view pdf winform c# : Change link in pdf file SDK Library service wpf asp.net winforms dnn workshop_report_methodstoassessgeologicCO2storagecapacity1-part1440

© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 11 
The advantages of probabilistic assessments 
Our  limited  understanding  of  the  subsurface  and  its  inherent  variability  can  be  addressed  by 
gathering more geologic data and the use of probabilistic methods to quantify uncertainty. Given 
that  gathering  more  data  is  not  always  feasible  and  may  not  necessarily  reduce  variability, 
workshop participants  focused on probabilistic methods.  Probabilistic methods  use a  range  of 
geologic values, based on available data and a geologic model. Probabilistic resource assessment 
requires careful integration  of a geologic model of  the resource with the statistical analyses of 
results (Ahlbrandt and Klett, 2005; Charpentier and Klett, 2005). 
Because rocks are heterogeneous, data sets for large areas are rarely complete. Storage capacity 
estimates thus need to rely on geological models to fill gaps in the data.  Uncertainties could be 
addressed by generating a large number of Monte Carlo simulations with input parameters that 
are  statistically distributed in  accordance  with  the  geological model. The statistical analysis  of 
results can provide resource estimates at differing confidence intervals or fractiles. 
Probabilistic  methods  traditionally  provide  a  statistically  sound  method  to  make  resource 
approximations  (Ahlbrandt  and  Klett,  2005;  Charpentier  and  Klett,  2005).  The  benefit  of  a 
probabilistic methodology is that it allows for the resource to be assessed with any given level of 
uncertainty in the input data. If the basin or basins  within a jurisdiction  are mature petroleum 
provinces, then there will likely be abundant well data that can be used for the assessment. By 
contrast,  if  the  data  are  sparse,  then  there  will  need  to  be  some  geologic  interpretation  to 
estimate the input parameters. And if there are no data, then an analogue must be used. All data 
density  scenarios,  however,  require  the establishment  of  a  geologic  model  that  describes  the 
basin’s depositional, burial, diagenetic and structural history. The geologic uncertainty increases 
as the amount  of data  decreases; the  resource estimates  will reflect the  geologic  uncertainty. 
Therefore the range of possible storage  assessment resource values will widen  with increasing 
geologic uncertainty. Regardless of the output of the probabilistic models, the ranges of resource 
estimates still hold significant value as a prospective tool and for adding to the understanding of 
the global CO
2
 storage endowment.  
Engineering, economic and socio‐political constraints 
Engineering, economic and socio‐political constraints can be applied to the input values used for 
the initial estimation (upstream) or to output values based on how much of that pore space will 
be made available for CO
2
 storage (downstream). They are informed by scientific, technological or 
economic  factors,  and  may  often  be  imposed  by  government  policy;  the  minimum  depth 
requirements in many methodologies are one such example. Therefore, before a jurisdiction or 
organisation attempts to estimate the geologic CO
2
 storage resource of any particular area, they 
need to determine the constraints that will be involved in their estimates and how they will be 
applied. 
Upstream constraints  limit the  amount of pore  space available  for  storage.  Depending  on  the 
jurisdiction, these constraints could limit pore space to: 
 storage formations overlain by a sealing formation;  
 off‐shore storage;  
 petroleum‐bearing strata;  
 a certain distance from point sources of CO
2
 emissions;  
 stratigraphic or structural closures where CO
2
 will be trapped as an immobile column; 
 reservoirs associated with enhanced oil recovery; or 
 depth at which CO
2
 exists as a dense liquid or supercritical fluid. 
Change link in pdf file - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add a link to a pdf file; clickable links in pdf from word
Change link in pdf file - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding hyperlinks to pdf files; add url pdf
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 12
Examples of downstream constraints are:  
 assumptions about whether reservoir pressure control is practical (in essence this is an 
economic constraint); and 
 the minimum total  dissolved solids (TDS) values of  groundwater  in potential storage 
formations, to protect underground drinking water resources.  
Several factors come into play when determining the goal of an assessment, and ultimately the 
assessment geologist must decide what constraints to apply before choosing or developing their 
own geologic CO
2
 storage assessment methodology. 
Storage efficiency  
A key component necessary to estimate CO
2
 storage is typically referred to as storage efficiency. 
The storage efficiency represents the fraction of accessible pore volume that will be occupied by 
free‐phase CO
2
. The time at which storage efficiency is evaluated affects its value. For example, 
Gorecki  et  al.  (2009)  performed  a  comprehensive  study  on  storage efficiency  as a  function of 
lithology,  describing  a  model  that  estimated  the  efficiency  based  on  the  time  at  which  CO
2
 
injection stopped, but the CO
2
 plume was still mobile. Szulczewski et al. (2012) issued a method 
to estimate efficiency numerically in two scenarios: (1) migration‐limited efficiency factor, which 
expresses  the  amount  of  CO
2
 that  can  be  injected  such  that  it  all  becomes  sequestered  by 
residual trapping and solubility trapping before reaching the boundary of  the  aquifer;  and, (2) 
pressure‐limited efficiency factor, which expresses the amount of CO
2
 that can be injected over a 
given time period without fracturing the seal. The type of trapping influences the magnitude of 
storage efficiency, with buoyant trapping being the most efficient.  
There  is  considerable  uncertainty  over  what  storage  efficiency  factor  should  be  used  in 
assessment  methodologies.  Current  analytical  techniques  for  estimating the  storage  efficiency 
(Juanes, MacMinn and Szulczewski, 2010; Okwen, Stewart and Cunningham, 2010) allow for the 
storage efficiency of an entire geological unit to be estimated given temperature  and pressure 
gradients, depth ranges, estimates of the irreducible water saturation at  the  leading edge of a 
mobile CO
2
 plume, the residual gas saturation at the trailing edge of the plume, and the relative 
permeability  between  the  CO
2
 and  the  ground  water.  These  estimates  come  primarily  from 
experimental data (e.g., Bennion and Bachu, 2005, 2008; Burton, Kumar and Bryant, 2008; Okabe 
and Tsuchiya, 2008; Okabe et al., 2010; Akbarabadi and Piri, 2013). 
The controls on storage efficiency are:  
 the volume of rock contacted by the CO
2
 plume, also known as the sweep efficiency; 
 how easily CO
2
 will move relative to the water present within the pore space, also known as 
relative permeability; 
 the amount of water that will be displaced by the leading edge of the CO
2
 plume, also known 
as drainage; 
 how much water re‐enters the pore space at the trailing edge of the CO
2
 plume, also known as 
imbibition; 
 a ratio of the viscosity of the CO
2
 to the viscosity of the water, which estimates how much 
water can be displaced by the lower viscosity CO
2
 a ratio of the density of the CO
2
 to  the  density  of  the  water,  to determine  the  control  of 
gravity forces, or buoyancy, on how the CO
2
 plume moves, and the shape of that plume from 
the injection well through the storage formation; and 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
list below is mainly to optimize PDF file with multiple Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing 150.0F 'to change image compression
add hyperlinks to pdf; check links in pdf
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
list below is mainly to optimize PDF file with multiple Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing 150F; // to change image compression
active links in pdf; add links to pdf online
© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 13 
 whether any pressure management methods will be allowed during CO
2
 injection – the lack of 
pressure  management  might  significantly  reduce  the  storage efficiency  values  (Zhou  et al., 
2008). 
Further  research  into  storage  efficiency  factors  would  be  extremely  beneficial  to  the 
development of a more robust and generically applicable set of storage efficiency factors. 
 
 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Dim setting As PasswordSetting = New PasswordSetting(newUserPassword, newOwnerPassword) ' Change password for an encrypted PDF file and output to a new file.
add links to pdf; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
PasswordSetting setting = new PasswordSetting(newUserPassword, newOwnerPassword); // Change password for an encrypted PDF file and output to a new file.
add links in pdf; adding hyperlinks to pdf
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 14
Overview of current CO
2
 resource assessment 
methodologies 
The methodologies used in the following ten CO
2
 storage potential assessments were compared: 
 United Kingdom CO
2
 Storage Appraisal Project (Gammer et al., 2011); 
 United States Geological Survey (USGS) (Brennan et al., 2010, Blondes et al., 2013); 
 US DOE – The United States 2012 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas IV (US DOE NETL, 2012); 
 North American Carbon Atlas Partnership (NACAP, 2012); 
 Australian Carbon Storage Taskforce (Carbon Storage Taskforce, 2009); 
 Queensland CO
2
 Geological Storage Atlas (Bradshaw et al., 2009); 
 Saline‐aquifer CO
2
 Sequestration in Japan (Ogawa et al., 2011); 
 Geological Survey of the Netherlands (TNO) – Independent Storage Assessment of Offshore 
CO
2
 Storage Options for Rotterdam (Neele et al., 2011a, b; 2012); 
 Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), Germany – Recalculation of 
Potential Capacities for CO
2
 Storage in Deep Aquifers (Knopf et al., 2010); and 
 CO
2
 Storage Atlas: Norwegian Sea (Norwegian Petroleum Directorate, 2011). 
The comparison is summarised in Annex 1. The methodologies were compared according to a set 
of criteria, covered in Annex 1 in rows 1‐20. 
The type of assessment and the area  of jurisdiction  covered by the resource  assessments vary 
(row  1).  All  but  the  Queensland  CO
2
 Geological  Storage  Atlas  are  national‐level  resource 
assessments for onshore or offshore territory, or both.  
The geographical scale of the assessment ranges in the reviewed studies from the continental to 
state or province in extent (row 2). They all consider multiple sedimentary basins. The scale of the 
assessment can  be  important  because more  resources are  needed to  assess  larger  areas  at  a 
given level of detail. Thus the methodology applied to a continental or basin‐scale CO
2
 storage 
resource assessment is unlikely to be sufficiently detailed to determine the CO
2
 storage capacity 
of an individual structural trap at the project level. 
In all of the studies reviewed, the data are stored in a database and are displayed and queried 
using a geographic information system (GIS) (row 3). 
All  the  assessments  reviewed  consider  the  storage  potential  of  saline  water‐bearing  reservoir 
rocks  (saline  aquifers)  (row  4).  Most  (nine  out  of  ten)  also  consider  the  storage  potential  of 
hydrocarbon fields and four also consider the storage potential of coal seams. 
The  criteria  in  rows  5‐11 describe  the pore  volumes  that were considered  unsuitable for  CO
2
 
storage in  the  reviewed  assessments.  None of the  assessments reviewed  considers the  entire 
pore space in reservoir  rocks  within  the area that they cover, for  a range  of  technical, policy‐
driven and economic reasons. All the studies exclude: 
 pore space at shallow depth, where stored CO
2
 is not likely to be in the dense phase;
1
 and 
                                                                                
 
1
 The  minimum depth requirement is commonly  justified on  the  grounds  that (a)  the CO
2
 should be stored  in the dense 
(supercritical) phase, because storage density would be much greater than in the gas phase, and (b) because it is more likely to 
leak or interact with other uses of the subsurface (including the present or future use of potable groundwater resources) at 
shallower depths. The actual minimum depths quoted vary from 762 m to 914 m. 
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like
adding a link to a pdf in preview; adding hyperlinks to pdf documents
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Rotate PDF Page in C#.NET. Empower C# Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C# Programming Language in .NET Application
add page number to pdf hyperlink; add hyperlink in pdf
© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 15 
 pore space in inadequately sealed reservoir rocks. This is justified because although such rocks 
could  retain  a  residual  saturation  of  CO
2
,  creating  a  residual  saturation  of  significant  mass 
would cause significant volumes of CO
2
 to leak out of the reservoir. 
Of the eight studies that include onshore areas, the two US studies (USGS and US DOE) explicitly 
exclude pore space because of policy requirements to protect underground sources of drinking 
water.  One study  (Germany)  excludes  pore  space  outside  known  traps for buoyant fluids  (i.e. 
structural and stratigraphic traps). Two studies (United Kingdom and Germany) exclude a fraction 
of  the  available  pore  space  by  applying  minimum  storage  unit capacity  cutoffs.  Three studies 
(United Kingdom,  Queensland, and  the Netherlands) exclude pore space by applying  minimum 
permeability or injectivity cutoffs. The Norwegian study excludes pore space in the rock volume 
where  petroleum  may  have  migrated,  because  they  expect  that  petroleum  exploration  and 
production will continue on the Norwegian continental shelf for the foreseeable future. The UK 
study excludes onshore pore space and some remote areas offshore.  
The basis of  all CO
2
 storage  resource assessments reviewed  in Annex 1 is  a reservoir‐seal  pair 
(row 12), which is referred to as a Storage Assessment Unit (SAU) in the USGS assessment. An 
SAU is there defined as a mappable subsurface body of rock into which CO
2
 can be injected and 
trapped (Brennan et al., 2010; Blondes et al., 2013). 
Rows 13‐17 describe the methods used to estimate the CO
2
 storage resource. Row 13 indicates 
whether the assessments use probabilistic or deterministic methods. Four of the ten assessments 
use  probabilistic  methodologies  (USGS,  Australia,  Germany  and  United  Kingdom).  Row  14 
indicates that all assessments estimated CO
2
 density; however, different methods were employed 
to estimate those density values or ranges.  
Eight of the assessments (all except those of the Netherlands and United Kingdom) assume that 
reservoir  pressure  rise  does  not  limit  CO
2
 injection  (row  15).  These  eight  methods  assess 
resources that are technically available, as they do not take any economic factors into account in 
their  estimates.  In  cases  where  the  assumption  is  that  pressure  can  dissipate  through  the 
migration of fluids out of the SAU (e.g. due to a good hydraulic connection between the affected 
pore space  and  the seabed)  or  be  actively managed  through engineering  measures,  a storage 
efficiency factor is applied to the pore volume of the assessment unit to derive the volume of CO
2
 
that could be stored in the SAU. The storage resource is then obtained by multiplying the stored 
volume of CO
2
 by the density of CO
2
 at the estimated storage temperature and pressure. 
Although the equations used in the various assessments differ in minor respects (Prelicz, Mackie 
and Otto, 2012; Goodman et al., 2013), the main differences between the assessments, which are 
based on the assumption that pressure can be managed, are in the storage efficiency factors that 
are  applied.  Understanding and calculating storage efficiencies where pressure management  is 
allowed  is  a  subject  where further  research  would  be  advantageous  and  would  likely  lead  to 
further harmonisation. 
In cases where the assumption is that pore fluid pressure in the reservoir cannot be managed by 
withdrawal  of  reservoir  fluids  or  by  migration  of  reservoir  fluids  out  of  the  SAU,  pressure  is 
considered to be the factor that limits storage capacity. Details are provided in rows 16‐17. For 
example,  the  Netherlands  and  UK  studies  assume  that  pressure  management  (by  producing 
reservoir fluids from wells) will not be used. This assumption is made because of the perception 
that pressure management is costly. Accordingly, they estimate the contingent storage resource, 
which is a resource estimate limited by economic considerations. The storage potential of a few 
of the UK  units  of assessment are  estimated on  the basis that  they are well connected to the 
seabed and thus pressure build‐up in the reservoir will naturally dissipate into the sea over the 
typical  lifetime  of  an  injection  project  (i.e.  reservoir  pressure  build‐up  will  equilibrate  during 
injection). 
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Easy to change PDF original password; Options for setting PDF security PDF Hyperlink Edit. Support adding and inserting hyperlink (link) to PDF document; Allow to
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; add link to pdf file
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# File
add hyperlink to pdf in; add hyperlinks to pdf online
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 16
Row 18 describes the way in which geological uncertainty (sometimes described as geological risk 
or the level of confidence in the resource in a particular SAU) is treated in each assessment. The 
treatment of uncertainty varies considerably in these assessment methods.  
Rows 19 and 20 describe the method for storage resource assessment in hydrocarbon fields. In 
the  majority  of  assessments  that  include  the  storage  resource  in  hydrocarbon  fields,  it  was 
assumed that all or part of the hydrocarbon fluids that have been removed from the field could 
be replaced with CO
2
. In one method (the Netherlands) the pressure capacity of the total affected 
space is used. Row 20 indicates if the method is deterministic or probabilistic. 
Significance of the differences between the assessment 
methodologies 
Methodological differences 
The main difference between the assessment methodologies is whether there is  an underlying 
assumption  that  pressure  management  techniques  can  be  used.  In  a  purely  technical  sense, 
reservoir pressure can be managed through the production of reservoir fluids from the storage 
reservoir,  though  this  may  occur  at  significant  cost.  Therefore  methodologies  in  which  it  is 
assumed that pressure can be managed are closer to a technical resource assessment than those 
in which it is assumed that pressure cannot be managed. The former are constrained by what is 
technically  possible  (regardless  of  current  cost),  whereas  the  latter  are  contingent  upon  the 
(potentially prohibitive) cost of pressure management. 
Assessments  in  which  it  is  assumed  that  pressure  can  be  managed  result  in  larger  storage 
potentials  than  those  in  which  it  is  assumed  that  pressure  cannot  be  managed,  because  the 
storage efficiency factors used are typically larger than the pressure‐limited storage efficiencies 
derived in the latter.  
Storage efficiency factors 
The  various  assessments  by  and  large  attach  different  meaning  to  the  concept  of  storage 
efficiency and, in cases where a similar meaning is assumed, use different methods to estimate 
storage efficiency.  Comparing the  storage resource estimates  from  the various assessments  is 
therefore difficult,  and  leads  to  the wide  range of  values mentioned earlier in  this document. 
Therefore, a consistent definition and method for estimating storage efficiency is needed. 
Policy constraints 
Policy  constraints,  applied  in  all  the  methodologies,  can  significantly  reduce  the  pore  volume 
considered in the assessment compared to the total pore volume in the jurisdiction. This is not 
necessarily a disadvantage for policy makers, because the net result is a realistic assessment of 
the available resource in each jurisdiction studied. The policy constraints applied  in each study 
are shown in Annex 1 in row  1, “Type of  assessment  and area covered”, and  rows 5‐11 “Pore 
volumes considered unsuitable for CO
2
 storage”. 
Grouping of CO
2
 storage assessment methodologies 
Most of the existing assessment methodologies produce estimates of CO
2
 storage resources that 
fall naturally into one of four groups: 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 17 
1.  technically accessible storage resources; 
2.  the storage resource in structural or stratigraphic traps; 
3.  the contingent storage resource assuming pressure management wells will not be used; or 
4.  the  contingent  storage  resource  in  subsurface  volumes  where  CO
2
 storage  will  not  affect 
hydrocarbon production or exploration. 
Individual  assessments  within  any  one of these  groups  may  vary  slightly, either  due  to  policy 
constraints  or  the  methodologies  employed.  Nonetheless,  from  a  policy  maker’s  perspective, 
their results are broadly comparable. Table 1 shows how the resources from each of the reviewed 
methodologies fit into these various categories. 
Table 1 • Categorisation of reviewed storage resource assessment methodologies 
Name of 
assessment 
Technically 
accessible storage 
resource 
assessment 
The resource in 
structural or 
stratigraphic traps 
The resource 
assuming pressure 
management wells 
will not be used 
The resource in 
subsurface volumes 
where CO
2
storage 
will not affect 
hydrocarbon 
production or 
exploration 
UK CO
2
Storage 
Appraisal Project  
• 
• 
USGS 
• 
• 
US DOE Carbon 
Utilization and 
Storage Atlas 
• 
North American 
Carbon Atlas 
Partnership 
• 
Australian Carbon 
Storage Taskforce 
• 
Queensland CO
Geological Storage 
Atlas 
• 
Japan – Saline-
Aquifer CO
2
Sequestration 
• 
TNO – Offshore CO
2
Storage Options for 
Rotterdam 
• 
BGR – CO
2
Storage 
Potential in Deep 
Aquifers 
• 
Norwegian CO
2
Storage Atlas 
• 
 
 
 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 18
Guidelines for CO
2
 storage assessment methods 
A key goal of international collaboration on storage assessment methods is to create a uniform 
and coherent process that would facilitate the comparison of storage assessment results between 
countries.  Given  that  subsurface  storage  space  is  finite,  and  so  represents  a  scarce  natural 
resource, this initiative raises issues that are similar to the ones encountered with the assessment 
and  categorisation  of  subsurface  hydrocarbon  resources  (IEA,  2013).  Since  society  and  policy 
makers  can  make  choices  that  limit  (or  expand)  the  amount  of  storage  resource  that  will  be 
accessed, the fundamental question that must first be answered is: how much storage resource is 
there in total? The answer to this question is the technically available storage resource (TASR) in a 
country.  TASR comprises the pore space that  can be reasonably expected to retain CO
2
 over a 
long period of time without adverse environmental impact; in this sense it represents an “upper 
limit”. Since the TASR is not constrained by economic or policy considerations, it can be used to 
gain a better understanding of the trade‐offs that are often made when developing policies to 
control access  to resources.  Furthermore,  the  TASR  allows  comparison of  the  endowments  of 
countries with storage space.  
For  these reasons, the initial assessment of a country’s  endowment with storage space should 
aim to quantify its TASR. In line with this objective, this section discusses first the guidance for 
assessing TASR provided by the USGS. After an initial assessment of the TASR using this approach, 
a  further,  more  focused  assessment  can  be  performed  to  reflect  country‐specific  policy 
requirements.  In  this  document,  examples  of  such  focused  assessments  are illustrated  by  the 
German (BGR) and the Dutch (TNO) methodologies. Further detail on these USGS, BGR and TNO 
methodologies can be found in Annex 2. 
Conducting TASR assessments 
A  TASR assessment provides  an  evaluation of all the accessible storage resource, regardless  of 
non‐technical (e.g. economic, political) constraints. The guidance for assessing TASR provided by 
the USGS (Brennan  et  al.  2010, Blondes et al. 2013) represents a comprehensive and versatile 
assessment    framework  that  could  be  applied  globally.  It  is  based  on  four  steps  that  can  be 
applied to all assessments. 
Step 1 – Subdivision into geological units of assessment 
The basis of geologic CO
2
 storage resource assessments is characterisation of the subsurface. All 
the studies considered here use reservoir and seal pairs as their units of assessment.  In general it 
is advantageous to break down the assessment into ‘storage assessment units’ (SAUs)  each of 
which comprises a mappable subsurface body of rock into which CO
2
 can be injected and trapped, 
and  which is  overlain by  a regional  sealing formation (Brennan  et  al., 2010). This  regional seal 
formation is needed  to retard the upward migration of a mobile  CO
2
 plume,  and ensures that 
buoyant and residual trapping can be maximised in  the storage formation. Therefore, SAUs do 
not include either those parts of storage formations that are technically unsuitable or inaccessible 
for  the injection  or trapping  of CO
2
,  and  might not  include  technically  suitable  and  accessible 
portions  of  the  storage  formations  due  to  policy  requirements.  In  some  cases  an  SAU  might 
consist of  a series of stacked geological reservoir formations (or parts thereof) and their single 
overlying seal. The advantages of breaking down the assessment into SAUs are:  
 each SAU is spatially limited (and thus can be included in a GIS); 
 detailed assessments and reports can be compiled for individual SAUs; and 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 19 
 SAUs are treated individually in a potential aggregation step. 
Step 2 – Estimation of the total volume of accessible pore space in each 
SAU using probabilistic methods 
The  total  volume  of  accessible  pore  space  in  each  SAU  is  needed  so  that  a  range  of  storage 
efficiencies can be applied. The recommendation of the IEA workshops is that this total volume of 
pore space in each SAU is estimated in all new assessments.  
Because geologic properties are inherently heterogeneous and data are typically sparse and have 
associated errors, probabilistic methods are best at considering these limitations and capturing 
the uncertainty  in the  assessment  results.  Therefore,  ranges  for  all input  estimates should  be 
used  rather  than  fixed  values.  These  ranges,  and  the  extent  of  the  ranges,  provide  the  data 
distribution,  with  some  assumptions  made about  the  shape  of  that data  distribution  (normal, 
logarithmic, Beta, PERT, etc.) (Olea, 2011).  
Step 3 – Use consistent storage efficiency ranges 
To generate repeatable CO
2
 storage assessment results, a consistent method to estimate storage 
efficiency ranges is recommended. The USGS methodology splits storage estimates into buoyant 
and residual trapping (Brennan et al., 2010), and documents unique storage efficiencies for both 
types of storage (Blondes et al., 2013).  
For  calculating residual  storage efficiency, the  USGS method    uses  the  approach  suggested by 
MacMinn, Szulczewski  and  Juanes (2010), which quantifies  the  residual storage  efficiency of  a 
sloping reservoir (interface of storage formation and sealing formation is not horizontal) using an 
equation that employs the capillary trapping number divided by an approximation involving the 
mobility factor. The capillary trapping  number explains how much CO
2
 will be trapped and the 
mobility factor describes how much of the pore space the CO
2
 will enter. A brief description of 
the equations is  given in  Annex  3;  they  are  explained in  much  further  detail  in  Blondes  et al. 
(2013), with explanations as to how to determine the storage efficiency of any SAU. 
Within geologic closures,  where  CO
2
 will be kept in place by relatively impermeable  rocks, the 
storage efficiencies can be much higher. In the case of CO
2
 within a closure, the primary trapping 
type is buoyant trapping. Though some residual trapping will occur within the closure, residually 
trapped  CO
2
 is  a  minor  constituent.  Buoyant  storage  efficiency  is  controlled  primarily  by  the 
mobility factor and the irreducible water fraction,  without  taking into account the residual gas 
saturation since the CO
2
 would be held in place by a trap. For example, the USGS has assumed a 
buoyant storage efficiency of one minus the irreducible water fraction, less an estimate  of the 
mobility factor, resulting in buoyant storage efficiency values of 20%, 30%, and 40% (minimum, 
most likely,  maximum) (Blondes et al., 2013). These buoyant storage efficiency values, like the 
residual efficiency estimation method above, assume that pressure management will be allowed. 
Step 4 – Convert the volume of CO
2
 to a mass of CO
2
 
The TASR is defined as the mass of CO
2
 that can be stored in the pore volume of the SAU, while 
taking  into  account  present‐day  geologic  knowledge  and  engineering  practice  and  experience 
(Blondes  et  al.,  2013;  Brennan  et  al.,  2010).  Therefore,  the  unit  volume  of  CO
2
 storage,  as 
determined by steps 2 and 3, must be converted to a unit mass by estimating the density of CO
2
 
within the SAU. The CO
2
 density can be determined for the thermal and pressure ranges present 
across the SAU on the basis of a suitable equation of state (Blondes et al., 2013). 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 20
Methods to estimate subsets of the TASR 
In many jurisdictions there will  be specific  constraints on  the amount of the  TASR that will be 
available  for  CO
2
  storage.  For  example,  in  the  United  States,  water  that  has  less  than 
10 000 milligrams  per  litre  (mg/L)  of  TDS  is  protected  as  a  potential  source  of  underground 
drinking  water;  no fluid injection is allowed  in rocks  that contain low salinity groundwater (US 
EPA,  2009;  2010).  Therefore,  the  USGS  methodology  excludes  capacity  in  parts  of  an  SAU 
containing water with a salinity equal to or less than 10 000 mg/L TDS.  
Depending on the policy constraints of a given jurisdiction, it is possible that application of other 
constraints would provide policy makers with storage resource assessment values that assess the 
contingent fraction of the TASR available for storage. One such constraint might be on the type of 
trapping allowed; if only buoyant trapping is acceptable, then a methodology that focuses only on 
buoyant  trapping  would  be  expedient.  An  example  of  only  assessing  buoyant  trapping  is  the 
methodology developed by BGR to assess the storage potential in Germany (Knopf et al., 2010). 
Another common constraint is excluding the application of pressure management during storage, 
which  limits  injection of CO
2
 beyond  pressure maxima.  One  such  method  for  pressure‐limited 
storage assessment is the methodology used by TNO for assessing the storage potential in the 
Netherlands (Neele et al., 2011a). Both methodologies are characterised below. 
Recommended steps for buoyant‐limited storage assessment  
Follow all the steps for TASR assessments, and then follow these subsequent steps: 
Step 5 ‐ Identify closure type 
The  types of closures need to be defined, e.g. as stratigraphic, structural, or a combination of 
both. Stratigraphic  traps involve  the  way  in  which  the rocks  were  initially deposited,  whereas 
structural traps are the result of folding or faulting of the rocks post‐depositionally. Stratigraphic 
traps  will  not  show  up  on  structural  maps, and are more difficult to  find and predict  in  areas 
where undiscovered traps might occur. If possible, spill points should be identified or estimated. 
Spill points are the locations on the margins of a trap where a buoyant fluid will migrate out of 
the trap; spill point depths are the maximum fill depths for a trap.  
Step 6 ‐ Identify geologic models for existing traps 
Geologic  closures  are  caused  by  a  variety  of  factors,  involving    stratigraphic    relationships 
between rock deposits, burial history, structural history and diagenetic history. These factors will 
lead to a set of closures that can be described with similar geologic models. These models can be 
used to consolidate petrophysical data into groups, which can then provide ranges for estimating 
distributions of area,  thickness, porosity  and  permeability  for that specific closure  type.  These 
distributions can then be used as inputs into probabilistic assessment methodologies.  
Step 7 ‐ Use geologic models as analogues 
The geologic models created in step 6 can then be used as analogues for assessing formations or 
basins with little to no data. These analogues can help to identify promising storage potential in 
formations or basins that do not have hydrocarbon production. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested