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use a word’s context to figure out its meaning
33
Extra Word(s) You Learned in This Lesson
_______________________________________
_______________________________________
_______________________________________
_______________________________________
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THE PREVIOUS LESSON
focused on strategies for finding the meaning of
words  by looking closely at their context, or surroundings. In this lesson,
you’ll learn to identify subtle differences in the meanings of words that may
seem quite similar at first.
At first glance, many words seem to convey the same thought, but upon
closer inspection, you’ll discover that this is not always the case. Words can
mean very different things. We describe a word’s meaning by using these two
categories:
Denotation: the literal, dictionary definition of a word.
Connotation: the suggested, emotional, cultural, or implied meaning of
a word.
L
E
S
S
O
N
4
create meaning from connotations
No one means all he says, and yet very few say all they mean, 
for words are slippery and thought is viscous.
—H
ENRY
B
ROOKS
A
DAMS
(1838–1918)
A
MERICANNOVELIST AND HISTORIAN
This lesson will help you become more aware of how one word can convey sev-
eral meanings. Becoming sensitive to the implied meaning of new vocabulary
words will help you build your word power.
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36
tool s for  building word pow er
Think about two simple words we all know and often use: home and house.
Dictionary definitions of these words are quite similar:
house (noun): a structure serving as an abode for human beings.
home(noun): one’s own dwelling place; the house or structure in which
one lives; especially the house in which one lives with one’s family; the
habitual abode of one’s family.
But, do the two words always mean the same thing? Look at the following
sentences and consider the different uses of the word home.
Israel is the ancestral home of many of the world’s religions.
Pedro is an American citizen, but he considers Mexico his home.
The way home for the runaway is often long and lonely.
In each sentence, the word home means something different, something more
subtle and complicated than the denotative meaning of a dwelling or a structure.
In the second sentence, Pedro’s emotional attachment to Mexico is great enough
for him to think of it as home, a place of warmth, love, family, and happiness,
even though he has an actual dwelling or abode somewhere in the United States.
In general, words have connotations that are positive or negative; some-
times a connotation is neutral, but this is less likely. Most often, words derive
their connotations from the context in which they appear, or the way people
use them. It’s rare to use words only in their denotative, dictionary meaning,
and because words can carry complicated meanings, it’s important for you to
be sensitive to their possible connotations. The more connotations you know,
the stronger your word power will be.
PRACTICE 1: IDENTIFYING COMMON WORD CONNOTATIONS
Read the following sets of words, and then write each word in the appropriate
column according to the connotation, or association, it has for you and your
friends.
1. thin, plump, fat, slim
2. chatty, quiet, talkative, moody
3. snooty, friendly, vain, proud
4. shack, residence, apartment, condo
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create meaning from connotations
37
Positive Connotations
Negative Connotations
Neutral Connotations
How many words did you write in the neutral column? Did you hesitate about
certain words? Is it fair to conclude that most words you use have a connota-
tive meaning at least slightly different from their denotative meanings?
SAYING EXACTLY WHAT YOU MEAN
Whenever you speak or write, be aware of any connotations of the words you
use. As you know, the words you choose convey your meaning; that’s what
language does. But not only words have connotations; whole sentences do.
Spoken or written language that includes carefully chosen connotative words
to convey emotions or subtle suggestions make sentences more interesting
and help listeners or readers get a clearer understanding of what you’re really
trying to say. The more precise your words, the more power they will have,
and the better your overall communication will be.
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38
tool s for  building word pow er
PRACTICE 2: CREATING MEANING THROUGH CONNOTATION
For each sentence below, identify the change in meaning created by the substi-
tution or addition of a new word or words to describe the underlined word or
words in the sentence. If you don’t know a word, look it up in the dictionary.
The example has been done to give you a sample to follow.
Example
The candidate
raised his arms above his head
as the crowd applauded
loudly
.
The victorious candidate raised his arms heroically as the crowd
applauded uproariously.
Denotation of the sentence:A candidate won and the crowd applauded.
Connotation of new sentence: An extremely popular candidate won
and felt proud of his victory. This sentence is much richer in
connotation; it communicates meaning more effectively.
Now, describe the differences between sentences by telling denotative and
new connotative meanings. You may  want to  include a description of  the
writer’s attitude toward the subject in each case.
1. After
Hurricane Katrina, the city ran out of
first aid supplies.
In the tragic wake of Hurricane Katrina, the city’s first aid supplies were found
to be inadequate and drastically lacking.
Denotation:_________________________________________________________
New Connotation:___________________________________________________
2. The reviews of the movie The Wizard of Oz varied
, but the audiences liked
the movie.
The movie reviewers were ambiguous in their comments about The Wizard of
Oz, but the audiences loved the movie unanimously.
Denotation:_________________________________________________________
New Connotation:___________________________________________________
create meaning from connotations
39
3. Speaking
after a coughing fit is hard
.
Speaking coherently after a coughing fit is often more than a cold sufferer can
manage.
Denotation:_________________________________________________________
New Connotation:___________________________________________________
4. Cutting school can affect
your future.
The consequences of repeatedly cutting school can have negative repercus-
sions throughout your life.
Denotation:_________________________________________________________
New Connotation:___________________________________________________
5. The newspaper reporter was accused of favoring
one candidate over the
other.
The newspaper reporter was said to be guilty of distorting the facts in order to
damage one candidate’s reputation.
Denotation:_________________________________________________________
New Connotation:___________________________________________________
Can you make a generalization about the difference between each of the first
and  second  sentences?  Do  you  see  that  the  second  sentences  have  more
words, more specific words, and more complicated thoughts than the first
sentences? As you’ve no doubt figured out, these are the characteristics of sen-
tences with word power.
40
tool s for  building word pow er
Lesson 4 Words You Should Now Know
ambiguous
distort
coherent
inadequate
connotation
subtle
consequence
unanimous
denotation
uproarious
Extra Word(s) You Learned in This Lesson
_______________________________________
_______________________________________
_______________________________________
_______________________________________
ANSWERS
Practice 2: Creating Meaning through Connotation
1. After
Hurricane Katrina, the city ran out of
first aid supplies.
In the tragic wake of Hurricane Katrina, the city’s first aid supplies were
found to be inadequate and drastically lacking.
Denotation: Factual report of lack of supplies.
New Connotation: Sentence blames the city for running out of supplies
by using emotional words like tragic, inadequate, and drastically.
2. The reviews of the movie The Wizard of Oz varied
, but the audiences liked
the movie.
The movie reviewers were ambiguous in their comments about The Wiz-
ard of Oz, but the audiences loved the movie unanimously.
Denotation: Interesting but unexplained report that reviews of movie
varied.
New Connotation: Sentence explains how popular movie was with audi-
ences even though reviewers weren’t clear about what they thought.
create meaning from connotations
41
3. Speaking
after a coughing fit is hard
.
Speaking coherently after a coughing fit is often more than a cold sufferer
can manage.
Denotation: Sentence states a fact, but that’s all. No new information is
provided.
New Connotation: Sentence communicates what it is like to have a bad
cold and cough.
4. Cutting school can affect
your future.
The consequences of cutting school repeatedly can have negative reper-
cussions throughout your life.
Denotation: Sentence makes an unclear statement what the effect of cut-
ting school will be.
New Connotation: Sentence is somewhat clearer by saying effect is nega-
tive for a long time.
5. The newspaper reporter was accused of favoring
one candidate over the
other.
The newspaper reporter was said to be guilty of distorting the facts in
order to damage one candidate’s reputation.
Denotation: Sentence is vague and doesn’t explain how the reporter
favored the candidate.
New Connotation: Sentence more clearly says what the reporter did that
was wrong and why he did it.
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