IJ4
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
586.  "I  have heard he is coming; I have been  waiting for him all
day."  That is a  report on how I have  spent the day.——In conversa-
tion I came to the conclusion that a particular event is to be expected,
and I draw this conclusion in the words:  "So now I must expect him
to  come".  This  may  be  called  the  first  thought, the  first  act,  of this
expectation.——The  exclamation  "I'm  longing  to  see  him!"  may  be
called an act of expecting.  But I can utter the same words as the result
of self-observation,  and then  they might  mean:  "So,  after  all  that has
happened,  I  am still  longing  to  see him."  The  point is:  what  led  up
to  these  words?
587.  Does  it  make  sense  to  ask  "How  do  you  know  that  you
believe?"—and  is  the  answer:  "I  know  it by  introspection"?
In some  cases  it  will be  possible  to  say  some  such  thing,  in  most
not.
It makes sense to ask: "Do I really love her, or am I only pretending
to  myself?"  and  the  process  of  introspection  is  the  calling  up  of
memories;  of imagined possible situations, and of the feelings that one
would  have  if  ....
588.  "I  am revolving the decision to  go  away to-morrow."  (This
may  be  called  a  description  of a  state  of mind.)——"Your arguments
don't  convince  me;  now  as  before  it  is  my  intention  to  go  away  to-
morrow."  Here  one  is  tempted  to  call  the  intention  a  feeling.  The
feeling is  one  of a certain  rigidity;  of unalterable determination.  (But
there are many different characteristic feelings and attitudes here.)——
I am  asked: "How  long are  you staying here?"  I  reply:  "To-morrow
I am going away; it's the end of my holidays."—But over against this:
I  say  at  the  end  of a quarrel  "All  right!  Then  I  leave  to-morrow 1";
I make a decision.
589.  "In  my  heart  I  have  determined  on  it."  And  one  is  even
inclined  to  point  to  one's  breast as  one  says  it.  Psychologically  this
way  of speaking should be  taken  seriously.  Why should  it  be  taken
I  less seriously than the assertion that belief is a state of mind?  (Luther:
"Faith  is  under  the  left  nipple.")
590.  Someone  might  learn  to  understand  the  meaning  of  the
expression  "seriously meaning  what  one  says"  by  means  of a  gesture
of pointing at the heart.  But now we must ask:  "How does it come
out that he has learnt it?"
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
IJ
5
e
591.  Am I  to  say  that  any  one who  has  an  intention  has  an  ex-
perience  of  tending  towards  something?  That  there  are  particular
experiences of 'tending'?—Remember this case: if one urgently wants
to make some remark, some objection, in a discussion, it often happens
that one opens one's mouth, draws  a breath and holds it; if one then
decides to let the objection go, one lets the breath out.  The experience
of this process is  evidently the experience of veering  towards saying
something.  Anyone  who  observes  me  will  know  that  I  wanted  to
say something and then thought better of it.  In this situation, that is.—
In a different one he would not so interpret my behaviour, however
characteristic of the intention to speak it may be in the present situation.
And is there any reason for assuming that this same experience could
not occur in some quite different  situation—in  which it has  nothing
to  do  with  any  'tending'?
592.  "But when you say 'I intend to go away', you surely mean it!
Here again it just is the mental act of meaning that gives the sentence
life.  If you merely repeat the sentence after someone else, say in order
to  mock  his  way  of  speaking,  then  you  say  it  without  this  act  of
meaning."—When  we  are  doing  philosophy  it  can  sometimes  look
like  that.  But  let  us  really  think  out  various different  situations  and
conversations, and the ways in which that sentence will be uttered in
them.—"I  always  discover  a  mental  undertone;  perhaps  not  always
the same one."  And was there no undertone there when you repeated
the  sentence  after someone  else?  And  how  is  the  'undertone'  to  be
separated  from the  rest  of the experience  of speaking?
593.  A main cause of philosophical disease—a one-sided diet:  one
nourishes one's thinking with only one kind of example.
594.  "But the words, significantly uttered, have after all not only
a  surface, but  also the dimension  of depth!"  After all,  it  just is  the
case that something different  takes place  when they are  uttered  sig-
nificantly from when they are merely uttered.—How I express this is
not the point.  Whether I say that in the first case they have depth; or
that something  goes  on in  me,  inside  my  mind, as  I  utter them;  or
that they have an atmosphere—it always comes to the  same thing.
"Well,  if we all agree  about it, won't it be true?"
(I cannot accept someone else's testimony, because it is not testimony.
It only tells me what he is inclined  to say.)
595.  It is natural for us  to say a sentence in such-and-such  sur-
roundings,  and  unnatural  to  say  it  in  isolation.  Are  we  to  say  that
Pdf edit hyperlink - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink in pdf; add link to pdf acrobat
Pdf edit hyperlink - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
change link in pdf file; adding links to pdf document
,
5
6» 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
there  is  a  particular  feeling  accompanying  the  utterance  of  every
sentence when we say it naturally?
596.  The feeling  of 'familiarity' and  of 'naturalness'.  It is easier
to get at a feeling of unfamiliarity and of unnaturalness.  Or, at feelings.
For not everything which is unfamiliar to us makes an impression of
unfamiliarity upon us.  Here  one  has  to  consider  what  we  call  "un-
familiar".  If a  boulder  lies  on  the  road,  we  know  it  for  a  boulder,
but perhaps not for the one which has always lain there.  We recognize
a man, say, as a man, but not as an acquaintance.  There are feelings of
old  acquaintance:  they are  sometimes expressed by a particular way
of looking or by the words: "The same old room!" (which I occupied
many  years  before  and  now  returning  find  unchanged).  Equally
there  are feelings  of strangeness.  I stop  short,  look at the object or
man  questioningly  or  mistrustfully,  say  "I  find  it  all  strange."—
But  the  existence  of this  feeling  of strangeness  does  not  give  us  a
reason for saying  that every  object  which we  know well and which
does  not  seem  strange  to  us  gives  us  a  feeling  of familiarity.—We
think that, as it were, the place once filled by the feeling of strangeness
must surely be occupied somehow. The place for this kind of atmosphere
is there, and if one of them is not in possession of it, then another is.
597.  Just as Germanisms creep into the speech of a German who
speaks English well although he does not first construct the German
expression and then translate it into  English;  just as this  makes him
speak English as if he were translating  'unconsciously' from the German
—so we  often  think  as if our  thinking  were founded  on a  thought-
schema:  as  if we  were  translating  from  a  more  primitive  mode  of
thought into  ours.
598.  When  we  do  philosophy,  we  should  like  to  hypostatize
feelings  where  there  are  none.  They  serve  to  explain  our  thoughts
to us.
'Here explanation of our thinking demands a feeling!' It is as if our
conviction were simply consequent upon this requirement.
599.  In philosophy we do not draw conclusions.  "But it must be
like  this!" is not a philosophical proposition.  Philosophy only  states
what everyone admits.
600.  Does everything  that we do not  find  conspicuous  make  an
impression  of  inconspicuousness?  Does  what  is  ordinary  always
make the impression  of ordinariness?
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I 
i
J7
e
601.  When  I talk  about  this  table,—am I remembering  that this
object is called a "table"?
602.  Asked "Did you recognize your desk when you entered your
room this morning?"—I should no doubt say "Certainly!"  And yet
it would  be misleading to say that an act  of recognition had taken
place.  Of course the desk was not strange to me; I was not surprised
to see it, as I should have been if another one had been standing there,
or some unfamiliar kind of object.
603.  No  one will say that every time  I  enter my room,  my long-
familiar surroundings,  there  is  enacted  a  recognition of all that I  see
and have seen hundreds of times  before.
604.  It  is  easy  to  have  a  false  picture  of  the  processes  called
"recognizing";  as  if  recognizing  always  consisted  in  comparing  two
impressions with one another.  It is as if I carried a picture of an object
with me and used it to perform an identification of an object as the one
represented by the picture.  Our memory seems to us to be the agent of
such  a  comparison,  by  preserving  a  picture  of what  has  been  seen
before, or by allowing us to look into the past (as if down a spy-glass).
605.  And  it  is  not  so  much  as  if I  were  comparing  the  object
with a picture set beside it, but as if the object coincided  with the picture.
So I see only one thing, not two.
606.  We say "The expression in his voice was genuine".  If it was
spurious  we think  as  it were  of another  one behind it.—This is  the
face he shews the world, inwardly he has another one.—But this does
not mean that when his expression is genuine he has two the same.
(("A quite particular  expression."))
607.  How  does  one  judge  what  time  it  is?  I  do  not  mean  by
external  evidences,  however,  such  as  the  position  of  the  sun,  the
lightness of the room, and so on.—One asks oneself, say, "What time
can  it  be?",  pauses  a  moment,  perhaps  imagines  a  clock-face,  and
then says a time.—Or one considers various possibilities, thinks first
of one time, then of another, and in the end stops at one.  That is the
kind of way it is done.——But isn't the idea accompanied by a feeling
of conviction;  and  doesn't  that  mean  that  it  accords  with  an  inner
clock?—No, I don't read the time off from any clock; there is a feeling
of conviction inasmuch as  I say  a time to  myself without feeling  any
doubt,  with  calm  assurance.—But  doesn't  something  click  as  I  say
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
change link in pdf; add hyperlinks to pdf online
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add url to pdf; pdf links
i
5
ge 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
this time?—Not that I know of; unless that is what you call the coming-
to-rest of deliberation, the stopping at one number.  Nor should I ever
have  spoken  of a  'feeling  of conviction'  here,  but  should  have  said:
I considered a while and then plumped for its being quarter past five.—
But what did I go by?  I  might perhaps  have  said:  "simply by feel",
which  only  means  that  I  left  it  to  what  should  suggest  itself.——
But you surely must at least have disposed yourself in a definite way
in order to guess the time; and you don't take just any idea of a time
of day  as  yielding  the  correct  time!—To  repeat:  I asked  myself  "I
wonder what  time  it  is?"  That  is,  I  did  not,  for  example,  read  this
question  in  some  narrative,  or  quote  it  as  someone  else's  utterance;
nor  was  I  practising  the  pronunciation  of these  words;  and  so  on.
These were not the circumstances of my saying the words.—But then,
what were the circumstances?—I was thinking about my breakfast
and wondering whether it would be late today.  These were the kind
of circumstances.—But do you really not see that you were all the same
disposed in a way which, though impalpable, is characteristic of guess-
ing the time, like being surrounded by a characteristic atmosphere?—
Yes;  what  was  characteristic  was  that  I  said  to  myself  "I  wonder
what time it  is?"—And if this  sentence has  a  particular  atmosphere,
how am I to separate it from the sentence itself?  It would never have
occurred to  me to  think  the  sentence had  such  an  aura if I  had  not
thought of how one might say it differently—as a quotation, as a joke,
as practice in elocution, and so on.  And then  all at once I wanted to
say, then all at once it seemed to me, that I must after all have meant
the words somehow specially; differently, that is, from in those other
cases.  The  picture  of the  special atmosphere  forced  itself upon  me;
I  can see it quite clear before me—so long, that is, as I do not look
at what my memory tells me really happened.
And as for the feeling of certainty: I sometimes say to myself "I am
sure it's . . . o'clock", and in a more or less  confident tone of voice,
and so on.  If you ask me the reason  for this certainty I have none.
If I say, I read it off from an inner clock,—that is a picture, and the
only thing that corresponds to it is that I said it was such-and-such a
time.  And the purpose of the picture is to assimilate this case to the
other one.  I am refusing to acknowledge two different cases here.
608.  The idea of the intangibility of that mental state in estimating
the time  is  of the greatest  importance.  Why  is  it intangible'*  Isn't  it
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
JJ9
e
because we refuse to count what is tangible about our state as part of
the specific state which we are  postulating?
609.  The  description  of an  atmosphere  is  a  special  application  of
language, for special purposes.
((Interpreting 'understanding' as atmosphere; as a mental act.  One
can  construct an atmosphere to attach to anything.  'An indescribable
character.'))
610.  Describe the aroma of coffee.—Why can't it be done?  Do we
lack the words?  And for what are words lacking?—But how do we get
the idea that such a description must after ail be possible?  Have you
ever  felt  the lack of such  a  description?  Have  you  tried to  describe
the aroma and not succeeded?
((I  should  like to  say:  "These  notes  say  something  glorious,  but  I
do not know what."  These notes are a powerful gesture, but I cannot
put  anything  side  by  side  with  it  that  will  serve  as  an  explanation.
A  grave  nod.  James:  "Our  vocabulary  is  inadequate."  Then  why
don't we introduce a new one?  What would have to be the case for us
to be able to?))
611.  "Willing too is merely an experience," one would like to say
(the 'will' too only 'idea').  It comes when it comes, and I cannot bring
it about.
Not  bring  it  about?—Like whafi  What  can  I  bring about, then?
What am I comparing willing with when I say this?
612.  I  should  not say of the movement  of my arm,  for  example;,
it comes when it comes, etc. .  And this is the region in which we say
significantly that a thing doesn't simply happen to us, but that we do
it.  "I don't need to wait for my arm to go up—I  can raise it."  And
here  I  am  making  a  contrast  between  the  movement of my arm and,
say, the fact that the violent thudding of my heart will subside.
613.  In the sense in which I can ever bring anything about (such
as stomach-ache through over-eating),  I  can  also bring about an  act
of willing,  In this sense I bring about the act of willing to  swirn by
jumping into the water.  Doubtless  I was trying to say: I  can't will
willing; that is, it makes no sense to speak of willing willing.  "Willing"
is not the name of an  action;  and so not the name of any voluntary
action  either.  And  my  use  of a  wrong  expression  came  from  our
wanting  to  think  of  willing  as  an  immediate  non-causal  bringing-
about.  A  misleading analogy  lies  at the root  of this  idea;  the causal
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
processing images contained in PDF file. Please click to see details. PDF Hyperlink Edit. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers
pdf link open in new window; add links to pdf online
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
processing images contained in PDF file. Please click to see details. C#.NET: Edit PDF Hyperlink. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package
add a link to a pdf file; add links to pdf document
i6oe 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
nexus seems to be established by a mechanism connecting two parts of
 machine.  The connexion  may be  broken  if the mechanism is  dis-
turbed.  (We think only of theu-disturbances to which a mechanism is
normally  subject,  not,  say,  of cog-wheels  suddenly  going  soft,  or
passing through one another, and so on.)
614.  When I raise my  arm  'voluntarily'  I  do not use  any  instru-
ment to bring the movement about.  My wish is not such an instrument
either.
615.  "Willing,  if it  is  not  to  be  a  sort  of wishing,  must  be  the
action itself. It cannot be allowed to stop anywhere short of the action."
If it  is  the  action,  then  it  is  so  in  the  ordinary  sense  of the  word;
so it is speaking,  writing,  walking,  lifting a  thing, imagining some-
thing.  But it is also trying, attempting, making an effort,—to speak,
to write, to lift a thing, to imagine something etc. .
616.  When  I  raise  my  arm,  I  have not  wished  it  might  go  up.
The voluntary action excludes this wish.  It is indeed possible to say:
"I hope I shall draw the circle faultlessly".  And that is to express a wish
that one's hand should move in such-and-such a way.
617.  If we cross our fingers in a certain special way we are some-
times unable to move a particular finger when someone tells us to do
so, if he only points to the finger—merely shews it to  the eye.  If on
the  other  hand  he  touches  it,  we  can  move  it.  One  would  like  to
describe this experience as follows: we are unable to will to move the
finger. The case is quite different from that in which we are not able
to move the finger because someone is, say, holding it.  One now feels
inclined to describe the former case by saying: one can't find any point
of application for the will till the finger is touched.  Only when one
feels the ringer can the will know where it is to catch hold.—But this
kind  of expression  is  misleading.  One  would  like  to  say:  "How  am
I to know where I am to catch hold with the will, if feeling does not
shew  the place?"  But  then  how is  it known  to  what point  I  am  to
direct the will when the feeling is there?
That in this case the finger is as it were paralysed until we feel  a
touch  on  it is  shewn  by experience;  it  could  not  have  been  seen a
priori.
618.  One imagines the willing subject here as  something without
any mass  (without any  inertia);  as  a  motor which has  no  inertia  in
itself to  overcome.  And  so  it  is  only  mover,  not  moved.  That  is:
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
i6ie
One can say "I will, but my body does not obey me"—but not: "My
will does not  obey  me."  (Augustine.)
But in the  sense in  which I cannot fail to will, I cannot try to will
either.
619.  And one might say: "I can always will only inasmuch as I can
never try to will."
620. Doing  itself seems  not to have any volume of experience.  It
seems  like  an  extensionless  point,  the  point of a  needle.  This point
seems to be the real agent.  And the phenomenal happenings only to be
consequences of this acting.  "I do . . ." seems to have a definite sense,
separate from all experience.
621.  Let us not forget this: when 'I raise my arm', my arm goes up.
And the problem arises: what is left over if I subtract the fact that my
arm goes up from the fact that I raise my arm?
((Are the kinaesthetic sensations  my willing?))
622.  When I raise my arm I do not usually try to raise it.
623.  "At  all  costs  I  will  get  to  that  house."—But  if there  is  no
difficulty about it—can I try at all costs to get to the house?
624.  In  the  laboratory,  when  subjected to  an electric  current,  for
example,  someone says with his  eyes shut "I am moving my arm up
and  down"—though  his  arm  is  not  moving.  "So,"  we  say,  "he  has
the  special  feeling  of making  that  movement."—Move  your  arm to
and  fro with your eyes  shut.  And now try,  while you do so, to tell
yourself that your arm  is  staying  still  and  that  you  are  only  having
certain queer feelings in your muscles and joints!
625.  "How  do  you  know  that  you  have  raised  your  arm?"—"I
feel it."  So what you recognize is  the feeling?  And  are  you  certain
that you recognize it right?—You are certain that you have raised your
arm; isn't this the criterion, the
-
measure, of the recognition?
626.  "When I touch this object with a stick I have the sensation of
touching in the tip of the stick, not in the hand that holds it."  When
someone  says  "The  pain  isn't  here  in  my  hand,  but  in  my  wrist",
this  has  the  consequence  that  the  doctor  examines  the  wrist.  But
what difference does  it make if I  say that I  feel the hardness  of the
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note Merge all Excel sheets to one PDF file in VB Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
add hyperlink to pdf in preview; add email link to pdf
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
pdf edit hyperlink; add hyperlink pdf
i6ze 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS
object in the tip of the stick or in my hand?  Does what I say mean
"It is as if I had nerve-endings in the tip of the stick?" In what sense is it
like that?—Well, I am at any rate inclined to say "I feel the  hardness
etc. in the tip of the stick."  What goes with this is that when I touch
the  object I  look not  at my hand but at the  tip  of the  stick;  that I
describe  what  I  feel  by  saying  "I  feel  something  hard  and  round
there"—not "I feel a pressure against the  tips  of my thumb, middle
finger,  and  index  finger . . . ."  If,  for  example,  someone  asks  me
"What  are  you  now  feeling  in  the  fingers  that  hold  the  probe?"  I
might reply: "I don't know——I feel something hard and rough over
there."
627.  Examine the following description of a voluntary action:  "I
form the decision to pull the bell at 5 o'clock, and when it strikes 5, my
arm makes this movement."—Is that the correct description, and not
this one: "..... and when it strikes 5, I raise my arm"?——One
would like to supplement the first description: "and seel my arm goes
up when it strikes  5."  And this "and seel" is precisely what doesn't
belong here.  I do not say "See, my arm is going upl" when I raise it.
628.  So  one  might say:  voluntary  movement is  marked  by the
absence of surprise.  And now  I do not mean you  to ask "But why
isn't one surprised here?"
629.  When people talk about the possibility of foreknowledge of
the future they always forget the fact of the prediction of one's own
voluntary movements.
630.  Examine these two language-games:
(a)  Someone  gives  someone,  else  the  order  to  make  particular
movements  with his  arm,  or to  assume  particular  bodily  positions
(gymnastics  instructor  and  pupil).  And  here  is  a  variation  of this
language-game:  the pupil gives himself orders and then carries them
out.
(b)  Someone observes certain regular processes—for example, the
reactions of different metals to acids—and thereupon makes predictions
about the reactions that will occur in certain particular cases.
There is an evident kinship between these two language-games, and
also  a  fundamental  difference.  In  both  one  might  call  the  spoken
words  "predictions".  But  compare  the  training  which  leads  to  the
first technique with the training for the second one.
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I
163*
631.  "I  am going  to  take  two  powders  now,  and  in  half-an-hour
I shall be  sick."—It explains nothing to say that in  the first case I am
the agent, in the second merely the observer.  Or that in  the  first  case
I  see  the  causal  connexion  from inside,  in  the  second  from  outside.
And much else to the same effect.
Nor  is  it  to  the  point  to  say  that  a  prediction  of the  first  kind  is
no  more infallible than  one of the  second kind.
It was not on the ground of observations  of my behaviour that I
said I was going to take two powders.  The antecedents of this proposi-
tion were different.  I mean the thoughts, actions and so on which led
up  to  it.  And  it  can  only  mislead  you  to  say:  "The  only  essential
presupposition  of your utterance was just your decision."
632.  I  do  not  want  to  say  that in  the  case  of the  expression  of
intention "I am going to take two powders" the prediction is a cause—
and  its  fulfilment  the  effect.  (Perhaps  a  physiological  investigation
could determine this.)  So much, however, is true: we can often predict
a  man's  actions  from  his  expression  of  a  decision.  An  important
language-game.
633.  "You were interrupted a while  ago;  do you still know what
you were  going  to  say?"—If I  do  know  now,  and  say  it—does  that
mean  that  I  had  already  thought  it  before,  only  not  said  it?  No.
Unless you take the certainty with which I continue the interrupted
sentence as a criterion of the thought's already having been completed
at that time.—But,  of course,  the  situation and the  thoughts  which I
had  contained  all  sorts  of  things  to  help  the  continuation  of  the
sentence.
634.  When I continue the interrupted sentence and say that this was
how I had been going to  continue  it, this is  like following  out a line
of thought  from brief notes.
Then don't I interpret the notes?  Was only one continuation possible
in these circumstances?  Of course not.  But I did not choose  between
interpretations.  I remembered  that I was going to say this.
635.  "I was going to say .....  "—You remember various details.
But not even all  of them together  shew your intention.  It  is  as if a
snapshot of a scene had been taken, but only a few scattered details of
it were to be  seen:  here a hand,  there a bit  of a  face,  or  a hat—the
rest is dark.  And now it is as if we knew quite certainly what the whole
picture  represented.  As if I  could  read  the  darkness.
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Signatures. Ability to get word count of PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark
add hyperlink to pdf acrobat; add hyperlinks to pdf
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
signature; Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit. Support outline; More about PDF Hyperlink Edit ▶. PDF Metadata Edit. Support
adding a link to a pdf in preview; clickable pdf links
X
6
4
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
636.  These 'details'  are not  irrelevant  in the sense  in which  other
circumstances  which  I  can  remember  equally  well  are  irrelevant.
But if I tell someone "For a moment I was going to say . . . ." he does
not learn those details from this, nor need he guess them.  He need
not know, for instance, that I had already opened my mouth to speak.
But he can  'fill out the picture' in this way.  (And this capacity is part
of understanding what I tell him.)
637.  "I know exactly what I was going to say!"  And yet I did not
say it.—And yet I don't read it off from some other process which took
place then and which I remember.
Nor am I interpreting that situation and its antecedents.  For I don't
consider them and  don't  judge them.
638.  How does it come about that in spite of this I am inclined to
see an interpretation in saying "For a moment I was going to deceive
him"?
"How can you be certain that for the space of a moment you were
going  to  deceive him?  Weren't  your actions  and  thoughts  much too
rudimentary?"
For can't the evidence be too scanty?  Yes, when one follows it up
it seems extraordinarily scanty; but isn't this because one is taking no
account  of the  history  of  this  evidence?  Certain  antecedents  were
necessary for  me to  have had a momentary  intention  of pretending
to someone else that I was unwell.
If someone says "For a moment . . . . . " is he really only describing
a momentary process?
But not even the whole story was  my evidence for  saying "For a
moment  . . . . . "
639.  One would like to say that an opinion develops.  But there is a
mistake in this too.
640.  "This thought ties on to thoughts which I have had before."—
How does it do so?  Through a feeling  of such a tie?  But how can a
feeling  really  tie  thoughts  together?—The  word  "feeling"  is  very
misleading here.  But it is  sometimes possible to  say with  certainty:
"This  thought  is connected  with those  earlier thoughts",  and yet be
unable to shew the connexion.  Perhaps that comes later.
641.  "My intention was no less certain as it was than it would have
been if I  had said  'Now I'll deceive him'."—But if you  had  said the
words, would you necessarily have meant them quite seriously?  (Thus
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
165*
the most explicit expression of intention is by itself insufficient evidence
of intention.)
642.  "At  that  moment  I  hated  him."—What  happened  here?
Didn't  it  consist  in  thoughts,  feelings,  and  actions?  And  if I  were
to rehearse that moment to myself I should assume a particular expres-
sion, think of certain happenings, breathe in a particular way, arouse
certain feelings in myself.  I might think up a conversation,  a whole
scene  in  which  that  hatred flared up.  And  I  might  play  this  scene
through  with  feelings  approximating  to  those  of  a  real  occasion.
That I have actually experienced something of the sort will naturally
help me to do so.
643.  If I now become ashamed of this incident, I am ashamed of
the whole thing: of the words, of the poisonous tone, etc. .
644.  "I am not ashamed  of what  I  did  then,  but  of the  intention
which I had."—And didn't the intention lie also  in what I did?  What
justifies the shame?  The whole history of the incident.
645.  "For a moment I meant to  ...  ."  That is, I had a particular
feeling, an inner experience; and I remember it.——And now remem-
ber quite precisely \  Then the 'inner experience'  of intending seems to
vanish again.  Instead one remembers  thoughts,  feelings,  movements,
and  also  connexions  with earlier  situations.
It is  as  if one had altered the adjustment  of a microscope.  One  did
not see before what is now in focus.
646.  "Well,  that  only  shews  that  you have  adjusted  your micro-
scope wrong.  You were supposed to look at a particular section of the
culture, and you are seeing a different one."
There  is  something  right  about  that.  But  suppose  that  (with  a
particular adjustment of the lenses) I did remember a single sensation;
how have I the right to say that it is what I call the "intention"?  It
might be that (for example) a particular tickle accompanied every one of
my intentions.
647.  What  is  the  natural  expression  of an  intention?—Look  at  a
cat when it stalks a bird; or a beast when it wants to escape.
((Connexion with propositions  about sensations.))
648.  "I no longer remember the words I used, but I remember my
intention  precisely;  I  meant  my words  to quiet him."  What does  my
memory shew  me; what does it bring before my mind?  Suppose it did
l66e
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
nothing but suggest those words  to me!—and perhaps  others  which
fill out the picture still more exactly.—("I don't remember my words
any more, but I certainly remember their spirit.")
649.  "So if a man has not learned a language, is he unable to have
certain  memories?"  Of  course—he  cannot  have  verbal  memories,
verbal wishes or fears, and so on.  And memories etc., in language, are
not mere threadbare representations of the real experiences; for is what
is linguistic not an experience?
650.  We say a dog is afraid his master will beat him; but not, he is
afraid his master will beat him to-morrow.  Why not?
651.  "I remember that I  should have been glad then to stay still
longer."—What picture of this wish came before my mind?  None at
all.  What I see in my memory allows no conclusion as to my feelings.
And yet I remember quite clearly that they were there.
652.  "He  measured  him  with  a  hostile  glance  and  said ....'*
The reader of the narrative understands this;  he has  no doubt in his
mind.  Now you say: "Very well, he supplies the meaning, he guesses
it."—Generally speaking: no.  Generally speaking he supplies nothing,
guesses nothing.—But it is also possible that the hostile glance and the
words later prove to have been pretence, or that the reader is kept in
doubt whether they are so or not, and so that he really does guess at a
possible interpretation.—But then the  main  thing he  guesses  at is  a
context.  He says to himself for example: The two men who are here
so hostile to one another are in reality friends, etc. etc.
(("If you want to understand a sentence,  you have  to imagine  the
psychical  significance, the states of mind involved."))
653.  Imagine  this  case:  I  tell  someone  that  I  walked  a  certain
route, going by a map which I had  prepared beforehand.  Thereupon
I shew him the map, and it consists of lines on a piece of paper; but I
cannot  explain  how  these  lines  are  the  map  of  my  movements,  I
cannot tell  him any rule for  interpreting the  map.  Yet I  did follow
the  drawing  with  all  the  characteristic  tokens  of  reading  a  map.
I  might  call  such  a  drawing  a  'private'  map;  or  the  phenomenon
that I have described "following a private map".  (But this expression
would, of course, be very easy to misunderstand.)
Could I now say: "I read off my having then meant to do  such-and-
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
1676
such,  as if from a map, although there  is  no  map"?  But that means
nothing but: I am now inclined to say  "I read the intention  of  acting
thus in certain states of mind which I remember."
654.  Our mistake is to look for an explanation where we ought to
look  at  what  happens  as  a  'proto-phenomenon'.  That  is,  where  we
ought to have said: this language-game is played.
655.  The  question is  not  one  of explaining  a language-game  by
means of our experiences, but  of noting a language-game.
656.  What  is  the  purpose  of telling  someone  that  a  time  ago I
had such-and-such a wish?—Look on the language-game as the. primary
thing.  And  look  on  the  feelings,  etc.,  as  you  look  on  a  way  of
regarding  the language-game,  as  interpretation.
It  might  be  asked:  how  did  human  beings  ever  come  to  make
the verbal  utterances  which  we  call  reports  of  past  wishes  or  past
intentions?
657.  Let us imagine  these utterances  always taking this form:  "I
said to myself: 'if only I could stay longer I* "  The purpose of such a
statement might be to acquaint someone with my reactions.  (Compare
the grammar of "mean" and "vouloir dire".)
658.  Suppose we expressed the fact that a man  had  an intention
by saying  "He  as  it were  said  to  himself 'I will. . . .' "—That  is  the
picture.  And now I want to know: how does one employ the expres-
sion "as it were to say something to oneself"?  For it does not mean:
to say something to oneself.
659.  Why do I want to tell him about an intention too, as well as
telling him what 1 did?—Not because the intention was also something
which  was  going  on  at  that  time.  But  because  I  want  to  tell  him
something  about myself,  which  goes  beyond  what  happened  at  that
time.
I reveal to him something of myself when I tell him what I was going
to do.—Not, however, on grounds  of self-observation, but by way of
a  response  (it  might  also  be  called  an  intuition).
660.  The grammar of the expression "I was then going to say . . . ."
is related to that of the expression "I could then have gone on."
In  the one  case  I  remember  an intention,  in the  other  I  remember
having understood.
i68e
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
661.  I remember having meant him.  Am I remembering a process
or state?—When did it begin, what was its course; etc.?
662.  In  an  only  slightly  different  situation,  instead  of silently
beckoning, he would have said to someone "Tell N. to come to me."
One can now say that the words "I wanted N. to come to me" describe
the state of my mind at that time; and again one may not say so.
663.  If I say "I meant him" very likely a picture comes to my mind,
perhaps of how I looked at him, etc.; but the picture is only like an
illustration to a story.  From it alone it would mostly be impossible
to conclude anything at all; only when one knows the story does one
know the significance of the picture.
664.  In the use of words one might distinguish 'surface grammar'
from 'depth  grammar'.  What immediately  impresses itself upon  us
about the use of a word is the way it is used in the construction of the
sentence, the part of its use—one  might  say—that  can  be  taken  in
by the ear.——And now compare the depth grammar, say of the word
"to mean", with what its surface grammar would lead us to suspect.
No wonder we find it difficult to know our way about.
665.  Imagine someone pointing to his cheek with an expression of
pain  and  saying  "abracadabra!"—We  ask  "What  do  you  mean?"
And he answers "I meant toothache".—You at once think to yourself:
How can one 'mean toothache' by that word?  Or what did it mean  to
mean pain by that word? And yet, in a different context, you would
have asserted that the mental activity of meaning  such-and-such was
just what was most important in using language.
But—can't I  say "By  'abracadabra' I mean toothache"?  Of course
I can; but this is a definition; not a description of what goes on in me
when I utter the word.
666.  Imagine  that  you  were  in  pain  and  were  simultaneously
hearing  a  nearby  piano  being  tuned.  You  say  "It'll  soon  stop."
It certainly makes quite a difference whether you mean the pain or the
piano-tuning!—Of course;  but  what  does  this  difference  consist  in?
I admit, in many cases some direction of the attention will correspond
to your meaning one thing or another, just as a look often does, or a
gesture, or a way of shutting one's eyes which might be called "looking
into  oneself".
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I 
i6
9
«
667.  Imagine someone simulating pain, and then saying "It'll get
better  soon".  Can't  one  say  he  means  the  pain?  and  yet he  is  not
concentrating  his  attention  on  any  pain.—And  what  about  when  I
finally say "It's stopped now"?
668.  But can't one also lie in this way: one says "It'll stop soon",
and means pain—but when asked "What did you mean?" one answers
"The noise in the next room"?  In this sort of  case one may say: "I
was going to answer.... but thought better of it and did answer ..... "
669.  One can refer to an object when speaking by pointing to it.
Here pointing is a part of the language-game.  And now it seems to us
as  if one  spoke of a sensation by directing one's  attention to it.  But
where  is  the analogy?  It evidently lies in the fact that one can point
to a thing by looking  or listening.
But  in  certain  circumstances,  even pointing   to  the  object  one  is
talking about may be quite inessential to the language-game, to one's
thought.
670.  Imagine that you were telephoning someone and you said to
him: "This table is too tall", and pointed to the table.  What is the
role of pointing here? Can I say: I mean  the table in question by pointing
to it?  What is this pointing for, and what are these words and what-
ever else may accompany them for?
671.  And what do I point to by the inner activity of listening?  To
the  sound  that  comes  to  my  ears,  and  to  the  silence  when  I  hear
nothing
Listening  as  it  were looks for  an  auditory  impression  and  hence
can't point to it, but only to the place  where it is looking for it.
672.  If a receptive attitude is  called a kind  of 'pointing' to  some-
thing—then that something is not the sensation which we get by means
of it.
673.  The  mental attitude  doesn't 'accompany  what is said in the
sense in which a gesture accompanies it.  (As a man can travel alone,
and  yet  be  accompanied  by  my good  wishes;  or as  a  room  can  be
empty,  and  yet full of light.)
674.  Does  one say, for  example:  "I  didn't really  mean  my  pain
just now; my mind wasn't on it enough for that?"  Do I ask myself,
say:  "What  did  I  mean  by  this  word  just  now?  My attention  was
divided between  my pain and the noise—"?
I?0
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
675.  "Tell  me,  what was  going on in  you when  you  uttered  the
words  . .  .  .?"—The  answer  to  this  is  not:  "I  was  meaning ....  ."I
676.  "I meant this by that word" is a statement which is differently
used from one about an affection of the mind.
677.  On the other hand: "When you were swearing just now, did
you really mean it?"  This is perhaps as much as to say:  "Were you
really angry?"—And the  answer  may  be given as  a result of intro-
spection  and  is  often  some  such  thing  as:  "I  didn't  mean  it  very
seriously", "I meant it half jokingly" and so on.  There are differences
of degree  here.
And  one  does  indeed also say "I was half thinking of him when I
said that."
678.  What does this act of meaning (the pain, or the piano-tuning)
consist  in?  No  answer  comes—for  the answers  which at first sight
suggest themselves are of no use.—"And yet at the time I meant the
one thing and not the other."  Yes,—now you have only repeated with
emphasis something which no one has contradicted anyway.
679.  "But can you doubt that you meant //for?"—No; but neither
can I be certain of it, know it.
680.  When you tell me that you cursed and meant N. as you did
so  it  is  all one  to  me  whether  you  looked  at  a picture  of him,  or
imagined him, uttered his name, or what.  The conclusions from this
fact  that  interest  me  have  nothing  to  do  with  these  things.  On
the  other  hand, however, someone  might explain to me that cursing
was effective only when one had a clear image of the man or spoke his
name  out loud.  But we  should,not say  "The  point  is  how the  man
who is cursing means his victim."
681.  Nor, of course, does one ask: "Are you sure that you cursed
him, that the connexion with him was established?"
Then this connexion must be very easy to establish, if one can be
so sure of it? I  Can know that it doesn't fail of its object I—Well, can
it  happen  to  me,  to  intend to  write to  one person  and in  fact write
to another?  and how might it happen?
682.  "You said, 'It'll stop soon'.—Were you thinking of the noise
or of your pain?"  If he answers "I was thinking of the piano-tuning"—
is he observing that the connexion existed, or is he making it by means
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I 
i
7
of these words?—Can't I say both?  If what he said was true, didn't the
connexion exist—and is he not for all that making one which did not
exist?
683.  I draw a head.  You ask "Whom is that supposed to repre-
sent?"—I:  "It's supposed to be N."—You:  "But it doesn't look like
him; if anything, it's rather like M."—When I said it represented N.—
was I establishing a connexion or reporting one?  And what connexion
did exist?
684.  What is there in favour of saying that my words describe an
existing connexion?  Well,  they  relate to various  things  which didn't
simply make their appearance with the words.  They say, for example,
that I should have  given a particular answer then, if I had been asked.
And even if this is  only conditional, still it does say something about
the past.
685.  "Look  for  A"  does  not  mean  "Look  for  B";  but  I  may  do
just the same thing in obeying the two orders.
To  say  that  something  different  must  happen  in  the  two  cases
would  be  like  saying  that  the  propositions  "Today  is  my  birthday"
and "My birthday is on April 26th" must refer to different days, because
they do not make the same sense.
686.  "Of course I meant B; I didn't think of A at all 1"
"I  wanted  B  to  come  to  me,  so  as  to . . ."—All  this  points  to a
wider  context.
687.  Instead  of "I meant him" one can, of course, sometimes say
"I thought of him";  sometimes  even  "Yes, we were speaking of him."
Ask yourself what 'speaking of him' consists in.
688.  In certain  circumstances  one can say "As  I was speaking,  I
felt I was saying it tojou".  But I should not say this if I were in any
case  talking with  you.
689.  "I am thinking of N."  "I am speaking of N."
How do I speak of him?  I say, for instance, "I must go and see N
today"——But surely that is not enough!  After all, when I  say "N"
I might mean various people of this name.—"Then there must surely
be a further, different connexion between my talk and N, for otherwise
I should still not have meant HIM.
Certainly  such  a  connexion  exists.  Only  not  as  you  imagine  it:
namely by means of a mental mechanism.
(One compares "meaning him" with "aiming at him".)
i
7
2« 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
690.  What about the case where I at one time make an apparently
innocent  remark  and  accompany  it with a furtive  sidelong  glance  at
someone;  and  at  another  time,  without  any  such  glance,  speak  of
somebody present openly, mentioning his name—am I really thinking
specially about him as I use his name?
691.  When  I  make  myself a sketch  of N's face from  memory, I
can  surely  be  said  to mean   him  by  my  drawing.  But  which  of the
processes taking place while I draw (or before or afterwards) could I
call meaning him?
For one would naturally like to say: when he meant him, he aimed
at him.  But how is anyone doing that, when he calls someone else's face
to  mind?
I mean, how does he call HIM to mind?
H.on> does he call himt
692.  Is it correct for someone to say: "When I gave you this rule,
I  meant you to . . .. . in this  case"?  Even  if he did not think of this
case at all as he gave the rule?  Of course it is correct.  For "to mean it"
did not  mean:  to  think  of it.  But now the problem is:  how are  we
to  judge  whether  someone  meant  such-and-such?—The  fact  that  he
has,  for example,  mastered a particular  technique  in  arithmetic and
algebra, and that he taught someone else the expansion of a series in the
usual way, is such a criterion.
693.  "When I  teach  someone the formation  of the  series  ....  I
surely mean him to write  ....  at the hundredth place."—Quite right;
you mean it.  And evidently without necessarily even  thinking of it.
This  shews  you  how  different  the  grammar  of  the  verb  "to  mean"
is  from  that  of  "to  think".  And  nothing  is  more  wrong-headed
than calling meaning a mental activity!  Unless, that is, one is setting
out to  produce  confusion.  (It would also be possible to  speak  of an
activity  of  butter  when  it  rises  in  price,  and  if  no  problems  are
produced by this it is harmless.)
PART  II
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested