view pdf winform c# : Adding links to pdf Library control class asp.net web page azure ajax Word%20Power23-part1353

posttest
223
ANSWERS
1. c (Lesson 1)
2. d (Lesson 1)
3. a (Lesson 2)
4. c (Lesson 2)
5. c (Lesson 4)
6. a (Lesson 4)
7. b (Lesson 6)
8. c (Lesson 6)
9. a (Lesson 6)
10. c (Lesson 8)
11. b (Lesson 8)
12. d (Lesson 8)
13. c (Lesson 10)
14. a (Lesson 10)
15. b (Lesson 10)
16. c (Lesson 12)
17. d (Lesson 12)
18. a (Lesson 12)
19. b (Lesson 12)
20. a (Lesson 14)
21. d (Lesson 15)
22. d (Lesson 15)
23. b (Lesson 20)
24. a (Lesson 21)
25. c (Lesson 21)
26. d (Lesson 25)
27. c (Lesson 24)
28. c (Lesson 24)
29. c (Lesson 30)
30. d (Lesson 30)
Adding links to pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks; clickable links in pdf
Adding links to pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add links to pdf in acrobat; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Besides, using this PDF document metadata adding control, you can
add hyperlink to pdf in preview; adding links to pdf document
VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
detail guides on these functions through left menu links. guide on C#.NET PPT image adding library. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add url pdf; adding links to pdf
THE  TERM
standardized test has the ability to produce fear  in test takers.
These tests are often given by a state board of education or a nationally recog-
nized education group. Usually these tests are taken in the hope of getting
accepted—whether it’s for a special program, the next grade in school, or
even to a college or university. Here’s the good news: standardized tests are
more familiar to you than you know. In most cases, these tests look very simi-
lar to tests that your teachers may have given in the classroom. 
The following pages include valuable tips for combating test anxiety—
that  sinking  or  blank  feeling  some  people  feel  as  they  begin  a  test  or
encounter a difficult question. You’ll discover how to use your time wisely
and how to avoid errors when you’re taking a test. Also, you will find a plan
for preparing for the test and for the test day. Once you have these tips down,
you’re ready to approach any exam head-on!
hints for taking standardized tests
View Images & Documents in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
document or image file, like Word, PDF or TIFF other mature image viewing features, like adding or deleting page And you can find the links to these professional
add hyperlink pdf; add hyperlink in pdf
226
hints for taking standardiz ed tests
COMBATING TEST ANXIETY
Take the Test One Question at a Time
Focus all  your attention on the question  you’re  answering. Block out any
thoughts about questions you’ve already read or concerns about what’s com-
ing next. Concentrate your thinking where it will do the most good—on the
present question.
If You Lose Your Concentration
Don’t worry about it! It’s normal. During a long test, it happens to everyone.
When your mind is stressed, it takes a break whether you want it to or not. It’s
easy to get your concentration back if you simply acknowledge the fact that
you’ve lost it and take a quick break.
If You Freeze Before or During the Test
Don’t worry about a question that stumps you. Mark it and go on to the next
question. You can come back to the “stumper” later. Try to put it out of your
mind completely until you come back to it. Chances are, the memory block
will be gone by the time you return to the question. 
If you freeze before you even begin the test, here’s what to do:
1. Take a little time to look over the test.
2. Read a few of the questions.
3. Decide which are the easiest and start there.
4. Before long, you’ll be “in the groove.”
TIME STRATEGIES
With the strategies in this section, you’ll notice the next timed test you take is
not as scary.
hints for taking standardized tests
227
Pace Yourself
The most important time strategy is pacing yourself. Before you begin, take
just a few seconds to survey the test, noting the number of questions and the
sections that look easier than the rest. Estimate a time schedule based upon
the amount of time available to you. Mark the halfway point on your test and
make a note beside that mark of what the time will be when the testing period
is half over. 
Keep Moving
Once you begin the test, keep moving. If you work slowly in an attempt to
make fewer mistakes, your mind will become bored and begin to wander, and
you will lose concentration. 
The Process of Elimination
For some standardized tests, there is no guessing penalty. What this means is
that you shouldn’t be afraid to guess. For a multiple-choice question with four
answer choices, you have a one in four chance of guessing correctly. And your
chances improve if you can eliminate a choice or two. 
By using the process of elimination, you will cross out incorrect answer
choices and improve your odds of finding the correct answer. In order for the
process of elimination to work, you must keep track of what choices you are
crossing out. Cross out incorrect choices on the test booklet itself. If you don’t
cross out an  incorrect answer, you may still think it is a  possible  answer.
Crossing  out  any  incorrect  answers  makes  it  easier  to  identify  the  right
answer: There will be fewer places where it can hide!
AVOIDING ERRORS
When you take a test, you want to make as few errors as possible in the ques-
tions you answer. Following are a few tactics to keep in mind. 
228
hints for taking standardiz ed tests
Control Yourself
If you feel rushed or worried, stop for a few seconds. Acknowledging the feel-
ing (Hmmm! I’m feeling a little pressure here!), take a few deep breaths, and send
yourself a few positive messages (I am prepared for this test, and I will do well!).
Directions
In many standardized testing situations, specific instructions are given and you
must follow them as best as you can. Be sure you understand what is expected.
If you don’t, ask. Listen carefully for instructions about how to answer the ques-
tions and make certain you know how much time you have to complete the
task. If you miss any important information about the rules of taking the test,
ask for it. 
If You Finish Early
Use any time you have left at the end of the test or test section to check your
work. First, make sure you’ve put the right answers in the right places. After
you’ve checked for errors, take a second look at the more difficult questions. If
you have a good reason for thinking your first response was wrong, change it. 
THE DAYS BEFORE THE TEST
Physical Activity
Get some exercise in the days preceding the test. Play a game outside with
your friends or take your pet for a walk. Exercise helps give more oxygen to
your brain and allows your thinking performance to rise on the day you take
the test. But moderation is key here. You don’t want to exercise so much that
you feel too tired; however, a little physical activity will do the trick. 
hints for taking standardized tests
229
Balanced Diet
Like your body, your brain needs the proper nutrients to function well. Eat
plenty of fruits and vegetables in the days before the test. Foods like fish and
beans are also good choices to help your mind reach its best level of perfor-
mance before a big test.
Rest
Get plenty of sleep the nights before the test. Go to bed at a reasonable time,
and you’ll feel relaxed and rested.
TEST DAY
It’s finally here: the day of the big test! Eat a good breakfast, and avoid any-
thing high in sugar (even though it might taste good, no sugary cereal or
doughnuts). If you can, get to your classroom early so you can review your
materials before the test begins. The best thing to do next is to relax and think
positively! Before you know it, the test will be over, and you’ll walk away
knowing you did your absolute best!
accept recognize or take on something
acronym
pronounceable word formed from the initial letters or syllables of
a series of words
acrophobia fear of heights
adapt to adjust or modify something
ad hoc (from Latin for for this) created right now, or improvised, for a spe-
cific purpose
ad hominem
(from Latin for to the man) argument that attacks someone’s
character rather than facts by appealing to the emotions rather than the intellect
adjacent bordering on, being next to, or close, or neighboring
adopt to accept as one’s own
advocate a person who argues on behalf of an idea or another person
aerobic something or someone that utilizes oxygen in order to live
G
L
O
S
S
A
R
Y
232
glossary
affect to modify or change something
agoraphobia an abnormal fear of open spaces, crowds, and public areas
agrarian relating to the cultivation of the land or farming
all ready the state of being prepared for something
all together a group of things or persons gathered together
all ways every method or path available
allocate to set aside for a specific purpose
already by this time
altogether entirely, completely
altruistic unselfishly interested in the welfare of others
always forever, as in time
ambiguous unclear, unspecific, open to interpretation
amiable friendly, good-natured, comfortable with others
amnesia in extreme cases, the total loss of memory
amnesty the granting of a pardon, or immunity for an offense, by a head of
state
anachronism
something that is out of order chronologically or belongs to
another time
analogy a comparison between two things that suggests that they are simi-
lar in at least some aspects
analogous similar in at least some aspects
ancestor a person from whom one is descended, especially if more remote
than a grandparent
anime (from the Japanese word for animation) animation done in the Japan-
ese style
antecedent something that comes before something else, preceding another
anthropology the study of the origins, customs, beliefs, and social relation-
ships of groups of human beings
antonym
a word that has the opposite meaning of another word
apathetic lazy, uninterested, indifferent
arachnophobia an extreme fear of spiders
arbiter a person appointed to settle differences between two individuals or
groups
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested