WITH ALL THE NEW KNOWLEDGE
you’ve acquired, you’re now ready to
fine-tune your vocabulary and show off your word power. The final section of
this book shows you ways to use slang, confusing words, foreign phrases,
and extra fancy words to beef up your vocabulary and become an extremely
powerful wordsmith.
4
build word power in special ways
S
E
C
T
I
O
N
Pdf edit hyperlink - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlinks to pdf; clickable pdf links
Pdf edit hyperlink - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf link; add page number to pdf hyperlink
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add hyperlink to pdf acrobat; pdf link to attached file
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add hyperlinks to pdf online; adding links to pdf
AS YOU LEARNED
in Lesson 6, English is a relatively young language, and
has derived hundreds of thousands of words from older languages, princi-
pally Latin and Greek. (You may want to look back at that lesson for a quick
review!)
When words were borrowed from older languages and moved into Eng-
lish, they were anglicized—modified and adapted to English pronunciations
and spellings. As a result, they aren’t immediately recognizable as borrow-
ings to anyone but linguists (people who speak several languages fluently);
we think of the words as our own.
There are also many, many words from other, older languages that
moved  directly  into  English.  Sometimes  the  pronunciation  is  modified
slightly, but for the most part, these words were adopted as is, without signifi-
cant changes. Some words feel so natural to us that it takes a moment to real-
ize that they’re technically foreign words. Others keep the pronunciation
from their original language, and are therefore more easily recognized as for-
eign imports.
L
E
S
S
O
N
26
words we’ve adopted
We don’t just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued
other languages down alleyways to beat them unconscious 
and rifle their pockets for new vocabulary.
B
OOKER
T. W
ASHINGTON
(1856–1915)
A
MERICAN EDUCATOR
This lesson focuses on words that originated in other languages but are now
common in English.
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
processing images contained in PDF file. Please click to see details. PDF Hyperlink Edit. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers
adding links to pdf document; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
processing images contained in PDF file. Please click to see details. C#.NET: Edit PDF Hyperlink. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; adding an email link to a pdf
186
build word power in special ways
Knowing the meaning of many words and how to pronounce them is a
sure sign of word power, your goal in reading this book!
Following is a list of words that are direct imports to English. You may
already know some of them. Aids to their pronunciations are included to help
you if needed.
WORDS FROM FOREIGN SOURCES
1. ad hoc (from Latin for for this). Something created right now, or
improvised, for a specific purpose. Hurricane Katrina caused the
ad hoc formation of citizen rescue teams.
2. ad hominem (add-HOHM-eh-nihm). (from Latin for to the man)
An  argument  that  attacks  someone’s  character  rather  than
attacking his argument, appealing to the emotions rather than
the intellect. Political races are too often full of ad hominem attacks
instead of debates on the real issues.
3. camouflage (KAM-uh-flaahj). (from the French for to disguise)
Disguising for protection from an enemy, such as dressing to
blend into the surrounding environment. Clothes designed with a
camouflage pattern have become popular with young people, whether
or not they plan to serve in the military.
4. caveat emptor (KAH-vee-aht em(p)-tor). (from the Latin for let
the buyer beware) The concept that not all sellers can be trusted,
so buyers should carefully judge the quality of what they buy
before they pay. Flea market bargain hunters should remember the
saying caveat emptor every time they think they’ve bought something
for much less than it’s really worth.
5. cocoa. (the Spanish name for the bean of the cacao tree) The
powder ground from roasted cacao beans. Imagine our world
without cocoa: if the Spanish hadn’t come to the New World, no one
in Europe or Asia would ever have had the pleasure of a cup of cocoa.
6. faux pas (fo
-PAH). (from the French for false step) An embarrass-
ing mistake in manners or conduct. I made a terrible faux pas
when I commented to my teacher that she seemed to have gained
weight over the summer.
7. matinee (ma-tuh-NEH). (from the French for morning) An enter-
tainment or performance held in the afternoon. We were so anx-
ious to see that new comedy that we stood in line for the Saturday
matinee.
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note Merge all Excel sheets to one PDF file in VB Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
adding hyperlinks to pdf documents; add links to pdf acrobat
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
pdf link open in new window; add link to pdf file
words we’ve adopted
187
8. objet d’art(ahb-zjay-DART). (from the French for object of art) A
work of art, usually small; sometimes simply called objet or
(plural) objets. My aunt owns a gift shop that specializes in antique
French objets d’art.
9. pirouette (peer-uh-WET). (from the French for spinning top) In
ballet, a complete turn of the body on the point of the toe or the
ball of the foot. The ballerina amazed the audience with her ability to
do multiple pirouettes in rapid succession.
10. pizza(from the Italian for bite). An open-faced baked pie topped
usually with spiced tomato sauce, cheese, and other garnishes.
Pizza is thought by many to have originated in the United States, but
others point out that an early form of pizza was eaten by the ancient
Greeks, who flavored their flat breads with herbs and onions as early
as 500 
B
.
C
.
11. potpourri (po
-puh-REE). (from the French for rotten pot) A mix-
ture of dried flower petals and spices, kept in a jar for their fra-
grance; also, any mixture of assorted objects. Jasmine always
keeps a vase of potpourri scented with jasmine in her room; for obvi-
ous reasons, jasmine is her favorite flower.
12. pro bono publico (pro
bo
noh POOH-ble
- koh). (from the Latin for
the public good) Something done for the public good without
payment; often shortened to pro bono. Many lawyers contribute
their services pro bono to help those who are unable to pay.
PRACTICE 1: MATCHING THE FOREIGN-BORN WORD WITH ITS
ENGLISH MEANING
Draw lines to match each foreign-born word with its English meaning.
Foreign-Born Word
English Meaning
1.pirouette
a. mixture of dried flowers and spices
2.ad hoc
b.argument attacking a person, not a position
3.faux pas
c. reminder to buyers to be careful
4.matinee
d.ballet step turning on one foot
5.potpourri
e. work done for free
6.ad hominem
f. created on the spot, improvised
7.objet d’art
g. embarrassing use of bad manners
8.caveat emptor
h.a favorite food the world over
9.pro bono
i. afternoon performance
10.pizza
j. small object of artistic value
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Signatures. Ability to get word count of PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark
clickable links in pdf; add link to pdf
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
signature; Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit. Support outline; More about PDF Hyperlink Edit ▶. PDF Metadata Edit. Support
add hyperlinks pdf file; clickable links in pdf files
188
build word power in special ways
PRACTICE 2: FOREIGN-BORN WORDS CROSSWORD PUZZLE
Across
Down
2afternoon performance
1designed to deceive
3whirling dance move
3fragrant mixture from nature
4a bad manners mistake
5created on the spot
Word Bank
1
2
3
4
5
ad hoc
camouflage
faux pas
matinee
pirouette
potpourri
words we’ve adopted
189
Lesson 26 Words You Should Now Know
Extra Word(s) You Learned in this Lesson
_______________________________________
_______________________________________
_______________________________________
_______________________________________
ANSWERS
Practice 1: Matching the Foreign-Born Word with Its 
English Meaning
1. d
2. f
3. g
4. i
5. a
6. b
7. j
8. c
9. e
10. h
Practice 2: Foreign-Born Words Crossword Puzzle
Across
Down
2matinee
1camouflage
3pirouette
3potpourri
4faux pas
5ad hoc
ad hoc
ad hominem
camouflage
caveat emptor
cocoa
faux pas
linguist
matinee
objet d’art
pirouette
pizza
potpourri
pro bono publico
AS YOU LEARNED
in Lesson 21, a euphemism is a substitution of a mild,
indirect, or vague expression for one that might be thought offensive, harsh,
or too blunt. This might suggest that speakers and writers use euphemisms
merely to display good manners, but euphemisms are used for other reasons,
not all of which are honest attempts to be more polite or avoid offending
anyone.
Euphemisms are often used
• to avoid speaking directly about something one fears,
• to avoid speaking the truth; using double talk to hide one’s real
meaning,
• to avoid naming a person or thing, using a synonym in order to
appear innocent of slander,
L
E
S
S
O
N
27
words that really 
mean something else
The great enemy of clear language is insincerity. When there is a
gap between one’s real and one’s declared aims, one turns 
as it were instinctively to long words and exhausted 
idioms, like a cuttlefish squirting out ink.
G
EORGE
O
RWELL
(1903–1950)
B
RITISHESSAYISTAND NOVELIST
This lesson focuses on euphemisms, words that we use to avoid using other
words.
192
build word power in special ways
• to avoid naming something considered taboo (unacceptable, for-
bidden in polite society),
• to avoid repeating the same name or idea, as a name-calling
device in political or social issue debates,
• to avoid revealing a secret or allowing others to overhear a name
(frequently used in spy novels and movies),
• to avoid too much seriousness and make light of a difficult 
situation.
HOW WILL EUPHEMISMS BUILD YOUR WORD POWER?
As you know, the best way to increase your vocabulary is to read—this book
and anything and everything else! Additionally, listen carefully to everything
you hear—on the radio and TV, in conversations with friends, parents, and
teachers. You’ll pick up lots of new words to help increase your vocabulary.
You’ll soon be acquiring new words unconsciously, without using flash cards
or study lists or even thinking about it!
Listening for euphemisms also increases your vocabulary and your sen-
sitivity to word meanings. As you notice euphemisms, you’ll automatically
sense the variations and nuances (small differences in meaning) in language
that euphemisms employ. For example, if someone says they live in a working
class neighborhood, you may guess that they don’t live in the wealthiest, fanci-
est part of town. When someone says a neighborhood is in transition, what do
you think they mean? What reality does the euphemism cover?
TIP: How do you know if a word or phrase is a euphemism or simply a
synonym? Ask yourself what the motive was for choosing the word or
words. Why this particular word? Does it hide some secret motive? If
the answer is yes, then it’s probably a euphemism.
Euphemisms aren’t usually made up of difficult words, but are usually a sign
that a sensitive or complicated idea is being simplified or covered up. The fol-
lowing is a list of some common euphemisms. As you read the list, write
down other euphemisms you’ve heard.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested