view pdf winform c# : Add hyperlink to pdf in Library SDK component asp.net .net web page mvc word%20sign%20culture2-part1367

6 Phonology 
We have diverted from our analysis of linguistic structure, to show how at the level of 
words and morphemes we can make important connections to culture and society. 
This is so at each level of linguistic analysis.  We will now go “below” the level of the 
morphology into the sound system of languages.  This is an important threshold to pass.  
Morphemes are the smallest meaningful units of language.  The units of the sound system 
that we are now going to look at carry no meaning in the same sense.  However, they are 
associated with social meanings.  How we pronounce language is an element in the way 
we interact with others and are perceived by them. 
6.1. General 
No two speakers speak the same way.  This principle allows us to recognize each 
other as individuals. 
Yet when speaker A makes an utterance, say “Are my eggs ready?”, all speakers 
of the language have the feeling that what was said is “exactly” the same as when speaker 
B says the same thing.   (“Hey, you got my eggs?” means the same thing but is not 
“exactly the same” in terms of what was said.)  When people say exactly the same thing, 
we say they said the same thing “word for word.”  But this assumes that we can tell when 
people said the “same word.”  And we can do that because, to our ears, when two people 
say the same word they use the same sounds. 
That people use the same sounds is not literally true.  It is the difference in Mom 
and Dad‟s sounds that lets you know which one of them said “Please come home”  The 
point is that you have an unconscious and rather mysterious ability to ignore the 
differences between their sounds, and distil only the similarities.  This ability makes you 
believe that Mom and Dad both began their utterance with the same sound, which we 
spell p and (in “please”) followed it with the same sound, spelled l. 
In some way, a speaker of a language can classify all the different examples of a p 
as the same thing, and all the example of an l as the same thing. 
Curiously, however, there are rather major variations that speakers do not notice.  
For example, English speakers do not notice the difference between a p pronounced with 
a little puff of air after it (linguists write this as p
h
) and a p pronounced without such a 
puff of air (p
=
).  Yet both occur in English:  we say p
h
at the beginning of pit, but p
=
at 
the beginning of spit.  The difficulty we have in noticing the difference is related to the 
fact that in English substituting p
for p
h
does not change the meaning of a word.   
In some other languages, such as Hindi-Urdu, it does.  Hindi speakers hear it 
easily and all the time. 
A part of linguistics is to study which sound distinctions are important in a 
language in the way that p
and p
=
are in Hindi-Urdu, but not in English.  This part of 
linguistics is called phonology.  It differs from phonetics in that the latter studies sounds 
or phones regardless of the way distinctions among them function in the language. 
6.2  
“Accent”
Making and perceiving subtle sound distinctions – in other words, understanding 
the phonology – is a prerequisite for speaking a language with a native “accent.”  (There 
are, however, many other relevant factors as well.)  Speaking with a “foreign accent” 
Add hyperlink to pdf in - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding a link to a pdf in preview; adding links to pdf document
Add hyperlink to pdf in - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlinks to pdf online; pdf links
indexes a speaker as not native-born.  Not being native-born is an important fact in many 
societies such as ours.  It has a serious effect on how one is perceived and treated by 
others.  The perception others have of us as a native or non-native speaker is internalized. 
“Accents” that are not foreign (e.g. a “British accent” in Canada) are not generally 
speaking a matter of phonology but of phonetics – the nature of the sounds used, not how 
distinctions are made among them. 
According to many researchers a foreign accent is inevitable if a speaker learns a 
language after a “critical period” that occurs between 11 and 14 years of age.  Most 
likely, this is indeed the case but only if the language that one learns is different enough.  
Unusual German speakers sometimes learn English without a foreign accent, even if they 
only begin to be exposed to it significantly after the age of 14.  It seems that Italian, 
Russian, or Chinese speakers can never perform the same feat. 
More important to anthropologists is the fact that foreign accents, like other subtle 
speech variations, help to divide people into groups whose identity, formed in large 
measure by using language, is important in determining the roles they play in society. 
6.3. Concepts needed to understand phonology 
Position and Context 
We have already investigated the concept of “position” in our look at morphology 
(ch. 4).  Recall that in some cases, the sounds around a morpheme (its context) determine 
which allomorph will be used.  We also mentioned that allomorphs are found in mutually 
exclusive positions or (which amounts to the same thing) contexts. 
A similar situation occurs at the level of the sound system, although it is more 
difficult for us to become aware of this than of variation and position at the 
morphological level. 
Some similar sounds or phones occur in mutually exclusive positions, i.e. one 
never occurs in the same position as the other.  The trouble is that in those cases – as with 
the pair p
and p
=
that we just mentioned above - people may have trouble perceiving the 
difference between the phones at all. 
Phoneme and allophone 
Let us stay with this example.  In many varieties of English,  
a)
p
occurs at the beginning of stressed syllables, and  
b)
occurs everywhere else (for example, after s as in spit). 
“Mutually exclusive contexts” here means that p
occurs only in the position 
described in a), while p
occurs only in position b). 
Similar phones that are in mutually exclusive positions are said to be 
allophones
of the same 
phoneme
A phoneme is, thus, a unit of a languages sound system that may include two or 
more positional variants or allophones, in much the same way that a morpheme 
may include two or more allomorphs.  The position of an allophone is always 
defined in terms of other sound units in its context. 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Word to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
add url link to pdf; pdf email link
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Excel to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
accessible links in pdf; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
This is the simplest way to define a phoneme (though it may seem daunting to 
some beginning students!), and a rather old-fashioned one.  It will do for our 
purposes, however. 
6.4.  Each language imposes its own phonology on the sounds of 
its language. 
We have referred to the difference in which the English and the Hindi-Urdu 
speaker will typically “hear” their p type sounds.  Here is another example to illustrate 
how we do not hear sounds “objectively,” but rather through a “filter” supplied by the 
phonology of our language. 
In some dialects of Spanish, the sounds d
>
and đ are allophones of the phoneme, 
d.  (The transcription symbol d
stands for a d
sound that is pronounced with the tip of 
the tongue on the top inside part of the front teeth.  đ stands for a sound not unlike what 
we spell with a th in this.  For transcription symbols, see chapter 7).  The mutually 
exclusive positions are as follows: 
a)
đ is found only between vowels, and 
b)
d
is found elsewhere. 
6.5.  Minimal pairs 
In English, the situation regarding đ is quite different.  We have just said that it is 
spelled with th in a word like this.  (Caution:  there is in English a different sound 
that is also spelled th.  Compare this and through.  The th is not the same sound 
in each.  More on this in chapter 7.)  It is NOT one of the variants of d.  In the 
examples below, notice how đ and d are found in exactly the same position.  We 
are using linguistic transcription, as well as ordinary spelling, to point out 
inconsistencies such as where English spells the ending ay of die and of Thy in 
two different ways (ie and y), even though there is not difference in 
pronunciation.  
Position 
Examples 
spelling 
transcription 
_______  ay   
die, Thy 
day, đay 
_______  ow   
dough, though  
dow, đow 
_______  en   
den, then 
den, đen 
Finding examples like these where two phones occur in exactly the same 
environment is enough to prove that they are NOT allophones of the same phoneme in 
the language being investigated.  Two words found in the same context (such as die and 
Thy or den and then) are called minimal pairs, because they differ in only one phone. 
Other examples of minimal pairs in English are:  pat/bat, wine/vine, erect/elect. 
Make sure you understand why minimal pairs are the proof that two phones are a) 
not in mutually exclusive positions, and so b) not positional variants and c) not 
allophones of the same phoneme but elements that belong to two different phonemes. 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. Hyperlink Edit. XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document
pdf link to specific page; add links to pdf file
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. Hyperlink Edit. XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF
add link to pdf; add email link to pdf
 Phonetics 
Now we “descend” to an even lower level of linguistic analysis, still within the 
sound system.  At the level of the phoneme or phonology we were looking at how 
languages separate sounds into distinctive units called phonemes.  We saw there one 
illustration of the important point that culture and language have a great role in 
determining even such apparently natural processes as our perception of speech sounds.  
To complete the picture a little more, we in this chapter have a brief look at how linguists 
study some of the sounds “themselves,” apart from the way they are classified into 
phonemes.  The field of linguistics devoted to this kind of analysis is called phonetics. 
7.1.  The two types of phonetics 
Acoustic phonetics 
Acoustic phonetics is the study of the physical properties of speech sounds, such 
as their characteristic frequency distribution. 
Acoustic phonetics is not generally of interest to linguists and anthropologists as 
much as to physicists, to engineers producing synthetic voice, etc. 
Articulatory phonetics 
Articulatory phonetics is the study of the way sounds are produced in the “vocal 
apparatus.” 
Places of articulation are ways of allowing the spots in the human body that play 
a major role in producing speech sounds. 
Manners of articulation are ways of allowing the breath to pass through places of 
articulation, thereby producing sounds. 
“Oscar” is an image of the oral and nasal cavities and of the larynx (throat).  A 
version of Oscar reproduced in Appendix One. 
The places of articulation as described in Oscar, together with the manner of 
articulation define each speech sound of a language.  All consonants and vowels of all 
languages can be described in terms of place and manner of articulation.  The Chart of 
English Consonants (Appendix Two) gives the symbols used to transcribe the consonants 
of English, and defines the place and manner of their articulation. 
Without a linguistic transcription, it would be impossible to represent the sounds 
of a language accurately so that there is only one symbol per sound. 
For additional information on phonetics, consult any introductory linguistics 
textbook.  Unfortunately, as linguists use more than one transcription system and more 
than one set of terms for places and manners of articulation, consulting a text may do 
more harm than good to some students. 
7.2   Emic and Etic 
There is a parallel between the “emic” units (phonemic, morphemic) on the one 
hand and their “etic” subunits (phones, morphs – cf. “phonetics”) on the other.  The first 
are units understood as such only by those who know the language.  The second can be 
easily noted by an outsider.   
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. C#.NET Sample Code: Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
add hyperlinks to pdf; add links to pdf acrobat
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Insert text, text box into PDF. Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add,
add hyperlink to pdf in; pdf edit hyperlink
A researcher will first note the etic units.  Understanding the emic ones will 
require intensive exposure to the language. 
This distinction has been useful to social and cultural anthropologists, who have 
extended it to descriptions of culture.  An “etic” description of a culture makes all 
possible distinctions; an “emic” one notes those that are significant (consciously or 
otherwise) to the participants in the culture.  If we are outsiders then only an emic 
description “gets us into the head” of the people participating in the culture we are 
studying.  If we study our own culture then only an emic descriptions makes explicit the 
categories of our culture that we follow, unreflectingly, in our daily lives. 
8. 
Language and Social Identity 
We are now ready to return to the major issue in linguistic and semiotic anthropology:  
how linguistic and other signs play a role in the production and reproduction of culture 
and society.  We have looked at culture in chapter 5; here our focus is on society. 
In Chapter 6 we saw that a speaker with a “foreign accent” is perceived in a distinctive 
way by others, and tends to internalize that perception.  The speaker is assigned an 
identity that he or she may not otherwise develop.  Immigrants may develop identities 
such as “Latin” or “East European,” which in their country of origin either make little 
sense or are far less important than more specific identities (like “Chilean” or “Slovene”).  
One reason is the way people classify their accent. 
There are other, more subtle ways in which variation in the way people speak functions in 
creating and perpetuating social distinctions.  Chief among these are ways of speaking 
that index (see 2.1.4 above) social class.  Social class dialects are the best studied 
example of social dialects or sociolects.  Others are age and gender dialects. 
8.1.  Standard and non-standard language  
Many languages, especially those spoken in or stemming from Europe, have a 
form that the public considers to be “correct.”  For example, 
I’m not comin’ until you call. 
is considered to be the wrong way to say what is, in correct English, 
I’m not coming until you call. 
Yet the first sentence is no less correct than the other.  It is not a mistake, like 
I’m no coming until you call. 
Rather, it is a sentence that has no doubt been said many times by different people 
in the English-speaking world, including native speakers. 
The distinction between “correct” and “incorrect” language is, very simply, a 
matter of tradition and more or less unconscious social class prejudice. 
8.1.1. Standard language and hegemony 
The forms labeled “incorrect” are more common among the less privileged social 
strata, principally the working class.  Those labeled “correct” are more 
characteristic of middle class speech.  Language scholars avoid the terms 
“correct” and “incorrect” when describing variation in a language.  Instead, they 
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Export PowerPoint hyperlink to PDF. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting PowerPoint to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
adding hyperlinks to pdf; chrome pdf from link
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Export PowerPoint hyperlink to PDF in .NET console application. C#.NET Demo Code: Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET Application. Add necessary references:
add links to pdf in preview; add page number to pdf hyperlink
speak of  “standard” and “non-standard” speech.  Standard speech is based on 
upper middle class norms. 
It is a half-truth that the reason working class people use more non-standard 
language is that they have less education than middle class people.  Educational 
institutions do inculcate the use of the standard in their students.  But middle class 
speakers do not need to learn it at school.  It is their sociolect to start with.   
Schools teach the middle-class sociolect to working class students, and aim to 
convince them that the middle-class way of speaking is “more correct.”  
Generally speaking, they succeed.  The process whereby the socially subordinate 
learn unquestioning acceptance of  their subordination is called hegemony by 
some scholars.  The spread of the standard, and of judgments about its 
“correctness,” is part of hegemony. 
8.1.2. Everyone uses some non-standard language 
While hegemony fosters the use of the standard variety, there are other social 
forces that tend to preserve the use of the non-standard.  Most non-standard language 
variants are used by all social strata.  It is not that the upper middle class do not use them 
at all.  They just use them less. 
The following was found to be the rate of “double negative” use among Blacks in 
Detroit: 
Upper middle class   
2% 
Lower middle class   
11% 
Upper working class  
38% 
Lower working class  
70% 
Note also that everyone, including the lower working class, uses some standard 
language.   
The following data are about “dropping” the final –s of the third person singular, 
producing examples like 
She know.  He go ever so fast. 
Norwich, England   
Detroit (African Americans) 
Middle Middle Class  
0%   
Upper Middle Class   
1% 
Lower Middle Class   
2%   
Lower Middle Class   
10% 
Upper Working Class  
70%   
Upper Working Class  
57% 
Middle Working Class 
87%   
Lower Working Class  
71% 
Lower Working Class  
97% 
(Social class classifications vary from researcher to researcher.  This explains the 
different terms for Norwich and Detroit, for the data were gathered by different linguists 
in each place.) 
8.2.  Why non-standard sociolects persist 
The above data (and there is a huge amount of other information from other places all 
pointing in the same direction) confirm that in spite of widespread schooling non-
standard forms continue to persist, and they do so among practically all speakers.  
The reasons for this are not very well understood. 
One fact that may be relevant is that all speakers normally increase the standard or 
middle-class features in their speech on formal occasions, while moving in the 
direction of the non-standard or working-class end of the variation on informal 
occasions.  (Formal occasions are speech performances which require one to pay 
attention to one‟s speech –giving a lecture, doing a job interview, etc.) 
This means that even for middle class speakers non-standard, working class speech 
represents informality.   
In addition, it represents solidarity for working class speakers. 
It has been demonstrated by sociolinguists that people change their speech according 
to whom they speak to.  For example, a travel agent was recorded using the highest 
level of standardness with clients she thought of as superior to her in social standing, 
and the lowest level with those she thought were below her on the same account.  She 
used her most comfortable, “home” level, with clients she thought were of the same 
social status as herself. 
These facts mean that a working class person is under no compunction to use the 
standard when speaking informally to people he or she perceives as similarly working 
class.  Indeed, using the standard in that social context would be inappropriate and 
counterproductive to maintaining friendships and other solidary relations. 
8.3.  Gender 
In addition to work on social class and social dialects, there is a large and growing 
literature on how men and women speak differently. 
In the nineteen-seventies, Robin Lakoff was the first important linguist to write about 
the difference, although feminist activists who were not linguists had done so much 
before her. 
Lakoff claimed that women were more likely to use frivolous expressions that would 
confirm them as frivolous people with no claim to power (another example of 
hegemony!).  Examples are: 
oh, dear! (where, says Lakoff, a man would exclaim oh, shit!) 
brother! 
isn’t he cute? 
Lakoff also claimed that women used more linguistic features that express hesitation, 
because they are meant to be less decisive than men – such as tag questions and 
hesitating intonation. 
Tag questions 
It‟s five o‟clock, isn’t it? 
You‟d stop for her, wouldn’t you? 
Hesitating intonation 
When is the final? 
April twenty-fifth? 
There was this guy?  An’ he was standing at the corner?  An’ my aunt came by? … 
More recent research has put most of Lakoff‟s claims in doubt.  Yet important, if more 
complicated, differences between men and women‟s speech have been shown to exist.  
These may be more at the level of conversational strategies than of phonology or syntax. 
8.4.  The linguistic construction of society 
Early sociolinguistic research was concerned mainly with correlating linguistic and 
social variation.  This variationist work still continues, but the amount of data is now 
so extensive and conclusive as to permit more theoretical work aimed at 
understanding why the variation takes place. 
One suggestion is that knowledge of the standard represents cultural capital and that 
this is something that is sought for and competed for by social actors along with 
economic capital (wealth).  Cultural capital is not, of course, independent of 
economic capital. 
Together with the concept of hegemony, the concept of cultural capital is among 
those that have been advanced as tools in our growing understanding of how subtle 
phonological, syntactic, and conversational differences are indispensable to the 
functioning of a society characterized by social inequality. 
As people use language, including its sociolectal variants, they are not just reflecting 
social inequality.  They are constructing it at the same time.  A living “society” could 
no more exist without the activity of people relating to each other than a living 
“language” could exist without people speaking.  And people relating to each other 
includes speaking as well. 
 Popular Culture and the Media 
Part of the process of constructing society through exchanging linguistic and other signs 
involves popular culture.  This is an all-important arena where people are engaged today 
in making sense of their relationship to society.  Examples of popular culture are popular 
magazines and novels, advertising, popular science, food fads, comic books, popular 
music, youth subcultural fashions, etc., and last but not least television.  One way in 
which popular culture functions to construct society and culture is by defining – through 
various types of interaction with the public such as television ratings – what is to be 
strived for:  what constitutes glamour, or prudence, or “family values.”  This is especially 
true of television shows.   
Not all popular culture simply spreads the hegemony of upper-middle-class values.  
Much of it is diametrically opposed to it.  For the relationship between popular culture 
(including television) and the powers that be is a complicated one. 
In this chapter we explore three different attitudes to the significance of popular culture in 
our type of society: the mass culture critique, the free enterprise view, and the 
conformity-resistance paradigm. 
9.1. Goods as signs 
In the type of society we live in today, all goods are signs.  We buy them not only 
for their use value but also for what they symbolize.  Cars, perfumes, hair styles, jeans, 
and even tomatoes are packaged or presented in a way that signifies something to us 
about ourselves and our place in society:  our “image.”  (The word image is a good 
example of a “rich point,” see ch. 5.)  
Popular culture is “made of” goods.  It is a commercial culture.  We do not make 
its products, but use them to “express ourselves.”  When we buy a product we accept its 
intended meaning (status, sex appeal, our individuality, etc.) or we might read our own 
meaning into it (see about the “conformity-resistance paradigm” below).  Because the 
products we use are signs, popular culture is a culture of consuming signs. 
Language consists of signs (e.g. words) as well.  We have seen that the way we 
use linguistic signs helps to constitute social inequality.  There is a standard variety of 
language, modeled on the usage of the more privileged groups in society.  The rest of 
society concurs that the standard is “right” or “correct,” thereby putting “hegemony” into 
effect.  However, non-standard varieties compete with the standard and are invested with 
the value of solidarity. 
9.2. High culture and popular culture 
Popular culture is analogous to non-standard varieties.  It can be opposed to high 
culture, which could be said to be analogous to the standard.  There may be more logic to 
distinguishing high and low culture than standard and non-standard varieties of language, 
but not much more.  For example, opera is today the first example most people will give 
if asked what we mean by “high culture” (symphonic music, gallery art, a university 
education, and ballet are others).  However, in its heyday in the nineteenth century, opera 
was a rather popular “mid-brow” entertainment, enthusiastically attended by “ordinary” 
middle-class people.  Like the standard variety of language, high culture is high culture 
mainly not because of its inherent characteristics but because it is associated with the 
more prestigious elements of society and consequently carries cultural capital.   
9.3. The mass culture critique 
Until a few decades ago, there was as almost as much consensus about the 
prestige of high culture as there was about the standard.  A negative view of popular 
culture was quite wide-spread.   
Those on the political right complained that it was lowering the standards of taste 
in society, along with moral values that those on the right usually associate with 
traditional cultural preferences.   
Those on the left criticized popular culture as an entertainment, like the “bread 
and circus” of the Romans, that diverted the population from understanding its 
oppression and acting against it.  This criticism has received the label “mass culture 
critique.” 
9.4.  Criticisms of the media 
Today, more than a generation after the mass move of working-class people into 
the middle class that began in North America after World War II, there is much less 
prejudice against popular culture (with its working-class roots) than there once was, and 
much less respect for high culture.  Many wealthy people grew up, like their parents and 
grandparents, as consumers of popular culture.  Consequently, some forms of popular 
culture have acquired cultural capital that competes with the cultural capital of traditional 
high culture.  Jazz practically belongs to high culture today, but even other forms of 
music, like rock and roll or country and western, enjoy more status today.  The existence 
of serious collectors and historians devoted to such forms of entertainment is one aspect 
of this development.   
In these circumstances, unequivocal criticism of popular culture is less common 
than it once was.  Generally, criticism has been deflected to the media as purveyors of 
valueless popular culture.  Many people believe that the media: 
a)
make money by imposing their trash on people worldwide, via their 
financial power and command of satellite etc. technology, 
b)
cause sexism by depicting gender and sex in sexist ways, 
c)
diminish people‟s self respect by showing only the more privileged and 
the more beautiful in commercials, ads, and television programs, 
d)
cause violence by showing too much senseless violence. 
Do you agree with the following reply to the critics of the media? 
a)
there is no evidence for a causal link between the content of cultural 
products and behavior, 
b)
the critics arrogantly view the public as having no mind of its own:  
“people will watch what they‟re given,” 
c)
the critics arrogantly assume that people are unable to distinguish fiction 
from reality, 
d)
the media critics are often people with a professional stake in high culture 
(elite critics, professors, teachers, gallery artists) whose real message is 
“Give us the money and we‟ll make what people really should want.” 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested