view pdf winform c# : Change link in pdf software application dll winforms html azure web forms workshop_report_methodstoassessgeologicCO2storagecapacity0-part1439

 
The views expressed in this report do not necessarily reflect the views or policy of the International Energy Agency (IEA) 
Secretariat or of its individual member countries. The paper does not constitute advice on any specific issue or situation. The 
IEA makes no representation or warranty, express or implied, in respect of the paper’s content (including its completeness or 
accuracy) and shall not be responsible for any use of, or reliance on, the paper. Comments are welcome, directed to 
wolf.heidug@iea.org. 
© OECD/IEA, 2013 
Methods to assess geologic 
CO
2
 storage capacity: status 
and best practice 
 
Wolf Heidug 
Change link in pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf links; add a link to a pdf
Change link in pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding a link to a pdf; change link in pdf
INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCY
The International Energy Agency (IEA), an autonomous agency, was established in November 1974. 
Its primary mandate was – and is – two-fold: to promote energy security amongst its member 
countries through collective response to physical disruptions in oil supply, and provide authoritative 
research and analysis on ways to ensure reliable, affordable and clean energy for its 28 member 
countries and beyond. The IEA carries out a comprehensive programme of energy co-operation among 
its member countries, each of which is obliged to hold oil stocks equivalent to 90 days of its net imports. 
The Agency’s aims include the following objectives: 
n  Secure member countries’ access to reliable and ample supplies of all forms of energy; in particular, 
through maintaining effective emergency response capabilities in case of oil supply disruptions. 
n  Promote sustainable energy policies that spur economic growth and environmental protection 
in a global context – particularly in terms of reducing greenhouse-gas emissions that contribute 
to climate change. 
n  Improve transparency of international markets through collection and analysis of 
energy data. 
n  Support global collaboration on energy technology to secure future energy supplies 
and mitigate their environmental impact, including through improved energy 
efficiency and development and deployment of low-carbon technologies.
n  Find solutions to global energy challenges through engagement and 
dialogue with non-member countries, industry, international 
organisations and other stakeholders.
IEA member countries:
Australia
Austria 
Belgium
Canada
Czech Republic
Denmark
Finland 
France
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Ireland 
Italy
Japan
Korea (Republic of)
Luxembourg
Netherlands
New Zealand 
Norway
Poland
Portugal
Slovak Republic
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
United Kingdom
United States
The European Commission 
also participates in 
the work of the IEA.
© OECD/IEA, 2013
International Energy Agency 
9 rue de la Fédération 
75739 Paris Cedex 15, France
www.iea.org
Please note that this publication 
is subject to specific restrictions 
that limit its use and distribution. 
The terms and conditions are available online at  
http:
//
www.iea.org
/
termsandconditionsuseandcopyright
/
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB: Change and Update PDF Document Password.
add links to pdf document; pdf link to email
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To C# Sample Code: Change and Update PDF Document Password in C#.NET. In
add links to pdf in preview; add hyperlink pdf document
© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 3 
Table of contents 
Acknowledgements .......................................................................................................................... 5 
Executive Summary .......................................................................................................................... 6 
Introduction ...................................................................................................................................... 8 
Background ....................................................................................................................................... 8 
Defining geologic CO
2
 storage resources and assessment types .................................................. 10 
Classification of CCS capacity .................................................................................................. 10 
Constraints on CCS capacity .................................................................................................... 10 
The advantages of probabilistic assessments .................................................................. 11
 
Engineering, economic and socio‐political constraints ................................................... 11
 
Storage efficiency .................................................................................................................... 12 
Overview of current CO
2
 resource assessment methodologies .................................................... 14 
Significance of the differences between the assessment methodologies .............................. 16 
Methodological differences ............................................................................................. 16
 
Storage efficiency factors ................................................................................................ 16
 
Policy constraints ............................................................................................................. 16
 
Grouping of CO
2
 storage assessment methodologies ............................................................. 16 
Guidelines for CO
2
 storage assessment methods .......................................................................... 18 
Conducting TASR assessments ................................................................................................ 18 
Step 1 – Subdivision into geological units of assessment ................................................ 18
 
Step 2 – Estimation of the total volume of accessible pore space in each SAU using 
probabilistic methods ...................................................................................................... 19
 
Step 3 – Use consistent storage efficiency ranges ........................................................... 19
 
Step 4 – Convert the volume of CO
2
 to a mass of CO
2
 ..................................................... 19
 
Methods to estimate subsets of the TASR .............................................................................. 20 
Recommended steps for buoyant‐limited storage assessment .............................................. 20 
Step 5 ‐ Identify closure type ........................................................................................... 20
 
Step 6 ‐ Identify geologic models for existing traps ......................................................... 20
 
Step 7 ‐ Use geologic models as analogues ..................................................................... 20
 
Recommended steps for pressure‐limited CO
2
 storage assessments ..................................... 21 
Step 5– Determine present pressure of the injection site or formation ......................... 21
 
Step 6 – Identify injection rate to stay below maximum allowable pressure increase ... 21
 
Step 7 – Identify extent and depth of the pressure front ................................................ 21
 
Looking Ahead ................................................................................................................................ 22 
Conclusions ..................................................................................................................................... 22 
Annex 1: Comparison of CO
2
 storage capacity and resource assessment methodologies .......... 23 
Annex 2: Best practice examples of methodologies ..................................................................... 29 
TASR assessment methodology example (USGS methodology) ............................................. 29 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing options TargetResolution = 150.0F 'to change image compression
adding links to pdf; add hyperlink to pdf
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing TargetResolution = 150F; // to change image compression mode
add links pdf document; accessible links in pdf
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 4
Buoyant‐limited assessment methodology example (BGR methodology) .............................. 32 
Pressure‐limited assessment methodology example (TNO methodology) ............................. 33 
Annex 3: The USGS method for calculating residual storage efficiencies .................................... 35 
References ...................................................................................................................................... 36 
Acronyms, abbreviations and units of measure ............................................................................ 40 
Glossary ........................................................................................................................................... 41 
List of Figures  
Figure 1 • A schematic cross section through an SAU .................................................................... 29
 
Figure 2 • USGS CO
2
 storage assessment input form ..................................................................... 30
 
Figure 3 • Flow diagram of USGS CO
2
 TASR assessment methodology .......................................... 32
 
List of Tables 
Table 1 • Categorisation of reviewed storage resource assessment methodologies .................... 17 
Table 2 • Comparison of CO
2
 storage capacity and resource assessment methodologies for the 
United Kingdom, the United States, North America and Australia ................................. 23
 
Table 3 • Comparison of CO
2
 storage capacity and resource assessment methodologies for 
Queensland, Japan, the Netherlands, Germany and Norway ......................................... 26 
 
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
chrome pdf from link; add url link to pdf
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. FREE TRIAL: HOW TO:
pdf reader link; add hyperlink to pdf online
© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 5 
Acknowledgements 
This publication reflects the expertise and dedication of the individuals who participated in the 
workshops, and who provided the perspective and broad thinking that enabled the conclusions in 
this report to be reached. They comprise: 
Sean T. Brennan, United States Geological 
Survey (USGS); 
Rick Causebrook (now retired), Geoscience 
Australia; 
J. Peter Gerling, German Federal Institute for 
Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR); 
Sam Holloway, British Geological Survey 
(BGS); 
Henk Pagnier, Geological Survey of the 
Netherlands (TNO); 
Peter D. Warwick, USGS; and 
Don White, Geological Survey of Canada 
(GSC). 
 
Two individuals deserve special mention for the support they provided: Sean Brennan, who wrote 
much of the report’s content, and Sam Holloway, who provided important expertise throughout 
the duration of the project, from the preparation of the workshop to contributing to drafting this 
document. Thanks are also due to Filip Neele for providing text on the TNO methodology. 
The following participated as observers and provided valuable input: Amal Alawami (OPEC 
Secretariat), Andre Bocin‐Dumitriu (European Commission Joint Research Centre), Eva Halland 
(Norwegian Petroleum Directorate), Angeline Kneppers (Global CCS Institute), Manabu Tanashi 
(Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology), and Matthew Tanner 
(US Energy Information Agency). Douwe van Rees of De Ruijter Strategy BV facilitated the 
workshops with expertise and enthusiasm.  
From the IEA Secretariat, Wolf Heidug had overall responsibility for the work documented in this 
report, while Sean McCoy and Tsukasa Yoshimura contributed to various phases of the work. 
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Easy to change PDF original password; Options for setting PDF security level; PDF text Support adding and inserting hyperlink (link) to PDF document; Allow to
clickable pdf links; clickable links in pdf files
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Rotate PDF Page in C#.NET. Empower C# Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C# Programming Language in .NET Application
clickable links in pdf; add a link to a pdf in preview
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 6
Executive Summary 
To understand the emission reduction potential of carbon capture and storage (CCS), decision 
makers need to understand the amount of carbon dioxide (CO
2
) that can be safely stored in the 
subsurface and the geographical distribution of storage resources. Estimates of storage resources 
need to be made using reliable and consistent methods. This report offers recommendations for 
an internationally shared approach to quantifying this potential. 
Previous estimates of CO
2
 storage potential for a range of countries and regions have been based 
on a variety of methodologies, with access to widely differing amounts of data, resulting in a 
correspondingly wide range of capacity estimates. Some of these estimates have even been in 
conflict with others. Consequently, there has been uncertainty about which of the methodologies 
were most appropriate in given settings, and whether the estimates produced by these methods 
were useful to policy makers trying to determine the appropriate role for CCS. 
In 2011, the International Energy Agency (IEA) convened two workshops, which brought together 
experts from six national geological survey organisations to review geologic CO
2
 storage 
assessment methodologies and make recommendations on how to harmonise CO
2
 storage 
estimates worldwide.  
This workshop report presents the outcome of the workshops. It first gives an overview of factors 
to consider before undertaking a CO
2
 storage assessment on saline aquifers. This is followed by a 
comparison of ten of the more recently published CO
2
 storage resource assessment methods and 
resource estimates, which are characterised according to ten parameters and the results 
tabulated. 
The method comparison is then followed by a set of steps that can be used to assess geologic CO
2
 
resources. As the overall goal of the workshops was to harmonise CO
2
 storage estimates, the 
participants identified best practice in the form of steps that can be followed to conduct a 
thorough assessment of storage resource, throughout the world, across geologic settings, 
regardless of the amount of available geologic data.  
The following statements reflect the consensus of the workshop participants: 
 Strata within a basin should be subdivided into storage assessment units (SAUs). These are 
defined as mappable volumes of rock that consist of a porous flow storage unit and an 
overlying regional sealing formation. 
 Estimation methods should be probabilistic. The benefit of a probabilistic methodology is that 
it allows the resource to be assessed with any given level of uncertainty in the input data. 
 Pore volumes in SAUs should be estimated. 
 The application of any additional constraints should be clearly stated. 
 Methodologies should identify the total accessible storage resource (TASR), defined as the 
mass of CO
2
 that may be injected and stored using present‐day geologic and hydrologic 
knowledge of the subsurface and engineering practices. 
 Jurisdictions should use a common methodology to estimate storage efficiency factors, which 
are the fraction of available pore space that will be occupied by CO
2
 within an SAU. 
One of the most important points of agreement was that jurisdictions should assess and report 
the TASR  alongside  any other  estimates  that  are  subject  to further jurisdiction‐specific 
constraints. TASR estimates are solely determined by geological considerations, and thus country‐
level TASR estimates could be easily compared and aggregated. Following the approaches and 
procedures outlined in this report would ensure that jurisdictional CO
2
 storage resource 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 7 
assessments are comparable, thereby allowing decision makers to understand the distribution of 
global geologic CO
2
 storage resources.  
To further  support the  aim of  harmonising international storage  assessments, workshop 
participants agreed on the need: 
 to conduct further research into storage efficiency to develop robust and generically 
applicable calculation methods; and 
 to  enhance international  co‐operation between  organisations that have attempted or 
completed CO
2
 storage resource assessments and those that are looking to begin assessments. 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 8
Introduction 
To understand the emission reduction potential of carbon capture and storage (CCS), decision 
makers need to understand the size and distribution of carbon dioxide (CO
2
) storage resources. 
Prerequisites for this are a clear and widely shared definition of CO
2
 storage potential and an 
agreed method for its calculation. 
In 2011, the International Energy Agency (IEA) invited experts from the geological surveys of 
Australia, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States to two 
seminars to explore ways to improve the consistency of geologic storage resource estimates, and 
develop a shared understanding of what constitutes a resource estimate. This report presents the 
outcomes of the two seminars.  
The objective of the first seminar, entitled “CO
2
 Storage Capacity Estimation: Towards a Common 
Framework”, was to review and compare assessment frameworks currently used by different IEA 
member countries. As part of this, participants compared ten of the more recently published CO
2
 
storage resource assessments to understand: 
 common aspects of the methods; 
 differences in the underlying geological assumptions and methods used; and 
 policy constraints on the areas and rock volumes they cover, i.e. what sections of the total 
resource of pore space in a jurisdiction are considered in a particular assessment and why.  
These insights provided input to the second seminar, “CO
2
 Storage Capacity Estimation: 
Developing Guidelines”, in which participants considered best practice for storage resource 
assessment  and  suggested    ways    in    which  storage    assessment    methodologies  could  be 
harmonised. 
The workshops focused on methods used to estimate the storage capacity in saline water‐bearing 
parts of reservoir rocks, which are widely described in the CO
2
 storage literature by the shorthand 
term “saline aquifers” (e.g. Benson and Cook, 2005), as that is where the majority of the 
technically accessible CO
2
 storage potential resides (Benson and Cook, 2005; Bradshaw et al., 
2007).  
This report first outlines key considerations in the estimation of a storage resource, contrasting 
estimation approaches used today, and then proceeds to present the participants’ shared view of 
best practice for storage resource estimation. The information in the report is intended to 
support  future  national  or  regional‐scale  storage  assessments,  to  produce  robust  and 
internationally meaningful results. 
The implementation of the recommendations from the workshops, which are a consensus of the 
participating experts, would ensure that jurisdictional or national‐scale CO
2
 storage resource 
assessments could be comparable with each other and would provide a meaningful estimate of 
the global geologic CO
2
 storage resource. 
Background 
The last two decades have seen a proliferation of proposed classification schemes for CO
2
 storage 
potential and methods to estimate CO
2
 storage resources, with none being uniformly adopted 
around the world. These methods have been used to make estimates of storage potential that, in 
some cases, conflict with each other, despite being of similar vintages and covering comparable 
areas. For example, some estimates of potential for individual countries or regions were larger 
than those for the entire world (Benson and Cook, 2005; Bradshaw et al., 2007). Consequently, 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 9 
there remains uncertainty about what different methods to estimate potential are actually 
measuring, which methods are most appropriate in given settings, and whether the estimates 
produced by these methods provide a sound basis for policy making. 
Several organisations independently saw a need to develop classification systems that clearly 
differentiate between measures of storage potential, and methods to estimate storage resources 
(i.e. the largest, most inclusive measure of storage potential). These organisations included the 
Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) (Bachu et al., 2007; Bradshaw et al., 2007), the US 
Department of Energy (US DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) (2008), and the 
IEAGHG Programme (IEAGHG, 2009). In particular, the CSLF and US DOE proposed methods for 
CO
2
 storage resource assessments that could be applied in any jurisdiction given certain minimum 
levels of data availability. Comparisons (Bachu, 2008; Gorecki et al., 2009) of the CSLF and US DOE 
methodologies found that  these two methodologies  were basically  identical, with minor 
differences in computational formulation. 
Since the publication of the CSLF and US DOE methods, several other organisations have 
published and applied methods for determining geologic CO
2
 storage potential. A review of six 
CO
2
 storage atlases for different countries and regions indicates that there are significant 
differences between the six methods and the way in which they have been applied (Prelicz, 
Mackie and Otto, 2012). The storage estimates are not all based on the same scientific 
assumptions and thus cannot be accurately compared or summed to provide regional or global 
estimates of CO
2
 storage potential. Moreover, the estimates generally do not cover the entire 
technically accessible CO
2
 storage resource, because a range of local policy constraints have been 
applied to them, to make them relevant to a particular jurisdiction (Prelicz, Mackie and Otto, 
2012). It is these discrepancies that this report seeks to begin to address. 
 
 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 10
Defining geologic CO
2
 storage resources and 
assessment types 
Classification of CCS capacity 
As in other industries (e.g. oil and gas), CO
2
 storage classification schemes delineate between 
estimates of resources and reserves (or, in the case of CO
2
 storage, capacity) on the basis of 
technology, cost and certainty. A resource can be described as anything useful and potentially 
available to mankind that can be exploited with available technology; however, the presence of a 
resource does not imply that any part of it can be exploited economically now or in the future. 
The portion of a geologic resource that has economic value now, and is thus a commodity, is 
referred to as a “reserve”, whereas resource estimates that take into account economic factors 
are typically referred to as contingent resources. 
A geologic CO
2
 storage resource comprises pore space that can safely and permanently hold CO
2
Therefore the geologic formation must have properties that allow CO
2
 to be injected and, once 
injected, retained through one or more trapping mechanisms. Four trapping mechanisms are 
generally recognised (Benson and Cook , 2005; Bradshaw et al., 2007):  
 buoyant (also referred to as structural and stratigraphic); 
 residual; 
 solubility; and  
 mineral.  
While all four mechanisms play an important role in ensuring that CO
2
 is retained over long time 
scales, given anticipated injection rates and current technology, the most relevant trapping 
mechanisms for resource assessments are residual and buoyant trapping. Residual CO
2
 trapping is 
defined as “Discrete droplets, blobs, or ganglia of CO
2
 as a nonwetting phase, essentially 
immiscible with the wetting fluid, trapped within individual pores [or group of pores] where the 
capillary forces overcome the buoyant forces” (Brennan et al., 2010). Buoyant CO
2
 trapping is 
defined as “CO
2
 in communication across pore space creating a column that is held in place by a 
top and lateral seal, either a seal formation or a sealing fault” (Brennan et al., 2010). This 
document only covers assessments of buoyant and residual trapping mechanisms. 
Constraints on CCS capacity 
Any geologic CO
2
 storage resource assessment estimate is based on the mass of CO
2
 that can be 
stored within the pore space of subsurface rocks. However, the differences between classes of 
resource estimate, and indeed, the disparity among estimates of any single class, are the result of 
constraints placed on what constitutes “available” pore space. Assessments of subsurface CO
2
 
storage potential are constrained by: 
 geology and our understanding of the subsurface (e.g. geologic data and models); 
 engineering considerations (i.e. technologies available to exploit the available pore space and 
our ability to implement them); 
 economics (e.g. storage resources that are infinitely expensive to access are not useful); and, 
 socio‐political factors (e.g. acceptance of use of the subsurface for CO
2
 storage, or regulatory 
limitations on the use of certain technologies). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested