is: the picture of a man (e.g.),
or the man that the picture portrays?
519.  One  wants  to  say  that  an  order  is  a  picture  of the  action
which was carried out on the order; but also that it is a picture of the
action which is to be carried out on the order.
520.  "If a proposition too is  conceived as  a picture of a possible
state of affairs and is said to shew the possibility of the state of affairs,
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness). Add necessary references This is a C# programming example for converting PDF to Word
pdf link; add hyperlink to pdf
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
add hyperlink pdf file; adding hyperlinks to pdf
i
4
2e 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
still  the  most that the  proposition  can do is  what a painting or  relief
or  film  does:  and  so  it  can  at  any  rate  not  set  forth  what  is
not the case.  So does it depend wholly on our grammar what will be
called  (logically)  possible  and  what  not,—i.e.  what  that  grammar
permits?"—But  surely  that  is  arbitrary!—Is  it  arbitrary?—It  is  not
every sentence-like formation that we know how to do something with,
not  every technique has  an  application in  our life;  and  when we  are
tempted in philosophy to count some quite useless thing as a proposi-
tion,  that  is  often  because  we  have  not  considered  its  application
sufficiently.
521.  Compare 'logically possible' with 'chemically possible'.  One
might  perhaps  call  a  combination  chemically  possible  if  a  formula
with  the  right  valencies  existed  (e.g.  H -O -O - O - H).  Of  course
such a combination need not exist;  but even  the formula HO
2
cannot
have less than no combination corresponding to it in reality.
522.  If we  compare  a  proposition  to  a  picture,  we  must  think
whether we are comparing it to a portrait (a historical representation)
or to a genre-picture.  And both comparisons have point.
When I look at a genre-picture, it 'tells' me something, even though
I don't believe (imagine) for a moment that the people I see in it really
exist,  or  that  there  have  really  been  people  in  that  situation.  But
suppose I ask: "What does it tell me, then?"
523.  I  should  like  to  say  "What  the  picture  tells  me  is  itself."
That is,  its telling  me something  consists  in  its  own  structure,  in its
own lines and colours.  (What would it mean to say "What this musical
theme tells me is itself"?)
5 24.  Don't take it as a matter of course, but as a remarkable fact,
that  pictures  and  fictitious  narratives  give  us  pleasure,  occupy  our
minds.
("Don't  take  it  as  a  matter  of  course"  means:  find  it  surprising,
as you do some things which disturb you.  Then  the puzzling aspect
of the latter will disappear, by your accepting this fact as you do the
other.)
((The  transition  from  patent  nonsense  to  something  which  is  dis-
guised  nonsense.))
525.  "After he had said this, he left her as he did the day before."—
Do I  understand  this  sentence?  Do  I understand it  just  as I  should
if I heard it in the course of a narrative?  If it were set down in isolation
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I
143"
I should say, I don't know what it's about.  But all the same I should
know how this sentence might perhaps be used; I could myself invent
a context for it.
(A multitude of familiar paths lead off from these words in  every
direction.)
526,  What  does  it  mean  to  understand  a  picture,  a  drawing?
Here too there is understanding and failure to understand.  And here
too these expressions may mean various kinds of thing.  A picture is
perhaps  a  still-life;  but  I  don't  understand  one  part  of it:  I  cannot
see solid objects  there,  but only patches of colour on the  canvas.—
Or  I  see  everything  as  solid  but  there  are  objects  that  I  am  not
acquainted  with (they look  like implements,  but I don't know  their
use).—Perhaps,  however,  I  am  acquainted  with  the  objects,  but
in another sense do not understand the way they are arranged.
5 27.  Understanding a sentence is much more akin to understanding
a theme in music than one may think.  What I mean is that understand-
ing a sentence lies nearer than one thinks to what is ordinarily called
understanding a musical theme.  Why is just this the pattern of variation
in  loudness  and  tempo?  One  would  like  to  say  "Because  I  know
what it's all about."  But what is it all about?  I should not be able to
say.  In order to 'explain' I could only compare it with something else
which has  the  same  rhythm  (I  mean  the  same  pattern).  (One  says
"Don't you see, this is as if a conclusion were being drawn" or "This
is  as  it were  a  parenthesis",  etc.  How  does  one  justify  such  com-
parisons?—There are very different kinds of justification here.)
528.  It would be possible to imagine people who had something
not quite unlike a language: a play of sounds, without vocabulary or
grammar.  ('Speaking with tongues.')
529.  "But  what  would  the  meaning  of  the  sounds  be  in  such
 case?"—What  is  it  in  music?  Though  I  don't  at  all  wish  to  say
that  this  language  of a  play  of sounds  would  have  to  be  compared
to music.
530.  There might also be a language in whose use the 'soul' of the
words played no part.  In which, for example, we had no objection to
replacing one word by another arbitrary one of our own invention.
531.  We speak of understanding a sentence in the sense in which it
can be replaced by another which says the same; but also in the sense
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
adding hyperlinks to a pdf; pdf hyperlinks
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Add necessary references class programming, you can use specific APIs to create PDF file.
add links to pdf file; add link to pdf file
i
4
4
e
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
in  which  it  cannot  be  replaced  by  any  other.  (Any  more than  one
musical theme can be replaced by another.)
In the one  case the thought in  the sentence is something common
to different sentences; in the other, something that is expressed only
by these words in these positions.  (Understanding a poem.)
532.  Then has "understanding" two different meanings here?—I
would rather say that these kinds of use of "understanding" make up
its meaning, make up my concept of understanding.
For I want to apply the word  "understanding" to all this.
533.  But in the second case how can one explain the expression,
transmit  one's  comprehension?  Ask  yourself:  How  does  one lead
anyone  to comprehension  of a  poem  or  of a  theme?  The  answer to
this tells us how meaning is explained here.
534. Hearing  a word in a particular sense.  How queer that there
should be such a thing!
Phrased like this, emphasized like this, heard in this way, this sentence
is the first of a series in which a transition is made to these  sentences,
pictures, actions.
((A multitude of familiar paths lead  off from these words in every
direction.))
535.  What happens when we learn to feel the ending of a church
mode as an ending?
536.  I say: "I can think of this face (which gives an impression of
timidity)  as  courageous  too."  We  do  not  mean  by  this  that  I  can
imagine someone with this  face perhaps  saving  someone's  life  (that,
of course, is imaginable in connexion with any face).  I am speaking
rather of an aspect of the face itself.  Nor do I mean that I can imagine
that this man's face might change so that, in the ordinary sense, it looked
courageous; though I may very well mean that there is a quite definite
way in which it can change into a courageous face.  The reinterpreta-
tion  of a  facial  expression  can  be  compared  to  the reinterpretation
of a chord in music, when we hear it as  a modulation first into this,
then into that key.
537.  It is possible to say "I read timidity in this  face" but at all
events the timidity does not seem to be merely associated, outwardly
connected, with the face; but fear is there, alive, in the features.  If the
features change slightly, we can speak of a corresponding change in the
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I
145*
fear.  If we were asked "Can you think of this face as an expression of
courage too?"—we should, as it were, not know how to lodge courage
in  these  features.  Then  perhaps  I  say "I  don't  know  what  it would
mean for this to be a courageous face."  But what would an answer to
such a question  be  like?  Perhaps  one  says:  "Yes, now I understand:
the  face  as  it  were  shews  indifference  to  the  outer world."  So  we
have somehow read courage into the face.  Now once more, one might
say, courage fits this face.  But what fits what here?
538.  There is a related case (though perhaps it will not  seem  so)
when,  for  example,  we  (Germans)  are  surprised  that  in  French  the
predicative adjective agrees with the substantive in gender, and when
we explain it to ourselves  by saying:  they mean:  "the  man is a good
oner
539.  I  see a picture which represents  a smiling face.  What  do I
do if I  take the smile  now as a kind one, now as  malicious?  Don't I
often  imagine  it  with  a  spatial  and  temporal  context  which  is  one
either of kindness or malice?  Thus I might supply the picture with the
fancy that the smiler was smiling down on a child at play, or again on
the suffering of an enemy.
This is in no way altered by the fact that I can also take the at first
sight gracious situation and interpret it differently by putting it into a
wider context.—If no special circumstances  reverse  my interpretation
I shall  conceive a particular smile as  kind,  call it a "kind"  one,  react
correspondingly.
((Probability,  frequency.))
540.  "Isn't it very odd that I should be  unable—even without the
institution  of language  and all  its  surroundings—to  think  that  it  will
soon  stop  raining?"—Do  you  want  to  say  that  it  is  queer  that  you
should  be  unable  to  say  these  words  and mean   them without  those
surroundings?
Suppose  someone  were  to  point  at  the  sky  and  come  out  with  a
number  of unintelligible  words.  When  we  ask  him  what  he  means
he  explains  that  the  words  mean  "Thank  heaven,  it'll  soon  stop
raining."  He even explains to us the meaning of the individual words.
—I  will  suppose  him  suddenly  to  come to  himself and  say that the
sentence  was completely  senseless,  but that  when he  spoke  it it had
seemed  to  him  like  a  sentence  in  a  language  he  knew.  (Positively
146*
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I
like a familiar quotation.)—What am I to say now?  Didn't he under-
stand the  sentence  as he  was  saying  it?  Wasn't  the  whole  meaning
there in the sentence?
541.  But what did his understanding, and the meaning, consist in?
He  uttered  the  sounds  in a cheerful  voice perhaps,  pointing  to the
sky,  while  it  was  still  raining  but  was  already  beginning  to  clear
up; later he  made  a  connexion between  his  words  and  the  English
words.
542.  "But the point is, the words felt to him like the words of a
language he knew well."—Yes: a criterion for that is that he later said
just that.  And now do not say: "The feel of the words in a language we
know is  of a quite particular kind."  (What  is the expression  of this
feeling?)
543.  Can I not say: a cry, a laugh, are full of meaning?
And that means, roughly:  much can be gathered from them.
544.  When longing  makes me cry "Oh, if only he would come!"
the feeling gives the words 'meaning'.  But does it give the individual
words their meanings?
But here one could also say that the feeling gave the words truth.  And
from this you can see how the concepts merge here.  (This recalls the
question: what is the meaning  of a mathematical proposition?)
545.  But when one says  "I hope he'll come"—doesn't the feeling
give  the  word  "hope"  its  meaning?  (And  what  about  the  sentence
"I do not hope for his coming any longer"?)  The feeling does perhaps
give the word  "hope" its  special  ring;  that  is, it  is  expressed  in that
ring.—If the feeling gives the word its meaning, then here  "meaning"
means point.  But why is the feeling the point?
Is hope a feeling?  (Characteristic marks.)
546.  In  this  way  I  should  like  to  say  the  words  "Oh, let  him
cornel" are charged with my desire.  And words can be wrung from
us,—like a cry.  Words can be hard  to say: such, for example, as  are
used to effect a  renunciation,  or to confess a weakness.  (Words  are
also deeds.)
547.  Negation:  a 'mental activity'.  Negate something and observe
what you are doing.—Do you perhaps inwardly shake your head? And
if you  do—is  this  process  more  deserving  of our  interest  than,  say,
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I 
i
47
e
that of writing a sign of negation in a sentence?  Do you now know
the essence  of negation?
548.  What is the difference between the two processes: wishing that
something should happen—and wishing that the same thing should not
happen?
If we want to represent it pictorially, we shall treat the picture of the
event in various ways: cross it out, put a line round it, and so on.  But
this  strikes  us  as  a crude  method  of  expression.  In  word-language
indeed  we use  the  sign  "not".  But  this  is  like  a  clumsy expedient.
We think that in thought it is arranged differently.
549.  "How can the word 'not' negate?"—"The sign  'not' indicates
that you are to take what follows negatively."  We should like to say:
The  sign  of negation  is  our occasion  for doing  something—possibly
something very  complicated.  It is as if the negation-sign occasioned
our doing something.  But what?  That is not said.  It is as if it only
needed to  be hinted at;  as if we already knew.  As if no explanation
were  needed,  for  we  are  in  any  case  already  acquainted  with  the
matter.
550.  Negation, one might say, is a gesture of exclusion, of rejec-
tion.  But such a gesture is used in a great variety of cases 1
551.  "Does  the same negation occur in:  'Iron  does  not  melt at a
hundred degrees Centigrade' and 'Twice two is not  five'?"  Is this  to
be  decided  by  introspection;  by trying  to  see  what we  are thinking
as we utter the two sentences?
552.  Suppose I were to ask: is it clear to us, while we are uttering
the sentences "This rod is one yard long" and "Here is one soldier",
(a)  "The  fact  that  three  negatives  yield  a  negative  again  must
already  be  contained  in  the  single  negative  that  I  am  using  now."
(The temptation to  invent a  myth of 'meaning'.)
It looks as if it followed from the nature of negation that a double
negative is an affirmative.  (And there is something right about this.
What? Our nature is connected with both.)
(b)  There  cannot  be  a  question  whether  these  or  other  rules  are
the correct ones  for the  use  of "not".  (I mean, whether they accord
with  its  meaning.)  For  without  these  rules  the word  has  as  yet  no
meaning; and if we change the rules,  it now has another meaning (or
none), and in that case we may just as well change the word too.
148*
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
that  we  mean  different  things  by  "one",  that  "one"  has  different
meanings?—Not  at  all.—Say  e.g.  such  a  sentence  as  "One  yard  is
occupied  by  one  soldier,  and  so  two  yards  are  occupied  by  two
soldiers."  Asked  "Do  you  mean  the  same  thing  by  both  'ones'?"
one would perhaps answer: "Of course I  mean the same  thing: one  1"
(Perhaps raising one ringer.)
553.  Now has "i" a different meaning when it stands for a measure
and when  it  stands  for  a number?  If the  question  is  framed  in this
way, one will answer in the affirmative.
\
5 5 4.  We can easily imagine human beings with a 'more primitive'
logic,  in  which  something  corresponding  to  our  negation  is  applied
only to certain sorts of sentence; perhaps to such as do not themselves
contain any negation.  It would be  possible to negate  the proposition
"He is going into the house", but a negation of the negative proposi-
tion would be meaningless, or would count only as a repetition of the
negation.  Think of means  of expressing negation different from ours:
by the pitch of one's voice, for instance.  What would a double negation
be like there?
555 .  The question whether negation had the same meaning to these
people as to us would be analogous to the question whether the figure
"5" meant the same to people whose numbers ended at  5  as to us.
556.  Imagine a language with  two different words for negation,
"X"  and  "Y".  Doubling  "X"  yields  an  affirmative,  doubling  "Y"
a strengthened negative.  For the rest the two words are used alike.—
Now  have  "X"  and  "Y"  the  same meaning  in  sentences  where  they
occur  without  being  repeated?—We  could  give  various  answers  to
this.
(a)  The  two  words  have  different  uses.  So  they  have  different
meanings.  But sentences in which they occur without being repeated
and which for the rest are the same make the same sense.
(b)  The  two  words  have  the  same  function  in  language-games,
except for this one difference, which is just a trivial convention.  The
use of the two words is taught in the same way, by means of the same
actions, gestures, pictures and so on; and in explanations of the words
the  difference  in the ways they  are  used  is  appended  as  something
incidental, as one of the capricious features of the language.  For this
reason we  shall say that  "X" and "Y" have the same meaning.
(c)  We connect different images with the two negatives.  "X" as it
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I 
i
49
e
were turns the sense through 180°.  And that is why two such negatives
restore  the  sense  to its  former position.  "Y"  is  like  a  shake  of the
head.  And just as one does not annul a shake of the head by shaking
it again, so also one doesn't cancel one "Y" by a second one.  And so
even if, practically speaking, sentences with the two signs of negation
come to the same thing, still "X" and "Y" express different ideas.
5 5 7.  Now, when I uttered the double negation, what constituted my
meaning  it  as  a  strengthened  negative  and  not  as  an  affirmative?
There  is  no  answer  running:  "It  consisted  in  the  fact  that . . . . . "
In certain circumstances instead of saying "This duplication is meant
as  a strengthening," I can pronounce  it as  a strengthening.  Instead of
saying  "The duplication  of the negative is meant to  cancel it" I  can
e.g. put brackets.—"Yes, but after all these brackets may themselves
have various roles; for who says that they are to be taken as brackets'?"
No  one  does.  And  haven't  you  explained  your  own  conception in
turn  by  means  of words?  The  meaning  of the  brackets  lies  in the
technique of applying them. The question is: under what circumstances
does  it make sense  to say  "I  meant . . . .",  and what circumstances
justify me in saying "He meant .  .  .  ."?
558.  What does it mean to say that the "is" in "The rose is red"
has a different meaning from the "is" in "twice two is four"?  If it is
answered  that  it means  that different  rules  are  valid  for these  two
words, we can say that we have only one  word here.—And if all I am
attending to is grammatical rules, these do allow the use of the word
"is"  in  both  connexions.—But  the  rule  which  shews  that  the  word
"is" has different meanings in these sentences is the one allowing us
to replace the word "is" in the second sentence by the sign of equality,
and forbidding this substitution in the first sentence.
559.  One would like to  speak  of the function of a word in this
sentence.  As if the sentence w
r
ere a mechanism in  which the word
had  a  particular  function.  But  what does  this  function  consist in?
How does it come to  light?  For  there  isn't  anything  hidden—don't
we see the whole sentence?  The function  must come  out  in  operat-
ing with the word.  ((Meaning-body.))
560.  "The meaning of a word is what is explained by the explana-
tion  of the meaning."  I.e.:  if you want to  understand the use of the
word "meaning",  look for what are called "explanations of meaning".
Ijoe
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
561.  Now isn't it queer that I say that the word "is" is used with
two  different  meanings  (as  the  copula  and  as  the  sign of equality),
and should not care to say that its meaning is  its use; its use, that is,
as the copula and the sign of equality?
One would  like to  say that  these two kinds  of use do  not yield  a
single meaning; the union under one head is an accident, a mere in-
essential.
562.  But how can I decide what is  an  essential, and what an in-
essential,  accidental,  feature  of  the  notation?  Is  there  some  reality
lying behind the notation, which shapes its  grammar?
Let us think of a similar case in a game: in draughts a king is marked
by  putting one  piece  on top  of another.  Now won't one  say it is  in-
essential to the game for a king to consist of two pieces?
5 63.  Let us say that the meaning of a piece is its role in the game.—
Now  let it  be  decided  by  lot  which  of the  players  gets  white before
any game of chess begins.  To this end one player holds a king in each
closed fist while the other chooses one  of the two hands  at  random.
Will it be counted as part of the role of the  king in chess that it is used
to draw lots in this way?
564.  So I am inclined to distinguish between the essential and the
inessential in a game too.  The game, one would like to say, has not
only rules but also a point.
565.  Why the same word?  In the calculus we make no use of this
identity!—Why the same piece for both purposes?—But what does it
mean  here  to  speak  of "making  use  of the  identity"?  For  isn't  it  a
use, if we do in fact use the same word?
566.  And now it looks as if the use of the same word or the same
piece, had a purpose— if the identity is not accidental, inessential.  And
as if the purpose were that one  should be able to recognize the piece
and know how to play.—Are we talking about a physical or a logical
possibility here?  If the latter then the identity of the piece is something
to do with the game.
5 67.  But, after all, the game is supposed to be denned by the rules!
So, if a rule  of the game prescribes that the kings are to be used for
drawing lots before a game of chess, then that is an essential part of
the game.  What objection might one make to this?  That one does not
see the point of this prescription.  Perhaps as one wouldn't see the point
either of a rule by which each piece had to be turned round three times
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I 
i
5I
e
before one moved it.  If we found this rule in a board-game we should
be  surprised  and  should  speculate  about  the  purpose  of  the  rule.
("Was  this  prescription  meant  to  prevent  one  from  moving  without
due  consideration?")
568.  If  I  understand  the  character  of the  game  aright—I  might
say—then this isn't an essential part of it.
((Meaning is a physiognomy.))
569.  Language  is  an  instrument.  Its  concepts  are  instruments.
Now perhaps  one thinks  that  it can  make no great difference which
concepts we employ.  As, after all, it is possible to do physics in feet
and  inches  as  well  as  in  metres  and  centimetres;  the  difference  is
merely one of convenience.  But even this is not true if, for instance,
calculations in  some system of measurement demand more time and
trouble than it is possible for us to give them.
570.  Concepts lead us  to make investigations;  are  the expression
of our  interest,  and  direct  our  interest.
571.  Misleading  parallel:  psychology  treats  of  processes  in  the
psychical sphere, as does physics in the physical.
Seeing,  hearing,  thinking,  feeling,  willing,  are  not  the  subject  of
psychology in the same sense as that in which the movements of bodies,
the phenomena of electricity etc., are the subject of physics.  You can
see this from the fact that the physicist sees, hears, thinks about, and
informs  us  of these  phenomena,  and  the  psychologist  observes  the
external reactions (the behaviour) of the subject.
572.  Expectation  is,  grammatically,  a  state;  like:  being  of  an
opinion, hoping for something,  knowing something, being able to do
something.  But  in  order  to understand the  grammar of these states
it is necessary to ask: "What counts as a criterion for anyone's being in
such a state?" (States of hardness, of weight, of fitting.)
573.  To have an opinion is a state.—A state of what?  Of the soul?
Of the mind?  Well, of what object does one say that it has an opinion?
Of Mr. N.N. for example.  And that is the correct answer.
One  should  not  expect  to  be  enlightened  by  the  answer  to that
question.  Others  go deeper:  What,  in particular cases, do we regard
as  criteria for someone's  being of such-and-such an opinion?  When
do we say: he reached this opinion at that time?  When: he has altered
his  opinion?  And  so  on.  The  picture  which  the  answers  to  these
questions give us shews what gets treated grammatically as a state here.
IJ2
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
5 74.  A proposition, and hence in another sense a thought, can be
the  'expression'  of  belief,  hope,  expectation,  etc.  But  believing  is
not  thinking.  (A  grammatical  remark.)  The  concepts  of believing,
expecting, hoping are less distantly related to one another than they are
to  the  concept  of thinking.
575.  When I sat down on this chair, of course I believed it would
bear me.  I had no thought of its possibly collapsing.
But: "In spite of everything that he did, I held fast to the belief. . . ."
Here there  is  thought,  and perhaps  a  constant struggle  to  renew  an
attitude.
576.  I watch  a  slow  match  burning,  in  high  excitement  follow
the progress of the burning and its approach to the explosive.  Perhaps
I  don't  think  anything  at  all  or  have  a  multitude  of  disconnected
thoughts.  This is certainly a case of expecting.
577.  We say "I am expecting him", when we believe that he will
come,  though  his  coming  does  not occupy our thoughts.  (Here  "I  am
expecting him" would mean "I should be surprised if he didn't come"
and that will not be  called  the  description  of a  state  of mind.)  But
we  also  say  "I  am  expecting  him"  when  it  is  supposed  to  mean:
I  am  eagerly  awaiting  him.  We  could  imagine  a  language in which
different verbs were consistently used in these cases.  And similarly
more than one verb where we speak of 'believing', 'hoping' and so on.
Perhaps the concepts of such a language would be more suitable for
understanding  psychology than  the concepts  of our language.
578.  Ask  yourself:  What  does  it  mean  to believe   Goldbach's
theorem?  What does this belief consist in?  In a feeling of certainty as
we state, hear,  or think the  theorem?  (That would not interest  us.)
And what are the characteristics of this feeling?  Why, I don't even
know how far the feeling may be caused by the proposition itself.
Am I  to say that  belief is  a particular  colouring of our  thoughts?
Where does this idea come from?  Well, there is a tone of belief, as of
doubt.
I should like to ask: how does the belief connect with this proposi-
tion?  Let  us look and see  what  are the  consequences of this  belief,
where it takes us.  "It makes me search for a proof of the proposition."
—Very well; and now let us look and see what your searching really
consists in.  Then we shall know what belief in the proposition amounts
to.
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I 
i
J5
e
579.  The  feeling  of  confidence.  How  is  this  manifested  in
behaviour?
580.  An  'inner process*  stands in  need  of outward  criteria.
581.  An  expectation  is  imbedded  in  a  situation,  from  which  it
arises.  The expectation of an explosion may, for example, arise from
a situation in which an explosion is to be expected.
582.  If someone whispers "It'll go off now", instead of saying "I
expect  the  explosion any moment",  still his words  do not describe a
feeling; although  they and  their tone  may  be  a  manifestation of his
feeling.
583.  "But you talk as if I weren't really expecting, hoping, now—
as  I  thought  I  was.  As  if what  were  happening now   had  no  deep
significance."—What does it mean to say "What is happening now has
significance"  or  "has  deep  significance"?  What  is  a deep  feeling?
Could someone have a feeling of ardent love or hope for the space of
one second—no matter what preceded or followed  this  second?——
What  is  happening  now  has  significance—in  these  surroundings.
The  surroundings  give  it  its  importance.  And  the  word  "hope"
refers to a phenomenon of human life.  (A smiling mouth smiles only
in a human face.)
5 84.  Now suppose I sit in my room and hope that N.N. will come
and bring me some money, and suppose one minute of this state could
be isolated, cut out of its context; would what happened in it then not
be hope?—Think, for example, of the words which you perhaps utter
in this space of time.  They are no longer part of this language.  And
in different surroundings the institution of money doesn't exist either.
A coronation is the picture of pomp and dignity.  Cut one minute
of this proceeding out of its surroundings: the crown is being placed
on the  head  of the  king in his  coronation  robes.—But  in  different
surroundings  gold  is  the  cheapest  of  metals,  its  gleam  is  thought
vulgar.  There the fabric of the robe is cheap to produce.  A crown is
a parody of a respectable hat.  And so on.
585.  When  someone  says  "I  hope  he'll  come"—is  this  a report
about his state of mind,  or a manifestation  of his hope?—I can, for
example, say it to myself.  And surely I am not giving myself a report.
It  may  be  a  sigh;  but  it  need not.  If I  tell  someone  "I  can't  keep
my mind on my work today;  I  keep  on  thinking of his  coming"—
this will be called a description of my state of mind.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested