One can imagine an animal angry, frightened, unhappy, happy,
startled.  But hopeful?  And why not?
A dog believes his master is at the door.  But can he also believe his
master will come the day after to-morrow?—And what can he not do
here?—How do I do it?—How am I supposed to answer this?
Can only those hope who can talk?  (3nly those who have mastered
the use of a language.  That is to say, the phenomena of hope are modes
of this complicated form of life.  (If a concept refers to a character of
human handwriting, it has no application to beings that do not write.)
"Grief" describes a pattern which recurs, with different variations,
in the weave of our life.  If a man's bodily expression of sorrow and
of joy alternated, say with the ticking of a clock, here we should not
have the characteristic formation of the pattern  of sorrow  or of the
pattern of joy.
"For  a  second  he  felt  violent  pain."—Why  does  it  sound  queer
to say: "For a second he felt deep grief"?  Only because it so seldom
happens?
But don't you feel  grief now?  ("But aren't you playing chess «<?»>?"
The answer may be affirmative, but that does not make the concept
of  grief  any  more  like  the  concept of  a  sensation.—The question
was  really, of course,  a temporal  and personal one, not the logical
question which we wanted to raise.
"I must tell you: I am frightened."
"I must tell you: it makes me shiver."—
And one can say this in a smiling tone of voice too.
And do you mean to tell me he doesn't feel it?  How else does he
know it?—But even when he says it as a piece of information he does
not learn it from his sensations.
For  think  of the  sensations  produced by  physically  shuddering:
the words "it makes me shiver" are themselves such a shuddering re-
action; and if I hear and feel them as I utter them, this belongs among
the rest of those sensations.  Now why should the wordless shudder
be the ground of the verbal one?
1740
ii
In  saying  "When  I heard  this  word,  it  meant  ....  to  me"  one
refers to a point of time and to a way of using the word.  (Of course, it is
this combination that we fail to grasp.)
And  the expression  "I  was  then  going  to  say .... ."  refers to a
point of time and to an action.
I  speak  of the essential references  of the utterance in order to dis-
tinguish them from other peculiarities of the expression we use.  The
references that are essential to an utterance are the ones which would
make us translate some otherwise alien form of expression into this,
our customary form.
If you were unable to say that the word "till" could be both a verb
and a conjunction, or to construct sentences, in which it was now the
one and now  the other, you would  not  be able to manage  simple
schoolroom  exercises.  But  a  schoolboy  is  not  asked  to conceive  the
word in one way or another out of any context, or to report how he
has  conceived it.
The words "the rose is red" are meaningless if the word "is" has the
meaning "is identical with".—Does this mean: if you say this sentence
and mean the "is" as the sign of identity, the sense disintegrates?
We take a sentence and tell someone the  meaning of each of its
words;  this  tells him how to  apply them and so how to apply the
sentence too.  If we had chosen a senseless sequence of words instead
of the sentence, he would not learn how to apply the sequence. And if we
explain the word "is" as the sign of identity, then he does not learn
how to use the sentence "the rose is red".
And yet there is something right about this 'disintegration of the
sense'.  You get it in the following example: one might tell someone:
if you want to pronounce the salutation "Haill" expressively, you had
better not think of hailstones as you say it.
Experiencing  a  meaning  and  experiencing  a  mental  image.  "In
both  cases", we should like to  say,  "we  are experiencing something,
only something different. A different content is proffered—is present—
to consciousness."—What is the content of the experience of imagin-
ing?  The answer is a picture, or a description.  And what is the content
175-
i
Pdf email link - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink to pdf in; adding links to pdf
Pdf email link - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
check links in pdf; add hyperlink pdf document
i
7
6e 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  Ilii
of the experience of meaning?  I don't know what I am supposed to
say to this.—If there is any sense in the above remark, it is that the
two concepts are related like those of 'red' and 'blue'; and that is wrong.
Can one keep hold of an understanding of meaning as one can keep
hold of a mental image?  That is, if one meaning of a word suddenly
strikes me,—can it also stay there in my mind?
"The whole scheme presented itself to my mind in a flash and stayed
there like that for five minutes."  Why does this sound odd?  One
would like to think: what flashed on me and what stayed there in my
mind can't have been the same.
I exclaimed "Now I have it!"—a sudden start, and then I was able
to set the scheme forth in detail.  What is supposed to have stayed
in this case?  A picture, perhaps.  But "Now I have it" did not mean,
I have the picture.
If a meaning of a word has occurred to you and you have not for-
gotten it again, you can now use the word in such-and-such a way.
If the meaning has occurred to you, now you know  it, and the know-
ing began when it occurred to you.  Then how is it like an experience
of imagining something?
If I say "Mr. Scot is not a Scot", I mean the first "Scot" as a proper
name, the second one as a common name.  Then do different things
have to go on in my mind at the first and second "Scot"?  (Assuming
that I am not uttering the sentence 'parrot-wise'.)—Try to mean the
first "Scot" as a common name and the second one as a proper name.—
How is it done?  When / do it, I blink with the effort as I try to parade
the right meanings before my mind in saying the words.—But do I
parade the meanings of the words before my mind when I make the
ordinary use of them?
When I say the sentence with this exchange of meanings I feel that
its sense disintegrates.—Well, / feel it, but the person I am saying it to
does not.  So what harm is done?——"But the point is, when one
utters  the  sentence  in  the  usual  way  something else,  quite  definite,
takes place."—What takes place is not this 'parade of the meanings
before one's mind'.
ill
What makes my image of him into an image of him?
Not its looking like him.
The same question applies to the expression "I see him now vividly
before me" as to the image.  What makes this utterance into an utter-
ance about him?— Nothing in it or simultaneous with it ('behind it').
If you want to know whom he meant, ask him.
(But it is also possible for a face to come before my mind, and even
for me to be able to draw it,  without my  knowing whose it  is  or
where I have seen it.)
Suppose,  however,  that  someone  were to  draw  while  he  had  an
image or instead of having it, though it were only with his finger in
the air.  (This might be called "motor imagery.")  He could be asked:
"Whom does that represent?"  And his answer would be decisive.—
It is quite as if he had given a verbal description: and such a description
can also simply take the place of the image.
177*
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
copy and email the secure download link to the assistance, please contact us via email (support@rasteredge & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
clickable links in pdf from word; add hyperlink to pdf online
RasterEdge Product Licensing Discount
s). After confirming the informations provided, we will send you an email that contains price(s) at a discount and the online order link for new licensing.
pdf email link; add links to pdf
Suppose we were observing the movement of a point (for example,
a point of light on a screen).  It might be possible to draw important
consequences  of the most various kinds  from the behaviour of this
point.  And what a variety of observations can be made here 1—The
path of the point and certain of its characteristic measures (amplitude
and wave-length for instance), or the velocity and the law according
to which it varies, or the number or position of the places at which it
changes discontinuously, or the curvature of the path at these places,
and innumerable other things.—Any of these features of its behaviour
might be the only one to interest us.  We might, for example, be in-
different to everything about its movements except for the number of
loops it made in a certain time.—And if we were interested, not in just
one such feature, but in several, each might yield us special information,
different in kind from all the rest.  This is how it is with the behaviour
of man; with the different characteristic features which we observe in
this behaviour.
Then psychology treats of behaviour, not of the mind?
What  do  psychologists  record?—What do  they  observe?  Isn't it
the  behaviour of human beings,  in  particular their  utterances?  But
these are not about behaviour.
"I noticed that he was out of humour."  Is this a report about his
behaviour  or  his  state  of mind?  ("The  sky  looks  threatening":  is
this about the present or the future?)  Both; not side-by-side, however,
but about the one via the other.
A  doctor  asks:  "How  is  he  feeling?"  The  nurse  says:  "He  is
groaning".  A report on his behaviour.  But need there be any question
for them whether the groaning is really genuine, is really the expression
of anything? Might they not, for example, draw the conclusion "If he
^ioans, we must give him more analgesic"—without suppressing a
middle term?  Isn't the point the service to which they put the descrip-
tion  of behaviour?
"But then they make a tacit presupposition."  Then what we do in-
our language-game always tests on a tacit presupposition.
179*
iv
"I believe that he is suffering."——Do I also believe that he isn't
an automaton?
It would go against the grain to use the word in both connexions.
(Or is it like this: I believe that he is suffering, but am certain that
he is not an automaton? Nonsense I)
Suppose I say of a friend: "He isn't an automaton".—What informa-
tion is conveyed by this, and to whom would it be information?  To
a human being  who  meets  him  in  ordinary  circumstances?  What
information could it give him?  (At the very most that this man always
behaves like a human being, and not occasionally like a machine.)
"I believe that he is not an automaton", just like that, so far makes
no sense.
My attitude towards him is an attitude towards a soul.  I am not of
the opinion that he has a soul.
Religion  teaches  that  the  soul  can  exist  when  the  body  has  dis-
integrated.  Now do I understand this teaching?—Of course I under-
stand it——I can imagine plenty of things in connexion with it.  And
haven't pictures of these things been painted?  And why should such
a picture be only an imperfect rendering of the spoken doctrine? Why
should it not do the same service as the words?  And it is the service
which is the point.
If the picture of thought in the head can force itself upon us, then
why not much more that of thought in the soul?
The human body is the best picture of the human soul.
And how about such an expression as: "In my heart I understood
when you said that", pointing to one's heart?  Does one, perhaps, not
mean this gesture? Of course one means it. Or is one conscious of
using a mere figure? Indeed not.—It is not a figure that we choose,
not a simile, yet it is a figurative expression.
178*
V
RasterEdge Product Renewal and Update
4. Order email. Our support team will send you the purchase link. HTML5 Viewer for .NET; XDoc.Windows Viewer for .NET; XDoc.Converter for .NET; XDoc.PDF for .NET;
add link to pdf; pdf link to attached file
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create PDF file from PowerPoint free online without email.
accessible links in pdf; add hyperlinks pdf file
i8o«
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  IIv
I describe a psychological experiment: the apparatus, the questions of
the experimenter, the actions and replies of the subject—and then I say
that it is a scene in a play.—Now everything is different.  So it will be
said: If this experiment were described in the same way in a book on
psychology,  then  the  behaviour  described  would  be  understood  as
the  expression  of  something  mental  just  because  it  is presupposed
that the subject is not taking  us  in,  hasn't  learnt the  replies  by heart,
and  other  things  of the  kind.—So  we  are making  a  presupposition?
Should we ever  really express  ourselves  like this:  "Naturally I  am
presupposing  that ....  ."?—Or  do  we  not  do  so  only  because  the
other person  already  knows  that?
Doesn't a presupposition imply a doubt?  And doubt may be entirely
lacking.  Doubting has an end.
It is like the relation:  physical object—sense-impressions.  Here we
have two different language-games and a complicated relation between
them.—If you try to reduce their relations to a simple formula you go
wrong.
vi
Suppose someone said: every familiar word, in a book for example,
actually  carries  an  atmosphere  with  it  in  our  minds,  a  'corona'  of
lightly  indicated  uses.—Just  as  if  each  figure  in  a  painting  were
surrounded  by  delicate  shadowy  drawings  of scenes,  as  it  were  in
another dimension,  and in them we saw the figures in different con-
texts.—Only let us take this assumption seriously!—Then we see that
it is not adequate to explain intention,
For if it is like this, if the possible uses of a word do float before us
in half-shades  as we say or hear it—this simply goes for us.  But we
communicate  with  other  people  without  knowing  if  they  have  this
experience  too.
How should we counter someone who told us that with him  under-
standing was an inner process?——How should we counter him if he
said that with him knowing how to play chess was an inner process?—
We should say that when we want to  know  if he  can  play chess we
aren't interested in anything that goes on inside him.—And if he replies
that this is in fact just what we are interested in, that is, we are interested
in whether he can play chess—then we shall have to draw his attention
to the criteria which would demonstrate his capacity, and on the other
hand to the criteria for the 'inner states'.
Even if someone had a particular capacity only when, and only as
long  as,  he  had  a  particular  feeling,  the  feeling  would  not  be  the
capacity.
The meaning of a word is not the experience one has in hearing or
saying  it,  and  the  sense  of a  sentence  is  not a complex  of such  ex-
periences.—(How do the meanings of the individual words  make up
the sense of the sentence "I still haven't seen him yet"?)  The sentence
is composed of the words, and that is enough.
Though—one would like to say—every word has a different character
in different contexts, at the same time there is one character it always
has: a single physiognomy.  It looks at us.—But a face in  a painting
looks at us too.
Are you sure that there is a single if-feeling, and not perhaps several?
Have  you  tried  saying  the  word  in  a  great  variety  of contexts?  For
181*
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
pdf hyperlink; convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Convert Excel to PDF document free online without email.
add links to pdf acrobat; adding an email link to a pdf
i8
2
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS Hvi
example, when it bears the principal stress of the sentence, and when
the word next to it does.
Suppose we found a man who, speaking of how words felt to him,
told us that "if" and "but" felt the same.— Should we have the right
to disbelieve him?  We might think it strange.  "He doesn't play our
game at all",  one would  like to say.  Or even:  "This is a different
type of man."
If he used  the words  "if" and "but" as we do, shouldn't we think
he understood them as we do?
One misjudges  the psychological interest of the if-feeling if one
regards it as the obvious correlate of a meaning; it needs rather to be
seen in a different context, in that of the special circumstances in which
it occurs.
Does a person never have  the  if-feeling when  he  is  not uttering
the word "if"?  Surely it is  at least remarkable if this  cause  alone
produces this feeling.  And this applies generally to the 'atmosphere'
of a word;—why does one regard it so  much as a matter of course
that only this word has this atmosphere?
The if-feeling is not a feeling which accompanies  the  word  "if".
The if-feeling would have to be compared with the special 'feeling*
which a musical phrase gives  us.  (One sometimes describes such a
feeling by saying "Here it is as if a conclusion were being drawn", or
"I should like to say * hence .....'" , or "Here I should always like to
make a gesture—" and then one makes it.)
But can this feeling be separated from the phrase?  And yet it is not
the phrase itself, for that can be heard without the feeling.
Is it in this respect like the 'expression' with which the phrase is
played?
We say this passage gives us a quite special feeling.  We sing it to
ourselves, and make a certain movement, and also perhaps have some
special sensation. But in  a different context we should not recognize
these accompaniments—the movement, the sensation—at all. They are
quite empty except just when we are singing this passage.
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS Hvi
18}*
"I sing it with a quite particular expression."  This expression is
not something that can be separated from the passage.  It is a different
concept.  (A different game.)
The experience is this passage played like this (that is, as I am doing
it, for instance; a description could only hint at it).
Thus the atmosphere that is inseparable from its object—is not an
atmosphere.
Closely associated things, things which we have associated, seem to fit
one another.  But what is this seeming to fit? How is their seeming to
fit manifested? Perhaps like this: we cannot imagine the man who had
this name, this face, this handwriting, not to have produced these works,
but perhaps quite different ones instead (those of another great man).
We cannot imagine it?  Do we try?—
Here  is  a  possibility:  I  hear  that  someone  is  painting  a  picture
"Beethoven writing the ninth symphony".  I could easily imagine the
kind  of thing such a picture would shew us.  But suppose someone
wanted to represent what Goethe would have looked like writing the
ninth symphony?  Here  I  could  imagine nothing  that  would  not  be
embarrassing and ridiculous.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF. VB.NET class source code for .NET framework.
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; adding a link to a pdf
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
and .docx. Create editable Word file online without email. Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word for mail merge. C# source
clickable links in pdf files; active links in pdf
Vll
People who on waking tell us certain incidents (that they have been
in such-and-such places, etc.).  Then we teach them the expression
"I dreamt", which precedes the narrative.  Afterwards I sometimes
ask them  "did  you  dream  anything  last  night?"  and  am answered
yes or no, sometimes with an account of a dream, sometimes not.  That
is the language-game. (I have assumed here that I do not dream myself.
But then, nor do I  ever  have  the  feeling  of an  invisible  presence;
other people do, and I can question them about their experiences.)
Now  must  I  make  some  assumption  about  whether  people  are
deceived by their memories  or not;  whether they  really  had  these
images while they slept, or whether it merely seems so to them on
waking?  And what meaning has this question?—And what interest?
Do we ever ask ourselves this when someone is telling us his dream?
And if not—is it because we are sure his memory won't have deceived
him?  (And  suppose  it  were  a  man  with  a  quite  specially  bad
memory?—)
Does this mean that it is nonsense ever to raise the question whether
dreams really take place during sleep, or are a memory phenomenon
of the awakened?  It will turn on the use of the question.
"The mind seems  able to give a word meaning"—isn't this  as if I
were to say "The carbon atoms in benzene seem to lie at the corners of
a hexagon"?  But this is not something that seems to be so; it is  a
picture.
The evolution of the higher animals and of man, and the awakening
of consciousness at a particular level.  The picture is something like
this:  Though  the ether is filled with  vibrations  the world  is  dark.
But one day man opens his seeing eye, and there is light.
What this language primarily describes is a picture.  What is to be
done with the picture, how it is to be used, is still obscure.  Quite
clearly, however, it must be explored if we want to understand the
sense  of what we  are  saying.  But  the  picture  seems  to  spare us
this work: it already points to a particular use.  This is how it takes
us in.
Vlll
"My kinaesthetic sensations advise me of the movement and position
of my limbs."
I let my index finger make an easy pendulum movement of small
amplitude.  I either hardly feel it,  or don't feel it at all.  Perhaps a
little in the tip of the finger, as a slight tension.  (Not at all in the
joint.)  And this sensation advises me of the movement?—for I can
describe the movement exactly.
"But  after  all,  you  must  feel  it,  otherwise  you  wouldn't  know
(without  looking)  how  your  finger was  moving."  But  "knowing"
it only means: being able to describe it.—I may be able to tell the direc-
tion from which a sound comes only because it affects one ear more
strongly than the other, but I don't feel this in my ears; yet it has its
effect: I know  the direction from which the sound comes; for instance,
I look in that direction.
It is the same with the idea that it must be some feature of our pain
that advises us of the whereabouts of the pain in the body, and some
feature of our memory image that tells us the time to which it belongs.
A sensation can advise us of the movement or position of a limb.
(For example, if you do not know, as a normal person does, whether
your arm is stretched out, you might find out by a piercing pain in the
elbow.)—In the same way the character of a pain  can tell us where
the injury is.  (And the yellowness of a photograph how old it is.)
What is the criterion for my learning the shape and colour of an
object from a sense-impression?
What sense-impression? Well, this one; I use words or a picture to
describe it.
And now: what do you feel when your fingers are in this position?—
"How is one to define a feeling? It is something special and indefinable."
But it must be possible to teach the use of the words I
What I am looking for is the grammatical difference.
Let us leave the kinaesthetic feeling out for the moment.—I want to
describe a feeling to someone, and I tell him "Do this
t
and then you*!!
185*
i84
e
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Export PDF from Excel with cell border or no border. Free online Excel to PDF converter without email. Quick integrate online C# source code into .NET class.
add url pdf; c# read pdf from url
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
application. Free online PowerPoint to PDF converter without email. C# source code is provided for .NET WinForms class. Evaluation
pdf link to email; add a link to a pdf
i86« 
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS  Ilviii
get it," and I hold my arm or my head in a particular position.  Now
is this a description of a feeling? and when shall I say that he has under-
stood what feeling I meant?—He will have to give a further description
of the feeling afterwards.  And what kind of description must it be?
I  say  "Do fbis, and  you'll get it".  Can't there be  a  doubt here?
Mustn't there be one, if it is a feeling that is meant?
This looks so; this tastes so; this feels so. "This" and "so" must be
differently explained.
Our interest in a 'feeling' is of a quite particular kind.  It includes,
for instance, the 'degree of the feeling', its 'place', and the extent to
which one feeling can be submerged by another.  (When a movement
is very painful, so that the pain submerges every other slight sensation
in the same place, does this make it uncertain whether you have really
made this movement?  Could it lead you to find out by looking?)
ix
If you observe your own grief, which senses do you use to observe
it?  A particular sense; one that/*?*// grief?  Then do you feel it differently
when you are observing it?  And what is the grief that you are observ-
ing—is it one which is there only while it is being observed?
'Observing' does not produce what is observed.  (That is a concep-
tual statement.)
Again:  I  do  not  'observe'  what  only  comes  into  being  through
observation.  The object of observation is something else.
A touch which was still painful yesterday is no longer so today.
Today I feel the pain only when I think about it,  (That is: in certain
circumstances.)
My grief is no longer the same; a memory which was still unbear-
able to me a year ago is now no longer so.
That is a result of observation.
When do we say that any one is  observing?  Roughly:  when he
puts himself in a favourable position to receive certain impressions in
order (for example) to describe what they tell him.
If you trained someone to emit a particular  sound at the sight of
something red, another at the sight of something yellow, and so on
for  other  colours,  still he would not yet be  describing  objects  by
their colours.  Though he might be a help to us in giving a descrip-
tion.  A description is a representation of a distribution in a space (in
that of time, for instance).
If I  let  my gaze  wander round a room and suddenly it lights on
an object  of a striking red colour, and I say "Redl"—that is not a
description.
Are the words "I am afraid" a description of a state of mind?
I say "I am afraid"; someone else asks me: "What was that?  A cry
of fear; or do you want to tell me how you feel; or is it a reflection on
your present state?"—Could I always give him a clear answer?  Could
I never give him one?
187*
i88« 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  Ilix
We can imagine all sorts of things here, for example:
"No,  no!  I  am afraid!"
"I am afraid.  I am sorry to have to confess it."
"I am still a bit afraid, but no longer as much as before."
"At bottom I  am  still afraid,  though  I  won't  confess  it to myself."
"I torment myself with all sorts of fears."
"Now, just when I should be fearless, I am afraid!"
To  each  of these  sentences  a  special  tone  of voice is  appropriate,
and  a different context.
It would be possible to imagine people who as it were thought much
more definitely than we, and used different words where we use only
one.
W
r
 ask  "What  does  'I  am  frightened'  really  mean,  what  am  I
referring  to  when  I  say  it?"  And  of course we find no answer, or
one  that is  inadequate.
The question is:  "In what sort of context does it occur?"
 can  find  no  answer  if I  try  to  settle  the  question  "What  am  I
referring to?"  "What am I thinking when I say it?" by repeating the
expression of fear and at the same time attending to myself, as it were
observing  my soul  out  of the  corner  of my eye.  In  a concrete case
 can  indeed  ask  "Why  did  I  say  that,  what  did  I  mean  by  it?"—
and I might answer the question too; but not on the ground of observ-
ing what accompanied the speaking.  And my answer would  supple-
ment, paraphrase, the earlier utterance.
What is fear?  What does "being afraid" mean?  If I wanted to define
it at a single shewing—I should play-act fear.
Could I also represent hope in this way?  Hardly.  And what about
belief?
Describing my state  of mind  (of fear,  say) is  something I  do in a
particular  context.  (Just  as  it  takes  a  particular  context  to  make  a
certain action into an experiment.)
Is  it, then, so surprising that I use the same expression in different
games?  And sometimes as it were between the games?
And do I always talk with very definite purpose?—And is what I say
meaningless because I don't?
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS Ilix 
1896
When  it is said in a funeral oration  "We mourn our . . . ."  this is
surely supposed to be an expression of mourning; not to tell anything
to  those who  are present.  But in a prayer at the grave  these words
would in a way be used to tell someone  something.
But here is the problem: a cry, which cannot be called a description,
which  is  more primitive than any description, for all that serves as a
description of the inner life.
A cry is not a description.  But there are transitions.  And the words
"I am afraid" may approximate more, or less, to being a cry.  They may
come quite close to this and also be far removed from it.
We surely do not always  say someone is complaining, because he
says he is in pain.  So the words "I am in pain" may be a cry of com-
plaint, and may be something else.
But if "I am afraid" is not always something like a cry of complaint
and yet sometimes is, then why should it always be a description of a
state of mind?
How did we ever come to use such an expression as "I believe . . . "?
Did we at some time become aware of a phenomenon (of belief)?
Did we observe ourselves and other people and so discover belief?
Moore's paradox can be put like this: the expression "I believe that
this is the case" is used like the assertion "This is the case"; and yet the
hypothesis that I believe this is the case is not used like the hypothesis
that this is the case.
So it looks as if the assertion "I believe" were not the assertion of
what is supposed in the hypothesis "I believe"!
Similarly: the statement "I believe it's going to rain" has a meaning
like, that is to say a use like, "It's going to rain", but the meaning of
"I believed then that it was going to rain", is not like that of "It did
rain  then".
"But surely 'I believed' must tell of just the same thing in the past
as 'I believe' in the present!"—Surely V -1 must mean just the same in
relation to — i, as \A means in relation to i! This means nothing at all.
"At  bottom,  when I  say 'I believe . . .' I  am describing my own
state  of mind—but  this  description  is  indirectly an  assertion  of the
fact believed."—As in certain circumstances I describe a photograph
in order to describe the thing it is a photograph of.
But then I must also be able to say that the photograph is a good
one.  So here too: "I believe it's raining and my belief is reliable, so I
have confidence in it."—In that case  my belief would be a kind of
sense-impression.
One can mistrust one's own senses, but not one's own belief.
If there were a verb meaning 'to believe falsely', it would not have
any significant first person present indicative.
Don't look at it as  a matter of course, but as a most remarkable
thing, that the verbs "believe", "wish", "will" display all the inflexions
possessed by "cut", "chew", "run".-
The language-game of reporting  can be  given  such a turn  that a
report is not meant to inform the hearer about its subject matter but
about the person making the report.
190*
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS Hx 
i
9
ie
It is so when, for instance, a teacher examines a pupil.  (You can
measure to test the ruler.)
Suppose  I  were  to  introduce  some  expression—"I  believe",  for
instance—in this way: it is to be prefixed to reports when they serve
to give information about the reporter.  (So the expression need not
carry with it any suggestion of uncertainty. Remember that the uncer-
tainty of an assertion can be expressed impersonally: "He might come
today".)—"I believe . . . ., and it isn
s
t so" would be a contradiction.
"I believe . . . ." throws light on my state.  Conclusions about my
conduct can be drawn from this expression.  So there is a similarity
here to expressions of emotion, of mood, etc, .
If, however, "I believe it is so" throws light on my state, then so
does the assertion "It is so".  For the sign "I believe" can't do it, can
at the most hint at it.
Imagine a language in which "I believe it is so" is expressed only
by means of the tone of the assertion "It is so".  In this language they
say,  not  "He  believes" but  "He is  inclined  to  say . . . /'  and there
exists also the hypothetical (subjunctive) "Suppose I were inclined
etc.", but not the expression "I am inclined to say".
Moore's  paradox would  not exist  in this  language;  instead  of it,
however, there would be a verb lacking one inflexion.
But this ought not to  surprise us.  Think of the fact that one can
predict one's own  future action by an expression of intention.
I say of someone else "He seems to believe . . . ." and other people
say it of me.  Now, why do I never say it of myself, not even when
others rightly say it of me?—Do I myself not see and hear  myself,
then?—That can be said.
"One feels conviction within oneself, one doesn't infer it from one's
own words or their tone."—What is true here is:  one does not infer
one's  own  conviction  from  one's  own  words;  nor  yet  the  actions
which arise from that conviction.
"Here it looks as if the assertion 'I believe' were not the assertion of
what is supposed in the hypothesis."—So I am tempted to look for a
different development of the verb in the first person present indicative.
This is how I think of it: Believing is a state of mind.  It has duration;
and that independently of the duration of its expression in a sentence,
for example.  So it is a kind of disposition of the believing person.
This is shewn me in the case of someone else by his behaviour; and
X
i
9
z« 
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS IIx
by his words.  And under this head, by the expression "I believe . . .'
as well as by the simple assertion.—What about my own case: how do I
myself recognize my own disposition?—Here it will have been necessary
for me to take notice of myself as others do, to listen to myself talking,
to be able to draw conclusions from what I sayl
My own relation to my words is wholly different from other people's.
That different development of the verb would have been possible,
if only I could say "I seem to believe".
If I listened to the words of my mouth, I might say that someone
else was speaking out of my mouth.
"Judging from what I say, this is what I believe."  Now, it is possible
to think out circumstances in which these words would make sense.
And then it would also be possible for someone to say "It is raining
and I don't believe it", or "It seems to me that my ego believes this,
but it isn't true."  One would have to fill out the picture with behaviour
indicating that two people were speaking through my mouth.
Even in the hypothesis the pattern is not what you think.
When you say "Suppose I believe . . . ." you are presupposing the
whole grammar of the word "to believe", the ordinary use, of which
you are master.—You are not supposing some state of affairs which,
so to speak, a picture presents unambiguously to you, so that you can
tack on to this hypothetical use some assertive use other than the
ordinary one.—You would not know at all what you were supposing
here (i.e. what, for example, would follow from such a supposition),
if you were not already familiar with the use of "believe".
Think of the expression "I say . . . .", for example in "I say it will
rain today", which simply comes to the same thing as the assertion
"It  will . . . .".  "He  says  it  will . . . ."  means  approximately  "He
believes it will . . . .".  "Suppose I say . . . ." does not mean: Suppose
it rains today.
Different  concepts  touch  here  and  coincide  over  a  stretch.  But
you need not think that all lines are circles.
Consider the misbegotten sentence "It may be raining, but it isn't".
And  here  one  should  be  on  one's  guard  against  saying  that  "It
may be raining" really means "I think it'll be raining."  For why not
the other way round, why should not the latter mean the former?
Don't regard a hesitant assertion as an assertion of hesitancy.
xl
Two uses of the word "see".
The one: "What do you see there?"—"I see this" (and then a descrip-
tion, a drawing, a copy).  The other: "I see a likeness between these
two faces"—let the man I tell this to be seeing the faces as clearly as I
do myself.
The importance of this is the difference of category between the two
'objects'  of sight.
The one man might make an accurate drawing of the  two faces,
and the other notice in the drawing the likeness which the former did
not see.
I contemplate a face,  and then suddenly notice its likeness to an-
other.  I see that it has not changed; and yet I see it differently.  I call
this experience "noticing an aspect".
Its causes are of interest to psychologists.
We are interested in the concept and its place among the concepts of
experience.
You  could  imagine  the  illustration
appearing in several places in a book, a text-book for instance.  In the
relevant text something different is in question every time: here a glass
cube, there an inverted open box,  there a wire frame of that  shape,
there three boards forming a solid angle.  Each time the text supplies
the interpretation  of the illustration.
But we can also see the illustration now as one thing now as another.
—So we interpret it, and see it as we interpret it.
Here perhaps we  should like to reply:  The description of what is
got immediately, i.e. of the visual experience, by means of an inter-
pretation—is  an  indirect  description.  "I  see  the  figure  as  a  box"
means: I have a particular visual experience which I have found that
I always have when I interpret the figure as a box or when I look at
I
93
e
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested