view pdf winform c# : Add hyperlinks to pdf online control Library platform web page asp.net azure web browser word_of_mouth200612160-part1413

ESTIMATING THE DYNAMIC EFFECTS OF ONLINE WORD-OF-MOUTH ON 
MEMBER GROWTH OF INTERNET SOCIAL NETWORKS 
Michael Trusov, Randolph E. Bucklin, Koen Pauwels
1
Draft December 16, 2006
***Please do not cite or quote without permission of the authors*** 
1
Michael Trusov (Michael.Trusov@anderson.ucla.edu) is a doctoral candidate, Randolph E. Bucklin 
(randy.bucklin@anderson.ucla.edu) is a Professor of Marketing, Anderson School at UCLA, 110 Westwood Plaza, Los 
Angeles, CA 90095. Koen Pauwels (koen.h.pauwels@dartmouth.edu) is an Associate Professor, Tuck School of 
Business at Dartmouth, 100 Tuck Hall, Hanover, NH 03755.  
Add hyperlinks to pdf online - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf link; clickable links in pdf files
Add hyperlinks to pdf online - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding hyperlinks to pdf files; adding hyperlinks to pdf documents
ESTIMATING THE DYNAMIC EFFECTS OF WORD-OF-MOUTH 
REFERRALS ON MEMBER GROWTH OF INTERNET SOCIAL NETWORKS 
ABSTRACT 
While several sources tout the superiority of word-of-mouth over traditional marketing 
communication techniques, it still remains unclear how to measure word-of-mouth and how to 
to 
compare its relative effectiveness in improving long-term performance. Internet social 
networking sites offer an attractive opportunity to study word-of-mouth due to their consistent 
and efficient tracking of electronic referrals. The authors test for and find endogeneity among 
WOM-referrals, signups, event marketing and media appearances. A Vector Autoregressive 
(VAR) modeling approach captures this dynamic feedback system and gives estimates for the 
short-term and long-term effects on signups. The authors find that word-of-mouth benefits carry-
rry-
over much longer than traditional marketing actions do.  The long-run elasticity of signups to 
WOM appears close to 0.5 – at least 2.5 times larger than average advertising elasticities reported 
in the literature.  For the analyzed firm, the estimated WOM effect is about 20 times higher than 
the elasticity for marketing events, and 30 times larger than that of media appearances.  Using the 
contribution of advertising income from a signup, the authors calculate the economic value for a 
referral, providing an upper bound for financial incentives to stimulate word-of-mouth. 
Keywords:  Word-of-Mouth marketing, Internet, Social Networks, Vector Autoregression 
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
c# read pdf from url; adding an email link to a pdf
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links. How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Files in C#.NET Class. Add necessary references:
add links to pdf document; pdf link to email
Estimating the Dynamic Effects of Online Word-Of-Mouth 
Introduction 
Word-of-mouth (WOM) marketing has recently attracted a great deal of attention 
among practitioners. For example, several books tout word-of-mouth as a viable 
alternative to traditional marketing communication tools. One calls it “the world’s most 
effective, yet least understood marketing strategy” (Misner 1999). Marketers are 
particularly interested in gaining more understanding of word-of-mouth as traditional 
forms of communication appear to be losing effectiveness (Forrester 2005). Indeed, 
consumer attitudes toward advertising plummeted between September 2002 and June 
2004. Forrester (2005) reports that 40% fewer agree that ads are a good way to learn 
about new products, 59% fewer say they buy products because of their ads, and 49% 
fewer find ads entertaining.  
Meanwhile, WOM marketing strategies are appealing because they combine the 
promise of overcoming consumer resistance with significantly lower costs and fast 
delivery – especially through technology such as the Internet. Unfortunately, empirical 
evidence is currently scant regarding the relative effectiveness of WOM marketing 
compared to other marketing tools in increasing firm performance over time.  This raises 
the need for further study of how firms can best measure the effects of word-of-mouth 
communications and how WOM compares to other forms of marketing communication. 
WOM marketing is particularly prominent on the Internet. As one commentator 
stated, “Instead of tossing away millions of dollars on Superbowl ads, fledging dot-com 
companies are trying to catch attention through much cheaper marketing strategies such 
as blogging and word-of-mouth campaigns” (Whitman 2006). Now that many of these 
companies have “grown up” and venture capital is flowing back to their coffers (ibid, e.g. 
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
all PDF page contents in VB.NET, including text, image, hyperlinks, etc. Replace a Page (in a PDFDocument Object) by a PDF Page Object. Add necessary references:
adding a link to a pdf; convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks
VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in
PDF document is an easy work and gives quick access to PDF page and file, or even hyperlinks. How to VB.NET: Create Thumbnail for PDF. Add necessary references:
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; add link to pdf file
Estimating the Dynamic Effects of Online Word-Of-Mouth 
the Superbowl ads of Careerbuilder.com and GoDaddy.com), it is of broad interest to 
understand the relative effectiveness of word-of-mouth versus other marketing 
communication efforts. One of the fastest growing arenas of the World Wide Web is the 
space of so-called social networking sites (e.g., Friendster, Facebook, Xanga). These sites 
rely upon user-generated content to attract and retain visitors and obtain revenue 
primarily from the sale of online advertising. They also accumulate user information that 
may be valuable for targeted marketing purposes. The social network setting offers an 
attractive context to study word-of-mouth, as the sites provide easy-to-use tools for 
s for 
current users to invite others to join the network. They are also capable to record these 
activities. 
Internet companies commonly employ several types of WOM marketing 
activities. These include (1) viral marketing – creating entertaining or informative 
messages designed to be passed on by each message receiver, analogous to the spread of 
an epidemic, often electronically or by email; (2) referral programs – creating tools that 
at 
enable satisfied customers to refer their friends; and (3) community marketing – forming 
or supporting niche communities that are likely to share interests about the brand (such as 
user groups, fan clubs, and discussion forums) and providing tools, content, and 
information to support those communities.
2
In this paper, we examine one specific form of WOM activity: electronic referrals. 
Our objective is to estimate the elasticity, both short and long-run, of word-of-mouth 
outh 
referral activity at an Internet social networking site. We compare these elasticity 
estimates with those obtained for media appearances (public relations) and event 
2
A detailed overview of different forms of WOM marketing is available at the Word of Mouth Marketing 
Association web site (www.womma.org). 
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
by this .NET Imaging PDF Reader Add-on. Include extraction of text, hyperlinks, bookmarks and metadata; Annotate and redact in PDF documents; Fully support all
check links in pdf; add hyperlinks to pdf online
PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
advanced capabilities, such as text extraction, hyperlinks, bookmarks and Note: PDF processing and conversion is excluded in NET Imaging SDK, you may add it on
add hyperlink in pdf; active links in pdf
Estimating the Dynamic Effects of Online Word-Of-Mouth 
marketing – the main company-sponsored marketing activity. An important aspect of our 
ur 
approach is to recognize the potential endogeneity in customer acquisition, WOM 
activity, and other marketing communication efforts.  WOM may be endogenous because 
it not only influences new customer acquisition but is itself affected by the number of 
new customers.  Likewise, traditional marketing activities may stimulate WOM; they 
should be credited for this indirect effect as well as the direct effect they may have on 
customer acquisition. We empirically test for this endogeneity using Granger causality 
tests. We then develop a Vector Autoregression (VAR) model to handle endogeneity 
problem. We link variation in the number of newly acquired customers (signups) with the 
number of invitations (referrals) sent by existing members of the network to their friends 
outside the network.  The proposed model allows us to measure the short and long-run 
effects of WOM and to compare the effects of WOM with those of other marketing 
communications. 
Our empirical results from the social networking site show that WOM referrals 
strongly affect new customer acquisition. We estimate a long-run elasticity of 0.53. This 
is approximately 2.5 times higher than the average advertising elasticity reported in the 
literature (Hanssens et al 2001). For the company under study, WOM has a much 
stronger impact on new customer acquisition than traditional forms of marketing.  In 
particular, WOM elasticity is about 20 times higher than the elasticity for marketing 
events (0.53 vs. 0.026). We translate these findings into economic implications by 
calculating how much the average acquired customer contributes to firm revenues. This 
computation provides an upper limit to the financial incentives the firm could offer 
Estimating the Dynamic Effects of Online Word-Of-Mouth 
existing customers to stimulate word-of-mouth (a practice also growing rapidly in offline 
ne 
use).   
Research Background 
The earliest study on the effectiveness of WOM is survey-based (Katz and 
Lazarsfeld 1955). The authors found that WOM was seven times more effective than 
print advertising in influencing consumers to switch brands. Since the 1960s, word of 
mouth has been the subject of more than 70 marketing studies (Money et al 1998). 
Researchers have examined the conditions under which consumers are likely to rely on 
others’ opinions to make a purchase decision, the motivations for different people to 
spread-the-word about a product, and the variation in strength of influence people have 
on their peers in WOM communications. Consumer influence over other consumers has 
been demonstrated in scholarly research concerning social and communication networks, 
opinion leadership, source credibility, uses and gratifications, and diffusion of 
innovations (Phelps et al 2004). 
Until recently WOM research relied on experimental methods versus studying 
actual consumer actions in the marketplace. A major challenge in studying actual WOM 
is obtaining accurate data on interpersonal communications. Studying WOM on the 
Internet can help address this problem by offering an easy way to track online 
interactions. The Internet, of course, gives only a partial view of interpersonal 
communication; WOM exchange is not limited to the online world. Nevertheless, for 
some products or product categories, Internet measures of WOM could be a good proxy 
for overall WOM. We believe that for online communities, the electronic form of 
Estimating the Dynamic Effects of Online Word-Of-Mouth 
“spreading the word” is the most natural one. Thus, we suggest that online WOM should 
be a good proxy for overall WOM in the Internet social network setting of our study.  
Recent research has begun to study WOM in an Internet setting. De Bruyn and 
Lilien (2004) observed the reactions of 1,100 recipients after they received an unsolicited 
email invitation from one of their acquaintances to participate in a survey. They found 
that the characteristics of the social tie influenced recipients’ behaviors but had varied 
effects at different stages of the decision-making process: tie strength exclusively 
facilitated awareness, perceptual affinity triggered recipients’ interest, and demographic 
similarity had a negative influence on each stage of the decision-making process. Godes 
and Mayzlin (2004) suggest that online conversations (e.g., Usenet posts) could offer an 
easy and cost-effective opportunity to measure word of mouth. In an application to new 
television shows, they linked the volume and dispersion of conversations across different 
Usenet groups to offline show ratings. Chevalier and Mayzlin (2006) used book reviews 
posted by customers at Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com online stores as a proxy 
for WOM. The authors found that while most reviews were positive, an improvement in a 
book’s reviews led to an increase in relative sales at that site and the impact of a negative 
review was greater than the impact of a positive one. In contrast, Liu (2006) shows that 
both negative and positive WOM increase performance (box office revenue). Finally, 
Villanueva, Yoo and Hanssens (2006) compared customer lifetime value (CLV) for 
customers acquired through WOM vs. traditional channels. In an application to a web 
hosting company, the authors showed that marketing-induced customers add more short-
-
term value to the firm, but word-of-mouth customers added nearly twice as much long-
-
Estimating the Dynamic Effects of Online Word-Of-Mouth 
term value. However, the authors do not observe the marketing inputs and thus can not 
directly estimate the response of customer acquisition to WOM and to traditional efforts. 
Our paper differs from above studies in research question and application. First, 
we aim to directly compare the dynamic performance effects of word-of-mouth referrals 
with that of traditional marketing efforts and quantify the economic value of each WOM 
referral to the firm. Second, our empirical application is to an Internet social networking 
site, a novel setting for a marketing study.  
Internet social networking sites 
While still a relatively new Internet phenomenon, online social networking has 
already attracted attention from major industry payers. Microsoft, Google, Yahoo! and 
AOL are among companies offering online community services. According to Wikipedia 
(www.wikipedia.org), at present there are about 30 social networking web sites each with 
more than one million registered users and several dozen significant, though smaller, 
sites. In terms of web traffic, as of March 2006, ComScore MediaMetrix reports that the 
largest online social networking site was MySpace.com with 42 million unique visitors 
per month, followed by FaceBook.com with 13 million and Xanga.com with 7.4 million 
unique visitors. ComScore MediaMetrix numbers suggest that every second Internet user 
in the U.S. visits one of the top 15 social networking sites (Table 1).  
[Table 1. Social Networking Sites Ranking] 
A social networking site is typically initiated by a small group of founders who 
send out invitations to join the site to the members of their own personal networks. In 
turn, new members send invitations to their networks, and so on. Hence, invitations (i.e. 
Estimating the Dynamic Effects of Online Word-Of-Mouth 
WOM referrals) have been the foremost driving force for sites to acquire new members. 
Typical social networking sites allow a user to build and maintain a network of friends 
for social or professional interaction. In the core of a social networking site are 
personalized user profiles. Individual profiles are usually a combination of users’ images 
(or avatars), list of interests, music, books, movies preferences, and links to affiliated 
profiles (“friends”). Different sites impose different levels of privacy in terms of what 
information is revealed through profile pages to non-affiliated visitors and how far 
“strangers” vs. “friends” can traverse through the network of a profile’s friends. Profile 
holders acquire new “friends” by browsing and searching through the site and sending 
requests to be added as a friend. Other forms of relation formation also exist.  
In contrast to other Internet businesses, online communities rely upon user-
generated content to retain users. A community member has a direct benefit from 
bringing in more “friends” (e.g., through participating in the referral program), as each 
new member creates new content, which is likely to be of value to the inviting (referring) 
party. Typically, sites facilitate referrals by offering users a convenient interface for 
sending invitations to non-members to join the community. Figure 1 shows how two 
popular social networking sites, Friendster.com and Tribe.com, implement the referral 
process.  
[Figure 1. Referrals Process at Friendster.com and Tribe.com] 
Referrals made through the site’s provided interface are easily tracked. Some sites offer 
incentives to make a referral. For example, Netflix.com recently offered its existing 
customers to pass a “gift” of a month of free service to their non-member acquaintances. 
Estimating the Dynamic Effects of Online Word-Of-Mouth 
Many subscription-based services offer progressive discounts on monthly fees for each 
referral made.  
While the mechanics of social network formation through the WOM referrals 
process may be straightforward, little is known about the dynamics and sustainability of 
this process. Also, as social networking sites mature, they may begin to use traditional 
marketing tools. Management therefore may start to question the relative effectiveness of 
WOM at this stage. Our objective is to contribute a new set of empirical findings to this 
topic. 
Modeling Approach 
A typical social networking site has several ways to attract new customers, 
including event marketing (directly paid for by the company), media appearances 
(induced by PR) and word-of-mouth (WOM) referrals. How should we model the 
effectiveness of these communication mechanisms? As a base model, we may regress 
signups on events, media and WOM, controlling for deterministic components such as a 
base level (constant), a deterministic (time) trend, seasonality and lags of the dependent 
variable (Box and Jenkins 1970). The time trend is intended to capture external factors, 
including growth in Internet access, growth in people with high-speed bandwidth, general 
increases in content and interest in social networking sites. Seasonal patterns may be high 
(e.g. day-of-week) frequency, as most Internet use occurs during weekdays (Pauwels and 
Dans 2001) and low frequency, e.g. yearly holiday periods. Equation (1) specifies our 
base this model: 
6
1
1
J
t
t
t
t
i
t
t j
t
i
j
Y
X
M
E
C T
d
H
Y
!
"
=
=
=
+
+
+ + +
+
+
+
#
#
(1) 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested