view pdf winform c# : Chrome pdf from link control application platform web page azure asp.net web browser word%20sign%20culture1-part1366

Compare sentences 1) and 2): 
Banana slipped Sheldon arm broke his. 
Sheldon snarked the flurophile glimbo. 
Sentence 1) is ungrammatical but has sense.  Sentence 2) is, not unlike 
Chomsky‟s, grammatical but unacceptable. 
3.3 
The “Innateness Hypothesis”
Some conceivable types of syntactic rule do not exist in any language.  As we 
have seen (ch. 1), it is logically possible for the negative to be formed by reversing the 
word order of a positive sentence.  But no language takes advantage of this possibility.  
According to Chomsky, the reason why we would find it difficult to use such a rule is 
that we are not genetically predisposed to have rules of that nature. 
Chomsky believes that children do not learn language (a generalized “faculty”), 
though of course they do learn individual languages.   
According to him, we have an innate, genetically determined ability to recognize 
syntactic rules that are humanly possible, and to distinguish them form those that are not.  
As young children, we use this innate ability to recognize the specific language type(s) 
used in our society.   
Every type of language is restricted by our innate ability to learn only certain 
types of rules and not others.  This accounts for the existence of language universals. 
3.4 Syntactic categories; Agreement 
Syntax, that is to say the rules for making strings of words that form sentences, is 
not just a matter of word order.  Language provides an indication of which words 
in the sentence are related, sometimes even independently of their order.  Such 
indication is provided by syntactic categories:  devices to show how parts of 
sentences are related to each other. 
The most important syntactic categories express agreement, e.g. number or 
gender agreement.  Examples follow: 
3.4.1.  Number Agreement 
English 
The kitten-s drive- Sheila crazy. 
The kitten- drive-s Sheila crazy. 
The suffixes –s and - show, in the first sentence, that the noun and the verb 
agree in number (plural).  In the second sentence, - and –s, the suffixes have the same 
form, but their meaning is different.  In this case, they mean “singular.”  - means 
“plural” on a verb but singular on a noun.  –s means “singular” on a verb but plural on the 
noun. 
The following sentence shows how number agreement helps to show which words 
are related: 
Do-es she know and do- they know that the attendant- had previously 
met the officer-s? 
Chrome pdf from link - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf hyperlink; pdf link to email
Chrome pdf from link - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlink to pdf in preview; add links to pdf in acrobat
(The suffix we spell –es here is pronounced the same and means the same as –s).  
Notice how the suffixes in bold identify which form of the verb do is related to which 
noun. 
Japanese 
Syntactic categories do not work the same way in all languages.  Japanese does 
not have number agreement. 
shimizu wa koko ni imasu 
Shimizu wa here ni is/are 
shimizu to tanaka wa koko ni imasu 
Shimizu and Tanaka wa here ni is/are 
Regardless of the number of nouns it agrees with (“Shimizu” or “Shimizu and 
Tanaka) the form of the verb be is always the same (imasu).  In Japanese the verb does 
not need to agree with the noun it “goes with.”   
(wa and ni are Japanese particles that, on the other hand, express things that are 
not necessarily expressed in English.  They are difficult to translate and need not be 
translated here.) 
3.4.2.  Gender Agreement 
Gender agreement is no more universal than number agreement.  French, German, 
Dutch and Zulu have gender agreement.  English does not. 
French 
Cette province est belle. 
This province is beautiful. 
Ce chapeau est beau. 
This hat is beautiful. 
A different form of “this” (cette – feminine, ce – masculine) and of “beautiful” 
(belle and beau, respectively) goes with different gender nouns (province – feminine, 
chapeau – masculine). 
3.4.3  Syntactic (“Grammatical”) Gender has nothing
to do with 
Social/Biological Gender 
Latin 
The terms “masculine” and “feminine” were invented to describe two of the three 
gender classes of Latin.  Latin grammarians noticed that nouns like masculus (“man”) 
had to be used with adjectives like magnus (“great”), while femina (“woman”) had to go 
with magna.  Can you see that “great” in Latin ends in –us or –a depending on the 
“gender” of the noun?   
In the case of masculus and femina, gender is a straitforward matter: the first 
refers to a being that is “really” masculine and the second to one that is “really” feminine.  
This is not the case with most nouns, in Latin or in other languages.  There is nothing 
female about a province (Latin provincia, French province) and nothing male about a 
color (Latin color, French couleur).  Syntactic (“grammatical”) gender has nothing to 
do with social or biological gender.  This is illustrated by the following examples: 
C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
modern browsers, such as IE, Chrome, Firefox, and RasterEdge DocImage SDK for .NET link directly. RasterEdgeImagingDeveloperGuide8.0.pdf: from this user manual
pdf reader link; pdf link to specific page
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
supports multiple common browsers, such as IE, Chrome, Firefox, Safari information on them, just click the link and go VB.NET PDF Web Viewer, VB.NET PDF Windows
accessible links in pdf; add url to pdf
German 
der Mann 
the man 
die Frau 
the woman 
das Mädchen 
the girl 
In German, the article the can have three different genders.  Though Mädchen 
refers to a female being, it takes a “neuter,” not “feminine” article. 
Dutch 
Dutch has only two genders and consequently only two forms of the article the: 
de and het.  (Although traditionalist Dutch grammarians pretend, on the basis of earlier 
forms of the language, that there are three genders.)  “Man” and “woman” are both de, 
while “girl” is het: 
de man 
the man 
de vrouw 
the woman 
het meisje 
the girl 
Zulu 
The Bantu languages of Africa have large numbers of genders, and these have 
nothing to do with maleness or femaleness.  The following are examples of “gender A,” 
“gender B,” and “gender C” in Zulu (spoken in South Africa). 
Gender A (example: amafutha) 
amafutha ami  
my fat 
amafutha akhe 
his/her fat 
Gender B (example: isihlalo) 
isihlalo sami   
my seat 
isihlalo yakhe  
his/her seat 
Gender C (example: uukhezo) 
uukhezo lwami 
my spoon 
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Major browser supported, include chrome, firefox, ie, edge, safari, etc. Embed converted html files in html page or iframe. Export PDF form data to html form in
pdf email link; active links in pdf
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Use JS (jquery) to control PDF page navigation. Cross browser supported, like chrome, firefox, ie, edge, safari. Embed zoom setting (fit page, fit width).
add hyperlink to pdf acrobat; add link to pdf
uukhezo lwakhe 
his/her spoon 
You should be able to see the pattern here:  the forms for “my” and “his/her” 
differ according to the grammatical gender of the noun.  These examples show how 
grammatical gender has nothing to do with biosocial gender:  a person‟s fat is no more 
female or male than someone‟s seat or spoon. 
Gender is an arbitrary division of nouns for the purposes of agreement – and 
that‟s all it is. 
3.4.4.  English has no gender 
In English, adjectives and verbs do not have gender forms.  To put it another way, 
nouns are not divided into genders with which adjectives and verbs should agree.  
English does not have gender. 
It is true that the pronouns he and she differentiate the “gender” of nouns they 
refer to.  But we are talking here about biosocial, not grammatical gender. 
How about the fact, however, that countries, ships, cars, and such are sometimes 
referred to as a she? (“Canada has given her best sons to the war effort.”)   
You will find an answer to this question when we discuss metaphor (ch. 5). 
 Morphology 
In the last chapter we studies the structure of the sentence (syntax).  Sentences can be 
said to be made up of words.  Our next task is to look at the structure of the word.  The 
study of word structure is called morphology.   
One might think that the word is the smallest meaningful unit of language.  Not so.  
There are elements of the word that themselves carry meaning. 
4.1.  Morphemes 
The following English words obviously consist of more than one unit.  They can be 
divided as follows: 
sipp ed 
care ful ly  
shoe s  
anti dis establish ment ari an ism  
In doing this, we are not dividing the above words into syllables. We are dividing 
them into meaningful units (though these may coincide with syllables).  
The smallest meaningful units in language are called morphemes. Some students 
wonder how it can be said that -ed in sipped is meaningful. However, it clearly is so. If --
ed did not add any meaning to sip then sip and sipped would mean the same thing.  
(That the p doubles, by the way, is a matter of writing, an orthographic 
convention that is not relevant to our discussion here. We are dea1ing primarily with 
spoken, not written language. We do not add another p in speech, though we do in 
writing.)  
There are many different kinds of meaning in language. Two of them are referred 
to as lexical and grammatical meaning. Note that sip has referential meaning, but -ed has 
only grammatical meaning (past time).  
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
various ASP.NET platforms. Support to view PDF document online in browser such as firefox, chrome, safari and so on. Support ASP.NET MVC
chrome pdf from link; add link to pdf file
C# PDF Markup Drawing Library: add, delete, edit PDF markups in C#
A web based markup tool able to annotate PDF in browser such as chrome, firefox and safari in ASP.NET WebForm application. Support
adding links to pdf document; pdf hyperlinks
A special kind of morpheme is the zero morpheme. The zero morpheme is not 
pronounced at all).  It is the lack of sound, so to speak, that creates the meaning here. We 
have already used the zero morpheme in 3.4.1. above.  To take another example,  
university  
can be more properly represented as 
university- 
The zero here indicates that the word university is singular. Compare it to the 
plural,  
universitie-s  
(Again, the difference in spe11ing, - university vs. universitie,  fo11ows a 
spelling convention that has no effect on speech.)  
Figuratively speaking, the singular is expressed by taking away the plural ending 
s and not substituting any sound for it.  
However, since all English nouns have a - ending in the singular, we often 
ignore it in discussing the morphemes that make up a word.  
The zero ending always has only grammatical meaning.  
4.2.  Morphemes and Allomorphs  
Some morphemes have more than one variant.   
Often one variant occurs when the morpheme is free, that is to say, it is a word on 
its own, as is the case with sane or nation.  The same morphemes are pronounced 
differently (again, ignore spelling conventions) when found with other morphemes within 
the same word:  insanity, international.  In this case these same morphemes (san/sane, 
nation) are bound morphemes. 
Consider that we can also describe sane as -sane-, and nation as -nation-
.  A free morpheme can be described by the formula 
-_______- 
where _______ indicates the position of the morpheme. - and - (“initial zero 
and final zero”) are the free morphemes‟ context (the environment in which they are 
found). 
The bound variants of our two morphemes can be similarly described as follows:   
a)
insanity has the san/sane morpheme in the position  
in-_______-ity 
Initial in and final ity are the morpheme‟s context. 
b)
international has the nation morpheme in the position 
inter-_______-al 
The context in which the morpheme nation is found here is: initial inter and final 
al. 
The variants of a morpheme (such as san and sane and the two variants of 
nation) are called allomorphs 
Allomorphs are positional variants of a morpheme. They occur in mutually 
exclusive positions.  In our example, the mutually exclusive positions were:  “between 
zeros” vs. “elsewhere.”  
In the above examples, the context that defined each allomorph‟s position was 
other morphemes.  There are other examples where it is not other morphemes, but the 
type of sound found in the context that matters. 
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
An ASP.NET web-server compliant library able to highlight text in PDF file online in browser such as chrome, firefox, safari, etc.
pdf link open in new window; pdf link to attached file
VB.NET Word: Create VB.NET Word Document Viewer in Web, Windows
in one of above mentioned VB.NET Word document viewers, please follow the link to see If needed, you can try VB.NET PDF document file viewer SDK, and VB.NET
add links to pdf; change link in pdf file
Consider the plural of the English noun.  The following table shows some of the 
regularities in the way the plural is formed in different positions.  Note that the form of 
the allomorph depends on the preceding sound alone.  Again ignore spelling.  The 
“letters” we use to describe the sounds of a language (e.g. č, b, d) are part of a linguistic 
transcription.  We will come back to them later.  For now let us say only that č  
represents the sound that is often spelled ch, and š the sound often spelled sh. 
Position 
Allomorph 
Example 
č _______ 
-I
churches 
j _______ 
-I
judges 
š _______ 
-I
marshes 
d _______ 
-z 
rods 
b _______ 
-z 
labs 
g _______ 
-z 
hogs 
t _______ 
-s 
rats 
p _______ 
-s 
tops 
k _______ 
-s 
cooks 
4.3. Affixes  
The word can be divided into a base and its affixes.  In the word decriminalize, 
criminal is the base; de- and -ize are affixes.  Affixes include prefixes, suffixes, and 
infixes. 
de / criminal / ize  
prefix / BASE / suffix  
Prefixes precede the base; suffixes follow it.  
Infixes interrupt the base:  
Greek  
la-m-bano 
'I take'  
Here the base is lab 'take.' -ano is a suffix. -m- means 'I' (''first person'') and it is an 
infix. 
Oregon (Native Indian language)  
ho-ts-wat “non-Indians” is formed from the base  howat '”non-Indian.”  What is 
the meaning of the infix -ts- ?  
4.4.  Examples of ''Exotic'' Morphology  
Inuktitut (Inuit language of the Central and Eastern Arctic)  
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Create Online TIFF Document Viewer
modern browsers, including IE, Chrome, Firefox, Safari more web viewers on PDF and Word <link href="RasterEdge_Imaging_Files/RasterEdge.css" rel="stylesheet"type
add links to pdf in acrobat; pdf reader link
C# Word: How to Create Word Online Viewer in C# Application
including IE (Internet Explorer), Chrome, Firefox, Safari you can go to PDF Web Viewer <link href="RasterEdge_Imaging_Files/RasterEdge.css" rel="stylesheet"type
pdf hyperlinks; convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks
Inuktitut has words made up of a strikingly large (theoretically infinite) number of 
morphemes. Its words can be, much more often than in other languages, sentences in 
themselves.  
ajji liu ruti qa ruma vuq  
same make tool have want he/she  
''He/she wants a camera''  
Note: It is easier to translate Inuktitut words if one reads the morphemes in 
reverse, from the last morpheme to the first.  
Chippewyan ( ''Chip'' - native language of Alberta, etc.)  
All of the suffixes below express the meaning ''to handle.''  
Suffix Meaning  
- a 
to handle a round solid object  
- ta  to handle a long stick-like object  
-tsu  to handle fabric  
- dzay to handle a grain-like object  
- ti 
to handle a living being  
- ka  to handle a liquid in a vessel  
 Language, Meaning and Culture 
The last example, from Chippewyan, raises some issues about language, culture, and 
thought.  It appears that to be a Chippewyan speaker, one would have to learn to 
constantly pay attention to the shape of objects and to classify them in the way suggested 
by Chippewyan morphology, rather than in any other way.  It would lead to a distinctive 
way of contemplating the physical universe.  It might be that abstract concepts (such as 
“time” or “love”) are also shaped by the language we speak.  This would mean that 
speaking a distinct language is associate with a distinct way of understanding the world.  
A distinct way of understanding the world, associated with a distinct group of people, is 
part of what we mean by “culture,” one of the central concepts of anthropology. 
In this chapter we interrupt our investigation of linguistic structure, to see how what we 
have learned so far is related to culture as a way of understanding the world. 
That each language creates a different way of looking at the world is a popular idea with 
a long history.  In the nineteenth century, it was proposed among others by the linguist 
Wilhelm von Humboldt and the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche in Germany. 
In North America this old idea became associated with a rather obscure fire inspector 
called Benjamin Lee Whorf, who was active into the nineteen forties.  
5.1.  The Whorf Hypothesis 
Whorf wrote that when he was a fire inspector he witnessed the following 
incident. 
In a wood distillation plant the metal stills were insulated with a 
composition prepared from limestone and called at the plant “spun 
limestone.”  No attempt was made to protect this covering from excessive 
heat or the contact of flame.  After a period of use, the fire below one of 
the stills spread to the “limestone,” which to everyone‟s great surprise 
burned vigorously.  Exposure to acetic acid fumes from the stills and 
converted part of the limestone (calcium carbonate) to calcium acetate.  
This when heated in a fire decomposes, forming inflammable acetone.  
Behavior that tolerated fire close to the covering was induced by use of the 
name “limestone,” which because it ends in “-stone” implies non-
combustibility. 
This is example shows how, Whorf thought, having a word in a language 
influences the way we think of the referent of that word.  But most of his work was not 
on words but on morphemes.  For example, he noted that a native language of the 
American Southwest, Hopi, did not have the tense morphemes that Indo-European 
languages do (e.g. past tense suffixes like –ed in English).  He concluded that therefore 
the Hopi did not think of time as past, present, and future.  Whorf pointed out that Hopi 
has verbal suffixes that imply a different view of time:  a cyclical one where the same 
period returns time and time again.  In complicated ways that we cannot cover here, he 
used Hopi morphology to argue that the Hopi language was better suited for discussing 
relativistic physics, with its conflation of space and time, than were was what he called 
SAE (Standard Average European – languages like English, French, or Russian). 
It is important to note that to Whorf differences within SAE were not great 
enough to merit discussion. 
Many of Whorf‟s specific points have not withstood the test of time.  However, 
the general idea, that language influences culture-specific ways of understanding the 
world, still stimulates debate.  It is known as the Whorf hypothesis (or, sometimes, 
including a reference to Whorf‟s teacher Edward Sapir, as the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis). 
5.2. 
Vocabulary:  “Rich points”
Michael Agar is a linguist who has discussed the type of words that only 
competent speakers of the language can truly understand.  Such words are difficult to 
translate.  Agar calls them “rich points.”  He believes that for the most part translating 
one language into another is not a problem.  Most concepts do not vary much in meaning 
from one language to another (and, by implication, from one culture to another).  The 
exception are the rich points.  It is they that mark important culture-specific meanings. 
schmäh is an example of a rich point, a German word Agar learned in Vienna.  It 
expresses the view that life is not very meaningful, rather ridiculous, so it makes no sense 
to try to do something about it.   
What would be a rich point in English?  People often answer with terms of 
technology, expressing a prejudice according to which technology is somehow a North 
American preserve.  In fact television, automobile, etc. a) are often not English words in 
terms of their origin, and b) are very easy to understand if any speaker is shown the 
objects they refer to, even for the first time. 
Abstract terms are more difficult to translate. 
A good candidate for an English rich point is the common adjective nice.  Of 
course, rich points are a relative matter:  a word from language A may be hard to translate 
to language B, but not to language C.  It would probably be difficult, however, to find 
another language where a word covers the same meanings as the word nice.  Other 
ordinary words like love may be easier to translate, but might not cover exactly the same 
range of meanings.  Some newer English words, like cool when it does not refer to 
temperature, are also good candidates for a rich point. 
5.3.  Metaphoric systems 
There are many elements other than simple words that may correspond to the 
shared world view of a group. 
Below are some examples of what we call metaphoric systems. 
“Time is a commodity” 
We’ve run out of time. 
This machine saves time. 
My time is valuable. 
Time is money. 
“Vehicles are women” 
Fill’er up with regular. 
She’ll be good for another ten years (said about a vehicle). 
“Argument is war” 
Hadley destroyed Bridgman’s argument. 
Your claims are indefensible. 
His criticism was right on target. 
If you use that strategy, he’ll wipe you out. 
5.4.
Symbolic classifications 
Many, perhaps all, cultures divide the world into large groups of referents that can 
be opposed to each other. In the civilizations of East Asia, distinctions are made 
systematically between two classes of “things” called yin and yang, respectively.  
Here are some examples of items in each category: 
yin   
yang 
woman 
man 
moon  
earth 
passive 
active 
smooth 
rough 
plain   
mountain 
water  
rocks 
This is a kind of metaphorical system, where each element is metaphorically 
associated with all the others in its category.  “Woman,” for example, is 
associated with “water.”  Most of the associations appear to be as devoid of any 
special sense as the gender categories of French or Zulu (ch. 3 – gender may 
perhaps reflect lost symbolic classifications, like yin and yang).  But some of 
them certainly embody social expectations, such as the association of women with 
the passive and men with the active principle. 
Symbolic classifications are seldom named or explicitly declared, as they are in 
the yin / yang system known as tao.  But they may exist in other languages and cultures, 
including English.   
Try this experiment.  Start with two columns labeled 
Reason 
Passion 
Now put one concept from each of the following pairs of concepts in one of the 
two columns.  Use your first reaction as a member of the culture.  Do not try to be 
“politically correct” or otherwise give the “right answer.” 
sun, moon; man, woman; water, rocks; desert, forest; organic, inorganic; 
machine, human; animal, human 
If you compare your answers with those of others, you might find a surprising 
degree of agreement between your answers and theirs. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested