view pdf winform c# : Add a link to a pdf file Library software class asp.net windows html ajax workshop_report_methodstoassessgeologicCO2storagecapacity2-part1441

© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 21 
Recommended steps for pressure‐limited CO
2
 storage 
assessments  
If no pressure management is allowed, follow the same steps as in the TASR methodology, and 
then follow these subsequent steps: 
Step 5– Determine present pore pressure  
The  present  pressure  of  the  injection  site  or  formation  can  be  determined  from  well 
measurements or from modelling. 
Step 6 – Identify injection rate to stay below maximum allowable pressure 
increase 
The  requirement  to limit  the  increase in  pressure  above  its  present  value  to  remain  below  a 
specified maximum allowable value imposes constraints on the CO
2
 injection rate. The injection 
rate controls how quickly CO
2
 enters the formation from the well, how the plume migrates in the 
formation, and how the pressure front propagates. 
Step 7 – Identify extent and depth of the pressure front 
The extent and depth of the pressure front should be identified based on the injection rate, to 
keep  within  jurisdictional  limits.  Through  engineering  practices,  the  CO
2
 plume  migration  is 
typically expected to stay within regions of the storage formations where the CO
2
 will remain in 
the supercritical state. However, there is no  similar limitation on the propagation limit for the 
pressure front. The controls on where the pressure front limits are will be up to the jurisdiction. 
But the injection rate and the geologic model for the storage formation will help determine how 
far the pressure front will be in front of the CO
2
 plume. 
Whichever assessment methodology is chosen,  it is important  that all constraints  are explicitly 
stated in order to facilitate comparisons of assessment between jurisdictions that are subject to 
contrasting restrictions.   
 
 
Add a link to a pdf file - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add url to pdf; pdf edit hyperlink
Add a link to a pdf file - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add links to pdf in acrobat; change link in pdf file
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 22
Looking Ahead 
This report is the first step of an international collaborative effort to compare national storage 
assessments,  and  ultimately  aggregate  them  into  a  worldwide  storage  estimate.  It  highlights 
several challenges that need to be met.  
On  a  technical  level,  there  is  a  need  to  identify  a  uniform  method  for  calculating  storage 
efficiency  ranges  and  how  that  method  might  be  used  for  future  assessments.  To  stimulate 
further discussion  on this issue the USGS sponsored a CO
2
 Storage  Efficiency  Workshop in July 
2012. Its results could form a basis for follow‐up work.  
There is also a need to enhance the co‐operation between organisations that have attempted or 
completed CO
2
 storage resource assessments and those that are looking to begin assessments. 
This co‐operation could be fostered via agreements between national organisations or through 
workshops or training by those with experience in assessing CO
2
 storage resource. The IEA may 
continue to facilitate this co‐operation. However, in order to have the best, up‐to‐date estimate 
of global CO
2
 storage resources, and the geographical distribution of those resources, some sort 
of formalised international co‐operation would be desirable.  
Conclusions 
This report reflects the consensus reached at two workshops organised by the IEA in 2011 and 
attended by the geological surveys of Australia, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, the United 
Kingdom,  and  the  United  States,  together  with  the  IEA.  At  these  workshops,  the  need  for  a 
common procedure was identified to allow for a transparent and robust assessment of geologic 
CO
2
 storage resource, throughout the world, across geologic settings, regardless of the amount of 
available geologic data.  
Participants agreed that the initial objective of any storage assessment should be to identify the 
total TASR available  for a country. Given that  estimates of TASR are essentially determined by 
geological considerations, and are not constrained by country‐specific policies regarding the use 
of  the  subsurface,  TASR  estimates  for  different  countries  or  jurisdictions  can  then  be  easily 
compared and aggregated. Therefore, TASR estimates from jurisdictions worldwide, following the 
approaches and procedures outlined in this report, would be of relevance for international policy 
making in relation to CCS. 
Also, to honour the political or economic constraints and regulations of jurisdictions, it would be 
helpful  to  have  estimates  of  contingent  resources.  Contingent  resources,  unlike  conventional 
resources, take these constraints into account. An aggregation of the contingent resources would 
also  be helpful  to  policy  makers  as  an  worldwide  estimate  of  the  total  storage  resource  that 
jurisdictions will allow to be used. This goal can be reached using the approach presented in this 
report as well. 
The general consensus of the workshop participants was the need for uniformity in the methods 
used  to  estimate  storage  efficiency  values.  The  storage  efficiency  estimates  are  the  major 
controlling and  uncertain variable in  determining  the storage  resources (Brennan  et al., 2010; 
Blondes et al., 2013). The methods described in this report can be a starting point for a uniform 
storage efficiency estimation method.  
The  workshop  participants  agreed  that  any  storage  assessment  method  should  seek  to  make 
estimates of  the  storage  resource that consider both the variability inherent  in the subsurface 
and uncertainty that results from our limited knowledge of the subsurface.  
 
 
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like
pdf hyperlinks; pdf hyperlink
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
adding links to pdf document; add a link to a pdf in acrobat
© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 23 
Annex 1: Comparison of CO
2
 storage capacity and 
resource assessment methodologies 
Table 2 • Comparison of CO
2
 storage capacity and resource assessment methodologies for the United 
Kingdom, the United States, North America and Australia 
UK CO
2
Storage 
Appraisal 
Project 
(Gammer et al., 
2011) 
USGS (Brennan 
et al. 2010, 
Blondes et al., 
2013) 
US DOE The 
United States 
2012 Carbon 
Utilization and 
Storage Atlas 
(US DOE NETL, 
2012) 
North American 
Carbon Atlas 
Partnership 
(NACAP, 2012) 
Australian 
Carbon Storage 
Taskforce 
(Carbon 
Storage 
Taskforce, 
2009) 
1. Type of 
assessment and 
area covered 
Offshore 
resource 
estimate for the 
United Kingdom 
National onshore 
resource 
estimate for the 
United States 
High-level 
inventory of 
onshore and 
offshore capacity 
in the United 
States and 
Canada 
High-level 
inventory of 
onshore and 
offshore capacity 
in Canada, the 
United States, 
and Mexico 
Top-down 
assessment of 
CO
2
storage 
resources in 
offshore and 
onshore 
Australia.
2. Scale of the 
assessment 
National 
National 
Continental 
Continental 
National 
3. How is 
underpinning 
data held and 
queried? 
Database and 
GIS 
Database and 
GIS 
Database and 
GIS 
Database and 
GIS 
Data utilised 
derived from 
national and 
state petroleum 
well databases. 
No GIS data 
base included 
with the report 
4. Classes of 
storage 
reservoirs 
assessed 
Saline aquifers, 
hydrocarbon 
fields 
Saline aquifers, 
hydrocarbon 
fields 
Saline aquifers, 
hydrocarbon 
fields, coal 
seams 
Saline aquifers, 
hydrocarbon 
fields, coal 
seams 
Saline aquifers, 
hydrocarbon 
fields 
Pore volumes considered unsuitable for CO
2
storage 
5. Pore volumes 
at shallow 
depths* 
Yes  
(cutoff 800
 
m) 
Yes  
(cutoff 914 m) 
Yes  
(cutoff 762 m) 
Yes  
(cutoff 800 m) 
Yes  
(cutoff 800m, 
implicit in good 
reservoir being 
between 800 m 
and 2 000 m) 
6. Pore space in 
inadequately 
sealed reservoir 
rocks 
Yes   
Yes   
Yes   
Yes.  
Sealing unit is 
explicit criterion 
for storage 
suitability 
Storage region 
defined by area 
of seal above 
reservoir  
7. Excludes pore 
volumes 
containing water 
with potable 
water** 
Not explicitly, but 
not relevant to an 
offshore 
assessment 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Not considered in 
assessing total 
volumes 
8. Pore volumes 
not in mapped 
buoyancy traps 
No 
No 
No 
No. Structural/ 
stratigraphic and 
residual gas 
trapping are all 
considered 
Based on saline 
aquifer storage 
not buoyancy 
trapping 
9. Minimum 
storage unit size 
cutoff 
Yes 
No 
No 
1 MtCO
2
No 
10. Minimum 
reservoir quality 
(porosity-
permeability) 
cutoff 
Yes 
No 
No 
No 
Not defined,  
P10 - P90 
distribution for 
each basin 
picked on 
permeability 
depth-plots 
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
pdf link to specific page; add email link to pdf
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
add hyperlink pdf; adding an email link to a pdf
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 24
UK CO
2
Storage 
Appraisal 
Project 
(Gammer et al., 
2011) 
USGS (Brennan 
et al. 2010, 
Blondes et al., 
2013) 
US DOE The 
United States 
2012 Carbon 
Utilization and 
Storage Atlas 
(US DOE NETL, 
2012) 
North American 
Carbon Atlas 
Partnership 
(NACAP, 2012) 
Australian 
Carbon Storage 
Taskforce 
(Carbon 
Storage 
Taskforce, 
2009) 
11. Pore volumes 
within an area of 
potential 
petroleum 
migration 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 
12. Unit(s) of 
assessment - 
definition 
Storage unit - a 
sealed saline 
water-bearing 
part of a 
reservoir 
formation that is 
suitable for CO
2
storage, 
Daughter unit - 
hydrocarbon field 
or mapped saline 
water-bearing 
trap within a 
storage unit 
Storage 
assessment unit 
- a mappable 
subsurface body 
of rock that 
consists of a 
porous flow 
storage unit into 
which CO
2
can 
be injected and 
trapped and a 
bounding 
regional sealing 
formation 
Saline 
formations, 
hydrocarbon 
fields, unminable 
coal beds 
Saline formation, 
hydrocarbon 
field, unminable 
coal 
Area of storage 
region 
Methods used to estimate CO
2
storage capacity in saline water-bearing reservoir rocks 
13. Probabilistic 
or deterministic 
estimate 
Probabilistic 
Probabilistic 
Deterministic  
Deterministic 
Probabilistic 
14. CO
2
density 
calculation for 
storage units 
Yes 
Yes, calculated 
for each basin 
based on 
pressure/temper
ature curves 
(Blondes et al., 
2013) 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes, triangular 
distribution 0.5-
0.6-0.7 tonne/m
3
15. Storage 
efficiency method 
(assumes 
capacity of some 
or all storage 
units not 
pressure-limited) 
Yes - for the 
minority of 
storage units with 
a good 
connection to 
other reservoirs 
or the seabed 
(so-called open 
units) 
Yes (Blondes et 
al., 2013) 
Yes 
Yes, E estimates 
of 1%-4% (2.4% 
average) based 
on Monte Carlo 
simulations by 
US DOE (2007) 
Yes - uniform 
storage efficiency 
factor of 4% used 
16. Pressure 
capacity method 
(assumes 
capacity of some 
or all aquifer 
storage 
assessment units 
pressure-limited) 
Yes - for the 
majority of 
storage units, 
which are not 
thought to have a 
good connection 
to other 
reservoirs or the 
seabed (so-
called closed 
units) 
No 
No 
Pressure must 
be less than 
some fraction of 
fracture pressure 
Not considered in 
assessing total 
volumes 
17. Treatment of 
pressure 
management 
Estimates CO
2
storage resource 
that is technically 
accessible 
without recourse 
to pressure 
management or 
chase water 
injection 
Estimates 
technically 
accessible CO
2
storage resource 
(TASR). 
Underlying 
assumption that 
pressure can be 
managed 
Unencumbered 
CO
2
storage 
capacities 
calculated on 
sub-regional 
(Partnership) 
basis. Underlying 
assumption that 
pressure can be 
managed 
Underlying 
assumption that 
pressure can be 
managed. 
Qualitative 
assessment of 
sedimentary 
basins; 
quantitative 
assessment of 
best potential 
basins subject to 
data availability. 
Unencumbered 
CO
2
storage 
capacities 
Qualitative 
assessment of 
sedimentary 
basins. 
Quantitative 
assessment of 
basins 
considered highly 
suitable or 
suitable 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Have a try with this sample C#.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file.
add hyperlink to pdf in preview; pdf link to attached file
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Have a try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file. ' Open a document.
add hyperlinks pdf file; add link to pdf acrobat
© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 25 
UK CO
2
Storage 
Appraisal 
Project 
(Gammer et al., 
2011) 
USGS (Brennan 
et al. 2010, 
Blondes et al., 
2013) 
US DOE The 
United States 
2012 Carbon 
Utilization and 
Storage Atlas 
(US DOE NETL, 
2012) 
North American 
Carbon Atlas 
Partnership 
(NACAP, 2012) 
Australian 
Carbon Storage 
Taskforce 
(Carbon 
Storage 
Taskforce, 
2009) 
calculated on 
regional basis. 
Confidence in 
capacity 
estimates to be 
specified using 
confidence 
matrix (US DOE, 
2007) 
18. Treatment of 
geological 
uncertainty 
Risk data 
collected for 
each assessment 
unit. Not 
convolved with 
resource 
estimate. Chance 
of success and 
economics of 
each storage unit 
assessed 
The probabilistic 
assessment of 
the potential 
storage resource 
in each 
assessment unit 
takes account of 
geological 
uncertainty 
Produces a high 
and low estimate 
of storage 
resource, mainly 
based on a high 
and low storage 
efficiency 
estimate 
Produces a high 
and low estimate 
of storage 
resource, mainly 
based on a high 
and low storage 
efficiency 
estimate 
The probabilistic 
assessment of 
the potential 
storage resource 
in each 
assessment unit 
takes account of 
geological 
uncertainty 
19. Assessment 
method for 
storage resource 
in hydrocarbon 
fields 
Calculation 
based on fluid 
replacement. 
Mass of CO
2
that 
could be stored = 
mass that 
occupies the 
reservoir volume 
of net fluids 
produced at 
initial pressure 
and temperature 
of hydrocarbon 
reservoir 
Hydrocarbon 
fields treated as 
potential 
buoyancy traps 
for CO
2
Minimum size of 
approximately 
50 000-60 000 
tonnes storage 
resource, based 
on a minimum 
reservoir size of 
0.5 million boe. 
Calculation 
based on fluid 
replacement. 
Mass of CO
2
that 
could be stored = 
mass that 
occupies the 
reservoir volume 
of the produced 
fluids at initial 
formation 
pressure or a 
pressure 
considered a 
maximum CO
2
storage pressure.
Calculation 
based on fluid 
replacement. 
Mass of CO
2
that 
could be stored = 
mass that 
occupies the 
reservoir volume 
of the produced 
fluids at initial 
formation 
pressure or a 
pressure 
considered a 
maximum CO
2
storage pressure.
Estimated by the 
Petroleum and 
Greenhouse Gas 
Advice Group of 
Geoscience 
Australia. 
Methodology not 
explicitly stated. 
Based on high-
level reserve 
estimates.
20. Probabilistic 
or deterministic 
estimate of 
hydrocarbon field 
storage potential 
Probabilistic 
Probabilistic 
Deterministic 
Deterministic 
Deterministic 
Notes: boe = barrel of oil equivalent; m = metre; m
3
 = cubic metre; MtCO
2
 = million tonnes of carbon dioxide. 
* Where the CO
2
 is not likely to be in dense phase. 
** Water with <10 000 ppm TDS. 
 
 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
add hyperlink pdf file; add links to pdf acrobat
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Add necessary references: using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Note: When you get the error "Could not load file or assembly 'RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic' or any other
add link to pdf; add links to pdf file
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 26
Table 3 • Comparison of CO
2
 storage capacity and resource assessment methodologies for Queensland, 
Japan, the Netherlands, Germany and Norway 
Queensland 
CO
2
Geological 
Storage Atlas 
(Bradshaw et al. 
2009) 
Japan 
Saline-Aquifer 
CO
2
Sequestration 
in Japan –
methodology of 
storage 
capacity 
assessment 
(Ogawa et al. 
2011) 
TNO 
Independent 
Storage 
Assessment of 
Offshore CO
2
Storage Options 
for Rotterdam 
(Neele et al., 
2011a, 2011b) 
BGR 
Recalculation of 
Potential 
Capacities for 
CO
2
Storage in 
Deep Aquifers 
(Knopf et al., 
2010) 
Norway 
CO
2
Storage 
Atlas: 
Norwegian Sea  
(Norwegian 
Petroleum 
Directorate, 
2011) 
1. Type of 
assessment and 
area covered 
Onshore 
resource 
assessment for 
Queensland 
(Australia) 
Onshore and 
offshore resource 
assessment for 
Japan 
Offshore 
resource 
assessment for 
the Netherlands 
Onshore and 
offshore resource 
assessment for 
Germany 
Offshore 
resource 
assessment for 
Norway 
2. Scale of the 
assessment 
State 
National 
National 
National 
National 
3. How is 
underpinning 
data held and 
queried? 
Database and 
GIS 
Data utilised 
derived from 
national 
petroleum well 
databases. No 
GIS data base 
included with the 
report 
Database and 
GIS 
GIS / 
spreadsheets 
Database and 
GIS 
4. Classes of 
storage 
reservoirs 
assessed 
Saline aquifers - 
hydrocarbon 
fields and coal 
seams as 
regional 
summaries 
Saline aquifers, 
hydrocarbon 
fields, coal 
seams 
Saline aquifers, 
hydrocarbon 
fields 
Saline aquifers, 
hydrocarbon 
fields (mainly 
natural gas, 
some oil fields) 
Saline aquifers, 
hydrocarbon 
fields 
Pore volumes considered unsuitable for CO
2
storage 
5. Pore volumes 
at shallow 
depths* 
Yes (cutoff 800 
m) 
Yes (cutoff 800 
m) 
Yes, CO
2
must 
be supercritical 
(800-1 000 m 
recommended) 
Yes (cutoff 800 
m) 
No 
6. Pore space in 
inadequately 
sealed reservoir 
rocks 
Storage region 
defined by area 
of seal above 
reservoir  
Yes, implied in 
description of 
suitability 
assessment 
Seal required 
where buoyant 
plume 
Yes 
Yes 
7. Excludes pore 
volumes 
containing water 
with potable 
water** 
Not considered in 
assessing total 
volumes 
Not considered in 
assessing total 
volumes 
Not considered in 
assessing total 
volumes 
Not explicitly; 
sweet water 
occurs usually at 
depths < 400 m 
below surface 
Not explicitly but 
not relevant to an 
offshore 
assessment 
8. Pore volumes 
not in mapped 
buoyancy traps 
Based on 
"migration 
assisted storage" 
not buoyancy 
traps 
No 
No 
Yes 
No 
9. Minimum 
storage unit size 
cutoff 
No 
Not stated 
No 
Various, 
depending on 
context of 
regional 
assessment 
No 
10. Minimum 
reservoir quality 
(porosity-
permeability) 
cutoff 
>5mD, >10% 
Not stated 
Yes (via 
injectivity 
criterion) 
No 
No 
11. Pore volumes 
within an area of 
potential 
petroleum 
migration 
No 
No 
No 
No 
Yes 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 27 
Queensland 
CO
2
Geological 
Storage Atlas 
(Bradshaw et al. 
2009) 
Japan 
Saline-Aquifer 
CO
2
Sequestration 
in Japan –
methodology of 
storage 
capacity 
assessment 
(Ogawa et al. 
2011) 
TNO 
Independent 
Storage 
Assessment of 
Offshore CO
2
Storage Options 
for Rotterdam 
(Neele et al., 
2011a, 2011b) 
BGR 
Recalculation of 
Potential 
Capacities for 
CO
2
Storage in 
Deep Aquifers 
(Knopf et al., 
2010) 
Norway 
CO
2
Storage 
Atlas: 
Norwegian Sea  
(Norwegian 
Petroleum 
Directorate, 
2011) 
12. Unit(s) of 
assessment - 
definition 
Potential storage 
area (maximum 
known extent of 
reservoir-seal 
intervals within a 
basin that are 
evaluated as 
having potential 
for geological 
storage) 
Sealed saline 
formations in 
geographical 
areas 
Affected space 
(total space 
affected by 
storage in a 
reservoir 
including the 
resulting 
pressure 
footprint) 
Reservoir rock 
units (e.g. Middle 
Bunter in the 
North German 
Basin) 
Geological 
formations (with 
reservoir 
potential and 
overlying seals) 
Methods used to estimate CO
2
storage capacity in saline water-bearing reservoir rocks 
13. Probabilistic 
or deterministic 
estimate 
Deterministic 
Deterministic 
Deterministic 
Probabilistic 
Deterministic 
14. CO
2
density 
calculation for 
storage units 
Yes, calculated 
for each basin 
based on 
pressure/temper
ature curves 
Yes (via CO
2
volume factor) 
Yes 
Yes but in some 
regional studies 
only 
Yes 
15. Storage 
efficiency method 
(assumes 
capacity of some 
or all storage 
units not 
pressure-limited) 
Storage 
efficiency based 
on reservoir 
thickness vs. 
plume thickness. 
High for thin 
reservoirs, low 
for thick, 
determined on a 
reservoir-by-
reservoir basis 
using 
precalculated 
RGS Storage 
Efficiency curves 
for various plume 
thicknesses 
Yes (described 
as storage factor) 
No 
Yes (distribution 
of storage 
efficiency factor 
between 5% and 
20% for Monte 
Carlo 
simulations) 
Yes 
16. Pressure 
capacity method 
(assumes 
capacity of some 
or all aquifer 
storage 
assessment units 
pressure-limited) 
Discussed, but 
not explicitly 
factored into 
calculations 
Not considered in 
assessing total 
volumes 
Yes 
No 
No 
17. Treatment of 
pressure 
management 
Technical 
resource 
estimate. 
Evaluates 
technical 
suitability of 
basins for 
storage. Risk of 
basin suitability 
included via 
simple risk matrix 
and score. 
Reliability of 
estimate for each 
storage area 
derived from a 
data quality 
assessment 
Technical 
resource 
estimate. 
Reliability of 
estimate for each 
storage area 
derived from a 
data quality 
assessment 
process 
Resource 
assumed to be 
limited by pore 
fluid pressure 
build-up fluid 
conductivity in 
the total affected 
space and 
injectivity. 
Reliability of data 
limits reliability of 
estimate so 
propose system 
for rating data 
quality 
No 
No 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 28
Queensland 
CO
2
Geological 
Storage Atlas 
(Bradshaw et al. 
2009) 
Japan 
Saline-Aquifer 
CO
2
Sequestration 
in Japan –
methodology of 
storage 
capacity 
assessment 
(Ogawa et al. 
2011) 
TNO 
Independent 
Storage 
Assessment of 
Offshore CO
2
Storage Options 
for Rotterdam 
(Neele et al., 
2011a, 2011b) 
BGR 
Recalculation of 
Potential 
Capacities for 
CO
2
Storage in 
Deep Aquifers 
(Knopf et al., 
2010) 
Norway 
CO
2
Storage 
Atlas: 
Norwegian Sea  
(Norwegian 
Petroleum 
Directorate, 
2011) 
18. Treatment of 
geological 
uncertainty 
Ranking of 
storage options 
partially based 
on quality of 
available data 
Primarily 
accounted for 
with the storage 
efficiency 
estimate 
Yes, capacity 
assessment must 
include the 
uncertainties in 
geological 
properties 
The probabilistic 
assessment of 
each structure 
takes account of 
geological 
uncertainty 
Ranking of 
storage options 
partially based 
on quality of 
available data 
19. Assessment 
method for 
storage resource 
in hydrocarbon 
fields 
Estimated by 
calculating the 
maximum 
theoretical CO
2
replacement 
volume for all 
hydrocarbon 
fields using 
reserves 
estimates and 
production data 
Tanaka et al. 
(1995) included 
saline aquifers in 
hydrocarbon 
fields, but only 
saline aquifers in 
the vicinity of 
CO
2
emission 
sources are 
considered in the 
current report 
Pressure 
capacity of total 
affected space 
Production 
history approach; 
assuming, that 
the produced gas 
volumes can be 
replaced by the 
equivalent 
volume of CO
2
(1:1) 
Only within 
abandoned 
fields, but no 
fields are 
abandoned 
within the 
Norwegian North 
Sea. Estimated 
which fields 
might cease 
production by 
2050 and 
determined CO
2
storage within 
those abandoned 
fields via 
volumetric 
calculation 
20. Probabilistic 
or deterministic 
estimate of 
hydrocarbon field 
storage potential 
Deterministic 
Deterministic 
Deterministic 
Probabilistic 
Deterministic 
Notes: m = metre; mD = millidarcy. 
* Where the CO
2
 is not likely to be in dense phase. 
** Water with <10 000 ppm TDS. 
 
 
 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 29 
Annex 2: Best practice examples of methodologies 
TASR assessment methodology example (USGS methodology) 
The  methodology  used  by  the  USGS  (Brennan  et  al.,  2010;  Blondes  et  al.,  2013)  is  described 
below as an example of best practice in TASR assessment. The initial step is to identify potential 
SAUs, which must have regional seals that have the potential to retain CO
2
 within the underlying 
storage formation (Figure 1). The seal should have several metres, typically tens of  metres,  of 
very low  permeability  (microdarcy)  rock that will stop the  upward  flow of  CO
2
. When such an 
acceptable regional seal formation has been documented for an SAU, and the boundary of the 
SAU is agreed upon by a review panel, then the geologic data is then vetted to assess the storage 
resource. 
Figure 1 presents a schematic cross section through an SAU. The hatched pattern represents the 
regional seal, whereas the stippled pattern represents the storage formation. The colours within 
the  storage  formation  illustrate  the  relation  between  buoyant  and  residual  trapping  styles 
(Blondes et al., 2013, modified from Brennan et al., 2010). SAU depth limits of 914 m and 3 962 m 
(3 000 ft and 13 000 ft), in accordance with Brennan et al. (2010), are included. 
Figure 1 • A schematic cross section through an SAU 
The data are put into an input form (Figure 2), which collects the most critical data for assessing 
the TASR within the SAU. Critical geologic assessment data include the area and the net porous 
thickness of the storage formation, porosity, depth from land surface to storage formation top, 
and  permeability. The area,  net porous  thickness, and porosity  are used to  estimate the  total 
pore  volume  of  the  SAU.  The  depth  from  surface  is  used  to  estimate  the  range  of  potential 
density and the storage efficiency values for each SAU. The storage efficiency is estimated using 
the relative viscosities of the CO
2
 and groundwater, which are calculated using temperature and 
pressure data from the formation as well as the salinity of the groundwater, or using analogue 
data from a similar basin. The salinity of the groundwater can affect its viscosity, which can affect 
the storage efficiency estimates. The storage efficiency and density, which allows for volume to 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 30
be converted to mass, can be plotted versus depth to estimate the overall range of the values, 
which are then entered into the probabilistic assessment. 
Figure 2 • USGS CO
2
 storage assessment input form  
 
Source: Blondes et al., 2013; modified from Brennan et al., 2010. 
 
The permeability is a proxy to estimate injectivity, which is an estimate of how easily, at some 
given flow  rate,  CO
2
 will  enter  the pore  space (Brennan  et al., 2010).  The  USGS methodology 
assigns three injectivity classes, comprising class 1, which is the percentage of the rock that has 
permeability  greater  than  1 000 millidarcy  (mD);  class  2,  which  is  the  percentage  between 
1 000 mD and 1 mD; and class 3, which is the percentage less than 1 mD. The different injectivity 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested