view pdf winform c# : Add a link to a pdf in preview SDK software API wpf windows asp.net sharepoint Word%20Power21-part1351

confused and abused words
203
PRACTICE 1: USING CONFUSING WORDS CORRECTLY
Circle the correct word in each sentence.
1. Janet gave me a (compliment/complement) about my essay.
2. The class (all together/altogether) has seven iPods, five cell phones, and
two iPhones.
3. Paul is always anxious to (adapt/adopt) every new technology as soon
as it appears on the market.
4. The (continual/continuous) appearance of new cable channels makes TV
watching both exciting and confusing.
5. (Everyone/Every one) of my favorite shows is on a different channel, so
I’m constantly fingering the remote.
PRACTICE 2: REMEMBERING NOT TO ABUSE WORDS
Circle the correct word in each sentence.
1. The candidate and his staff counted (hopeful/hopefully) on volunteers to
help get out the votes.
2. The Ironman triathlon race is (real, really) hard on the runners’
endurance.
3. Lance Armstrong is a (real/really) hero to all bikers.
4. All athletes are (suppose/supposed) to train energetically, but some fail
to do so.
5. Regardless of what the others suggest, do (as/like) I do, and you’ll
succeed.
Add a link to a pdf in preview - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink to pdf acrobat; add hyperlink pdf file
Add a link to a pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf link to email; add link to pdf acrobat
204
build word pow er in special ways
Lesson 28 Words You Should Now Know
Extra Word(s) You Learned in This Lesson
_______________________________________
_______________________________________
_______________________________________
_______________________________________
ANSWERS
Practice 1: Using Confusing Words Correctly
1. compliment
2. all together
3. adopt
4. continual
5. Every one
Practice 2: Remembering Not to Abuse Words
1. hopefully
2. really
3. real
4. supposed
5. as
all together
altogether
as
complement
compliment
continual
continuous
everyone
every one
hopeful
hopefully
like
maybe
may be
regardless
suppose
supposed
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview component enables compressing and
add hyperlinks to pdf online; add links to pdf online
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo
add page number to pdf hyperlink; accessible links in pdf
AS  YOU’VE  BECOME
aware while reading this book, every profession and
subject has words that are unique to it. You now know that philologists study
languages, and etymology is the study of the how words developed over time.
There’s even a special name for the study of spelling—it’s called orthography—
and onomatologists study names. So it should come as no surprise that words
themselves are a subject area.
The combined learning of all these specialized fields, along with the
study of literature and poetry, has resulted in a long list of words about
words. You’ll learn some of them here, and you’ll probably be surprised by
how precisely they describe other words and how words are used. You’ll
also notice that many describe the ways in which you yourself speak and
write.
L
E
S
S
O
N
29
words about words
The finest words in the world are only vain 
sounds if you cannot understand them.
A
NATOLE
F
RANCE
(1844–1924)
F
RENCH AUTHOR AND NOVELIST
In this lesson, you’ll focus on some interesting words about words. There are
many, and they can help you become more precise, and more powerful, as a
speaker and writer.
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe provide users the most individualized PDF page image inserting function, allowing developers to add and insert
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; add a link to a pdf in preview
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
active links in pdf; clickable links in pdf from word
206
build word pow er in special ways
TIP: Check your own speech and writing for some of the words in this
lesson. For example, do you use superfluous words, clichés, circumlo-
cutions, or non sequiturs?
WORDS ABOUT WORDS
1. ambiguous. A  vague,  unclear,  or  indefinite  word, expression,
sentence,  or  meaning.  Our  teacher’s  instructions  about  how  to
write our essays were quite ambiguous, which confused us all.
2. analogy. A comparison between two things that suggests that
they show a similarity in at least some aspects.  Many people
draw an analogy between how our brains work and how computers
function.
3. circumlocution. A roundabout or indirect way of speaking; the
use of more words than necessary to express an idea. My grand-
father was famous in the family for his long-winded circumlocutions
about what life was like when he was a boy.
4. cliché. A trite, overused expression or idea that has lost its origi-
nality  and  impact.  Our  school  nurse  was  forever  repeating  her
favorite timeworn cliché, An apple a day keeps the doctor away.
5. epigram/epigraph. An epigram is a short, witty poem, saying, or
quotation that conveys a single thought in a clever way. An epi-
graph is a brief quotation that appears at the beginning of an
article, essay, or novel to introduce the theme. Every lesson in
this book has been introduced with an epigram used as an epigraph.
6. non sequitur. A statement or conclusion that doesn’t follow logi-
cally from what preceded it. John’s suggestion that we all protest
the requirement of school uniforms was a non sequitur after the prin-
cipal’s announcement that our summer vacation was going to be cut
short.
7. nuance. A slight degree of difference  in  meaning,  feeling,  or
tone of something spoken or written. The poet’s varied description
of the joys of spring included subtle nuances that made us think of the
changing seasons in an entirely new light.
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Able to add a single text character and text string to PDF files using online source codes in C#.NET Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe
add links to pdf document; clickable pdf links
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Independent component for splitting PDF document in preview without using external PDF VB.NET PDF Splitting & Disassembling DLLs. Add necessary references:
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; add link to pdf
words about words
207
8. redundant. Speaking or writing that repeats the same idea sev-
eral times. In order to meet the requirement of 300 words, Jane filled
her essay with many redundant sentences that added no new ideas to
her topic.
9. rhetorical question. A question asked with no expectation of a
reply. The teacher asked us, rhetorically, if we thought we should have
more homework.
10. simile. A statement using the words like or as to compare two
dissimilar things. The valentine he sent me said Your face is like a
rose. Similes are often confused with metaphors, which com-
pare without using the words like and as. For example, a valen-
tine might say, You are my special rose.
11. superfluous.  Something  that’s  unnecessary,  or  more  than
enough or required. Reminding us to do our best on the final test is
a superfluous bit of advice from our teacher.
12. verbiage. An overabundance of words in writing or speech. The
doctor’s verbiage confused me, but my mother was able to figure out
what he meant.
PRACTICE 1: MATCH WORDS ABOUT WORDS WITH 
THEIR MEANING
Draw lines to match each word about words with its meaning.
Word about Words
Meaning
1.circumlocution
a. a trite, overused expression
2.ambiguous
b. a comparison between two things that are 
3.non sequitur
mostly dissimilar
4.nuance
c. a short, witty statement that conveys an idea in a 
5.analogy
clever way
6.simile
d. roundabout way of speaking
7.cliché
e. unnecessary or more than sufficient
8.epigram
f. using more words than necessary, repetitious
9.superfluous
g. a slight shading of meaning
10.redundant
h. a vague or unclear word or statement
i. a comparison using the word like or as
j. a statement that does not follow logically
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Advanced component for splitting PDF document in preview without any third-party plug-ins installed. C# DLLs: Split PDF Document. Add necessary references:
add links to pdf; add links pdf document
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Preview PDF documents without other plug-ins. this PDF document metadata adding control, you can add some additional information to generated PDF file
add url to pdf; adding hyperlinks to pdf documents
208
build word pow er in special ways
PRACTICE 2: WORDS ABOUT WORDS CROSSWORD PUZZLE
Across
Down
1comparison between two things  1 vague, unclear
or ideas
2roundabout, indirect way of speaking
2trite, overused expression
4short, clever saying
3comparison using like or as
5repetitious (in speaking or writing)
6unnecessary, more than required
Word Bank
1
2
3
4
5
6
ambiguous
analogy
circumlocution
cliché
epigram
redundant
simile
superfluous
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Add text to certain position of PDF page in Visual Basic .NET class. Add text to PDF in preview without adobe reader component installed.
add hyperlinks pdf file; add url pdf
words about words
209
Lesson 29 Words You Should Now Know
Extra Word(s) You Learned in this Lesson
_______________________________________
_______________________________________
_______________________________________
_______________________________________
ANSWERS
Practice 1: Matching Words about Words with their Meaning
1. d
2. h
3. j
4. g
5. b
6. i
7. a
8. c
9. e
10. f
Practice 2: Words about Words Crossword Puzzle
Across
Down
1analogy
1ambiguous
2cliché
2circumlocution
3simile
4epigram
6superfluous
5redundant
ambiguous
analogy
circumlocution
cliché
epigram
epigraph
non sequitur
onomatologist
orthography
redundant
rhetorical question
simile
superfluous
verbiage
CONGRATULATIONS ON REACHING
the last lesson in the book! If you’ve
read carefully, done the practice exercises, and remembered to use your new
words in your everyday life, you’ve done a wonderful job of acquiring hun-
dreds of new words.
By now, you’ve also gained an appreciation of how powerful words can
be. They help you communicate ideas, thoughts, feelings, and opinions; they
help you persuade, and they help you amuse. Words can also help you gain
higher  grades;  compliments  from  teachers,  parents,  and  friends;  and  an
increased sense of confidence in your reading, writing, and speaking.
In this last lesson, you will find a list of words that are particularly pow-
erful.  They’re  noteworthy  for their  efficiency:  they  condense  complicated
thoughts into single words. Use these words when you want to avoid the cir-
cumlocutions and redundancies—those bad speaking and writing habits you
learned about in the previous lesson. All the words in this lesson are adjec-
tives, the most versatile part of speech. You might want to look back at Lesson
11 to review some other powerful adjectives you‘ve learned. As you learn
L
E
S
S
O
N
30
words with extra power
Be simple in words, manners, and gestures. Amuse as well 
as instruct. If you can make a man laugh, you can make 
him think and make him like and believe you.
A
LFRED
. E. S
MITH
, J
R
. (1873–1944)
N
EW
Y
ORK GOVERNOR ANDCANDIDATE FOR
U.S. 
PRESIDENT
In this lesson, you’ll learn some words that carry extra punch. They deliver a
lot of meaning and power all by themselves.
212
build word pow er in special ways
these new adjectives, stop to think about how many additional words it might
take to convey the meaning of just one well-chosen adjective.
TIP: Words with extra power convey complicated meanings in a small
space, an ideal goal for anyone seeking true vocabulary breadth and
power.
WORDS WITH EXTRA POWER
1. cacophonous. Describes loud, confusing, and disagreeable sound
or noise. My parents consider my favorite hip hop music nothing but
cacophonous noise.
2. demure. Modest, reserved, and even shy. Cinderella is a classic
example of a demure young woman.
3. esoteric. Understood by or meant for only the special few who
have private or secret knowledge. The study of prehistoric fish is
quite an esoteric field, but one that is truly fascinating.
4. feminist.  Refers  to  the  philosophy  or  political  doctrine  that
holds  that  social,  political,  and  all  other  rights  of  women
should be equal to those of men. The feminist movement has con-
tinued its struggle over the past 150 years to gain equal rights for
women.
5. glib. Said of speaking or writing that is fluent and smooth, but
is also superficial and shows little preparation or sincere con-
cern. The candidate’s glib responses to all the reporter’s questions
made me suspicious about her real qualifications for office.
6. ironic. Seeking to communicate a meaning that is actually the
opposite of its literal meaning; a contradiction between what is
said and what is meant. The story’s title, A Happy Ending, was
clearly ironic since almost  all  the characters were disappointed or
dead by the end.
7. obsequious. Acting submissive and flattering to someone per-
ceived to be more powerful. In my math class, there is one obse-
quious boy who is always trying to win favor with the teacher; he
figures he can do less work if he becomes the teacher’s pet.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested