Word, Sign, Culture, Self: Notes on Linguistic and Semiotic 
Anthropology 
Ivan Kalmar
Chapters: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9
2000 by Ivan Kalmar 
Click on one of the chapter numbers to get 
to the chapter you want. You may have to 
scroll up or down a bit once you get there.
Pdf reader link - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding links to pdf in preview; adding hyperlinks to pdf documents
Pdf reader link - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
check links in pdf; adding hyperlinks to pdf
Preface 
This booklet is a revision of Anthropological Linguistics and Semiotics, which 
saw two Quirk editions, the last one published in 1997.  Knowledge is expanding rapidly 
in its twin fields, and it is necessary now to do more than just adjust a word here, a 
sentence there.  Since the last edition anthropologists and others have continued to make 
progress along the road to understanding language and other systems of communication 
not only as reflective of culture and society, but as constitutive of them.  We know more 
about how communication systems do much more than communicate: they are an 
essential ingredient with which culture and society are made.  Some of this progress can 
now be incorporated into a course at the introductory level. 
The booklet is meant to support a series of lectures on its various topics.  It is a 
springboard for the lecturer and the student to explore some ideas.  It is not meant to be 
used as reading material independently of the lectures. 
The division of the text is essentially into three parts.  The first is an introduction, 
the second a look into the fundamentals of linguistic structure, and the third an 
examination of the way cultures and societies are constituted in part by using not only 
language but also other meaning-making tools (the non-verbal codes employed in a range 
of activities of which a few that we mention are advertising, wine-tasting, public events).  
The distinction is not maintained rigorously.  On the contrary, I have attempted to show 
how even the most minute matters of linguistic structure relate to language as a means of 
creating and perpetuating aspects of culture and society.  
My hope is that the book, if used appropriately, will lead students to explore 
further into the fascinating worlds of linguistic and semiotic anthropology.  Just as 
importantly, it should compel them to find a new perspective on what might mistakenly 
appear as "ordinary" aspects of their everyday lives as homo sapiens, maker of signs. 
Toronto, July 6, 2000 
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.OCR. Microsoft Office. XDoc.Word. XDoc.Excel. XDoc.PowerPoint. Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator.
add links pdf document; add hyperlink pdf document
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
pdf links; add link to pdf acrobat
Basic Concepts:  Language and Sign 
1.1.
Language 
Linguists and anthropologists study language ultimately as a universal 
phenomenon - the "language faculty."  They are interested in particular languages 
such as English, Vietnamese, or Swahili as products of that universal "faculty." 
There are many universal features in language.  For example, all language appear 
to have nouns and verbs. 
This may be because we are programmed as humans to easily process only certain 
kind of language rules.  For example, it is difficult for us to make negatives by 
reversing the word order in a sentence.  This would mean that the negative of the 
sentence 
Real Finns hate electric saunas 
would be 
Saunas electric hate Finns real 
Try to reverse the word order of any of the sentences in this book or any other 
sentence you can think of, in order to follow this imaginary "negative rule."  You 
will see that this is very difficult.  It is difficult because our minds have not been 
"programmed" to process such rules easily.  In contrast, it is very easy for us to 
learn to place a verb after a noun. 
If you had to learn to reverse the typical noun-verb order in English, you would be 
saying 
Lost the Leafs yesterday 
instead of 
The Leafs lost yesterday 
You would not have nearly the trouble learning such order reversal that you had 
when you tried to reverse the complete word order of a sentence.  Try it! 
1.1.1.  Do not confuse language with its "channel.". 
Language need not be spoken.   
Deaf-mutes have language, but express it other than vocally. 
Language is the language "faculty;" an innate ability possessed by humans.  It has 
a structure (e.g. "nouns come before words") that is independent of the way we 
express it:  through speech, through writing, or through sign language. 
Speech, writing, and sign language are "channels" for sending language messages 
to others.   
Traditional education privileges writing above other channels.  Linguists and 
anthropologists do not. 
1.1.2.
Do not confuse language with communication. 
A few decades ago the most popular way of looking at language among 
anthropologists and linguists was to think of its main function as communication. 
But language need not be communicated:  internal "speech" exists, too. 
The words we think with segment and categorize a world that might otherwise 
appear to us as pure chaos. 
The internal narratives through which we describe to ourselves what happens 
help us to make sense of our relationships with other humans and the 
environment. 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add a link to a pdf in preview; add hyperlink to pdf in
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
change link in pdf; clickable links in pdf from word
The Greeks understood some of this, as their word logos referred to both reason 
and language.  In Christian theology, following both Greek and Hebrew 
traditions, logos is also the manifestation of God. 
1.1.3.
Internal "speech" reflects the way we speak with others. 
Mikhail Bakhtin argued that internal speech is secondary to dialogue between 
different individuals.   
A baby's first language is dialogue with others, and based on dialogue carried on 
by others.  Monologue happens only after dialogue is internalized. 
In this way, our understanding of the world as aided by internal speech reflects, 
and comes from, a social understanding of the same.   
One meaning of culture is "a shared understanding of the world."   When we 
internalize language we also internalize culture. 
1.2.
Language and other systems of signs 
Language is not the only tool to make and to internalize interpretations of the 
world.  Words, which are justifiably thought of as building blocks of language 
(although we will need to complicate the picture somewhat as we go on), are only 
one kind of sign.  Signs are, simply put, items that stand for other items.  The 
word dog stands for a certain kind of animal.  But so does a picture of a dog, or a 
photograph.  Certain facts are true of words that are not necessarily true of other 
signs, however. 
1.2.1.
Language is arbitrary and conventional (symbolic) 
Natural language is arbitrary.  This means there is no necessary connection 
between the sign and what it stands for. 
dog  chien   
sobaka 
are the English, French, and Russian ways of referring to the same animal.  
Obviously, one is not a more natural way of referring to canines than any other.  
There is no necessary connection between these words and the animal.  The dog 
is called dog or sobaka by convention only. 
Signs that are arbitrary and entirely conventional are called (following the work of 
the semiotician Charles Pierce) symbols.  Most words are symbols, and language 
is therefore for the most part a symbolic system. 
Arguably, the "language" of color does not work in this way.  If a light green 
color comes across as soothing, it is probably not because of some culture-
specific convention, but because of a universal human propensity to react to it in 
this way. 
1.2.2.
Only a small part, if any, of language is iconic 
Signs that do reproduce some aspect of their referent were called iconic by Pierce.  
A picture or a photograph of a dog is iconic, as is a recording of its barking.  So is 
a dog paw depicted on a bag of dog food. 
There are a few words in every language that resemble what they stand for 
through the way they sound.  These iconic words are called onomatopoeia.  
Examples may be 
meouw meouw 
woof-woof 
splash 
bang 
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
create PDF document viewer & reader in ASP.NET web application using C# code. Related C# PDF Imaging Project Tutorials! Please click the following link to see
pdf edit hyperlink; c# read pdf from url
C# Raster - Raster Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
add hyperlink in pdf; add hyperlinks pdf file
Even these may not be as imitative of what they stand for as we, enculturated by 
our language, might think.  In Japanese, the pig does not go oink-oink but buu-
buu. 
Many non-linguistic signs are iconic.  Consider the following: 
            
1.2.3.
Much of language is indexical. 
In addition to arbitrary and iconic signs, Pierce recognized indexical ones (indices 
or indexes).  An index does not reproduce any aspect of what it stands for, yet it 
has an existential relationship with its referent.  For example, smoke is an index of 
fire.  The relationship between smoke and fire is neither arbitrary (totally 
determined by convention) nor iconic (smoke does not look like fire). 
Consider the following words: 
there  this  up 
she  I 
you 
These words are arbitrary in the sense that any other sequence of sounds would do 
(I is moi in French), but they are indexical in the sense that their exact meaning is 
not fixed by convention.  We need to know the spatio-temporal context in order to 
understand what or whom they refer to. 
What is important to linguistics anthropologists is that indexical terms do not 
simply reflect a preexisting reality.  They encode a reality that is constituted as we 
speak.  You become you to me only because I address you.  up becomes up only 
if I find myself under it.  What about I? 
Many non-linguistic signs are indexical.  In addition to the "smoke" example 
above, consider: 
a mole hill   
the flags on Mt. Everest   a gold chain   
3.  We see from the above that language is a system of signs, and not the only one 
at that.  Linguistics, the study of language, is part, in this sense, of semiotics, the 
study of all kinds of signs.  Linguistic anthropology and semiotic anthropology 
are disciplines that study the role of signs in human culture and society, with 
linguistic anthropology focused on the signs of language.  Because the signs of 
language are easier to understand, appear to be better organized, and have been 
studies more extensively than other signs, the study of language provides 
important tools for the study of signs in general.  In the next few chapters we 
therefore turn our attention specifically to the structure of language, that is, of 
linguistic signs. 
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
reading PDF document in ASP.NET web, .NET Windows Forms and mobile developing applications respectively. For more information on them, just click the link and
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; add page number to pdf hyperlink
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
Besides, here is the quick link for how to process Word document within We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf link; clickable links in pdf files
Conversation 
2.1.  Turn taking:  Taking, Holding, and Relinquishing the Floor 
2.1.1. How the addressee tells the speaker that he or she can hold 
the floor 
The back channel 
Responses by the hearer that confirm the speaker‟s holding the floor, such 
as:   
uh huh; yeah; m-hm 
Finishing the speaker‟s sentence 
Gaze 
Addressee gazes more than the speaker. 
Addressee‟s gaze confirms that the speaker is holding the floor. 
Speaker turns gaze at addressee if he or she wants the addressee to speak, either 
on the back channel, or by taking over the floor. 
Filled Pause 
Geoffrey Beattier and Phil Barnard studied calls to Bell‟s telephone directory 
service.  In these telephone conversations, pauses were not longer, and turn taking not 
more difficult, than in face-to-face conversation. 
This was because the lack of opportunity to gaze was made up by the use of the 
“filled pause:” ah, um, er.  (This is different from the back channel in use, though the 
actual expressions used may be the same.  What is the difference?) 
2.1.2. How the speaker signals that the addressee may take the 
floor 
a)
shifts in tone (drawl) 
b)
using a hand movement (wave or gesture) 
c)
interjecting a stock phrase (“you know”) 
d)
dropping pitch or volume of voice 
e)
using grammatical clues, e.g. completing a sentence 
2.1.3. How the addressee attempts to take the floor 
a)
shifts gaze from speaker 
b)
uses interjections: er, umm (How is this different from using the 
same items as back channel or filled pause?) 
c)
interrupts (this is not “rude” if done at certain points of the 
speaker‟s turn, such as a brief pause) 
2.1.4. 
The speaker’s reaction
Speaker “surrenders” 
a)
stops talking and encourages intruder 
b)
stops talking but does not encourage intruder 
c)
keeps talking until finished thought, then stops talking 
Speaker refuses to “surrender” 
a)
raises voice 
b)
repeats the same sentence 
c)
protests explicitly, e.g. “Don‟t interrupt!” 
d)
uses a hand gesture (What gestures could be used?) 
2.1.5. 
The addressee refuses to take the speaker’s refusal to 
“surrender”
In protest against the speaker‟s refusal to surrender the floor, the addressee 
can 
a)
raise pitch / volume of demand 
b)
interrupt at an inappropriate place (e.g. outside a pause) 
c)
displays facial tension 
d)
uses gestures:  clenched fist on the table, etc. 
2.2.  Cultural Differences 
One U.S. study shows that women gaze at each other in conversation 38% of the 
time; men 23%. 
This will not be true everywhere. 
Gazing at a person of the opposite sex WHILE holding the floor may be 
interpreted as serious flirtation in North America and Northwestern Europe; not so 
elsewhere in Europe.  In China, it is considered quite provocative. 
Speakers from different cultures also differ in their conversational strategies.   
In European and European-derived cultures, silence is perceived as a break in 
communication, and is normally to be avoided in the company of all but our closest 
intimates.   
The Inuit do not find traditionally find silence embarrassing.  Guests come 
uninvited at any time.  They may sit silently at the host‟s house even for hours, and then 
leave.  Keeping others out of your space is not a “privacy” right among the Inuit; not 
speaking is. 
2.3.  Gender Differences 
There are differences in the way men and women conduct conversation.  Research 
on this topic is growing both in quality and quantity.  Most conclusions offered by 
researchers are quickly challenged by others.  Here are some examples, none of which are 
to be taken as unquestionably valid. 
2.3.1. Report talk and Rapport talk 
Deborah Tannen maintains that men‟s talk aims primarily to report on 
facts and to seek solutions to problems.  Women‟s talk aims primarily to 
build rapport among the parties to the conversation. 
Part of men‟s conversational goals is to increase their status; women are 
more likely to aim for the establishment of intimacy. 
2.3.2. Do men interrupt more? 
Researchers West and Zimmerman found that in general men interrupt 
more, but in graduate seminars, women interrupt just as much. 
2.3.3. Do women talk more? 
In research by Ann Cutler and Donna Scott, men and women said exactly 
the same things, but “judges” who listened (separately) to the male and 
female speakers thought that the women talked more. 
Cutler and Scott‟s explanations were:  either 1) a higher pitched voice 
seems faster, so it seems to produce more talk within the same length of 
time; and/or 2) people think that any amount of time taken up by a woman 
speaking is a long time. 
It may be, however, that women actually talk more (though this was not 
the case on Cutler and Scott‟s recordings).  If so, why?  (See “Talk versus 
Violence” below.) 
2.4.  High-involvement / High-considerateness speakers 
High-involvement speakers, according to Tannen, produce more language, 
interrupt more aggressively, shift to new topics more readily; feel that making their 
feelings obvious is more important than not hurting others.  
High-considerateness speakers allow their conversation partners more control 
over the floor; feel that not disagreeing with the other speaker is more important than 
making their feelings clear. 
Mutual misunderstanding 
High-involvement speakers consider high-considerateness speakers hypocritical. 
High-considerateness speakers consider high-involvement speakers rude and 
aggressive. 
2.4.  Talk versus violence 
Tannen found that high-involvement speakers were often female.   
According to the philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre, argument is sometimes the 
strength of groups who have had to live with violence against them but were not 
able to counter it with violence, as was historically the case with the Jews. 
Sartre‟s argument may also be made about women. 
Text and syntax 
In looking at conversation, we situated language in interaction between different 
individuals.  In recent years anthropological linguists and other scholars have found this 
to be the best way to advance their understanding of language.  In linguistics proper, 
however (the study of the forms of which the structure of language is formed), language 
is studied primarily not as speech performance – which typically takes place between 
individuals – but as a competence for speaking, which is an attribute of each human 
individual.  According to Noam Chomsky, who coined the terms “competence” and 
“performance,” competence is best studied as that of an idealized speaker living in a 
homogeneous community.  This eliminates any consideration of differences among 
different speakers and different addressees.  However, it may be necessary for getting at 
the basic structures of language.   
Without understanding those structures we cannot adequately understand what 
language is.  We need to know what language is before we attempt to understand how it 
functions as a cultural resource and a cultural product.  Consequently, we need to know 
some “pure” linguistics before we can turn to linguistic anthropology.   
The next chapters include some – including this one – that represent for the most 
part a much simplified introduction to (non-anthropological) linguistics. 
3.1.  Text 
A conversation is a “text.”  Linguists and other scholars use this term to mean a. 
any substantially self-contained piece of language, whether written or not 
(ranging from someone screaming “Fire!” to a long book like the Bible).  Even 
more broadly, some speak of a film or of the architecture of a city as a text.  We 
limit our attention for now to linguistic texts. 
In recent years the study of texts has made great advances.  For introductory 
purposes, we will simplify the discussion to a few pointers about the structure of 
texts. 
There are rules for how strings of words (such as sentences) can be or cannot be 
combined into texts. 
For example, a sentence like the following does not normally appear at the 
beginning of a text: 
In fact, he did so very well. 
Here, he and so refer to a person and an action that must be known to the hearer 
already, probably from previously mentioned sentences. 
Many texts have linguistic units that define a beginning, a middle, and an end. 
Which part of a telephone conversation is being defined by a speaker who says: 
Anyway, ... 
Nice weather, eh? 
Well, what I’m calling about is … 
Formulas 
Formulas are stereotypical constructions that distinguish the parts of a text. 
Beginning 
Hello, how are you? 
Fine, thanks.  You? 
Fine.  Freezing, eh? 
Once upon a time … 
It has been reliably reported that … 
Clouseau hated reality … 
Middle 
Look here, you creep … 
See there was this … 
Meantime, at the Hall of Evil … 
Now that’s not all … 
End 
And they lived happily ever after. 
OK? 
This is Michelle Robinson, Ottawa. 
Oh well … Bye! 
I have spoken. 
3.2 Syntax 
More familiar than the rules for putting together utterances to form texts, are the 
rule for putting together words to make utterances.  For most linguists, the basic kind of 
utterance they study is the sentence.  Syntax is the term they use to describe the study of 
sentence structure – the way words and phrases are combined to make sentences. 
In Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll, there appears to be little “real” meaning.  Yet it 
is possible to discern some sort of meaning in the poem, because of the syntax. 
„Twas brilling, and the slithy toves 
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe 
All mimsy were the borogoves, 
and the mome raths outgrabe. 
The poem sounds recognizably English though it makes little sense.  In part, this 
is because of the few words that do make sense, like “All,” “and,” or “the.”  What helps 
just as much is the features that indicate that English syntax has been faithfully followed.  
In the first line we see that, in slithy toves, a word ending in –y precedes one ending in –
s.  An English speaker will conclude that the first is an adjective and the second a plural 
noun.  The order “adjective then noun” is typical for English.  Can you find other 
examples of English syntax here? 
The linguist Noam Chomsky coined a famous example of a sentence that is 
syntactically correct (obeys the rules of syntax) but makes no sense: 
Colorful ideas sleep furiously 
He called this sentence grammatical (linguists often use “grammar” to mean 
“syntax” – not the same concept as used by most school teachers!) but not acceptable. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested