view pdf winform c# : Add hyperlink to pdf acrobat Library control class asp.net web page html ajax workshop_report_methodstoassessgeologicCO2storagecapacity3-part1442

© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 31 
classes have different storage efficiencies. The storage efficiencies for the three injectivity classes 
for each SAU assessed were determined using the method described in Blondes et al. (2013). 
The USGS uses a minimum depth of about 914 m for CO
2
 storage, as below that depth CO
2
 will be 
a high‐density, supercritical fluid (Figure 1), and thus, in the USGS methodology, the area of an 
SAU  is  the  area  of  the  storage  formation  where  the  top  is  deeper  than  914 m.  This  specific 
minimum depth is a USGS requirement; the participants of the IEA workshop recommended no 
specific depth requirement. 
The tops of formations as identified in well logs are plotted in a GIS, which allows the assessment 
geologist to map where the storage formation top is deeper than this minimum depth. The area is 
then calculated using the GIS, and is given a basic uncertainty range, because mapping the outline 
of  the SAU has uncertainty  depending  on  the  sparseness  of  the  data.  The  USGS methodology 
does not require the storage formation to have a lateral seal; instead there is an assumption that 
the injection of CO
2
 could be engineered to become neutrally buoyant at that depth.  
In addition to the above inputs, the methodology also requires an estimate of the range of the 
potential for buoyant trapping of CO
2
 within the SAU. The USGS methodology requires that single 
buoyant  traps  used  to  estimate  these  parameters  be  greater  than  500 000 boe.  This  value  is 
equivalent to 50 000  to 60 000 tonnes  of CO
2
, depending on the  density of  the  CO
2
 within the 
trap.  To  estimate  the  pore  space  available  for  buoyant  trapping,  the  assessment  geologists 
typically use the volume of hydrocarbons produced from the SAU, corrected by formation volume 
factors (FVF), which converts the surface hydrocarbon volumes to the original subsurface volume, 
as a minimum value. The most likely buoyant pore space value is typically an estimate based on 
the  volume  of  the  produced  hydrocarbons  plus  the  volume  of  undiscovered  hydrocarbons, 
estimated by previous USGS oil and gas assessments. The maximum buoyant storage volume is at 
the discretion of the assessment geologist  in agreement with the review panel; this maximum 
buoyant value estimate is typically based on either mapping the large closures within the storage 
formation from structural contour maps, or geologic models of the trap geometry and potential 
for more similar traps within the formation.  
These  values  are  all  used  to  create  distribution  shapes  for  a  Monte  Carlo  model  that  runs 
thousands of iterations. During each iteration of the Monte Carlo run (Figure 3), the total pore 
volume  and  the  total buoyant  pore  volume are calculated.  The  buoyant  volume  is  subtracted 
from the total pore volume, and the difference becomes the residual pore volume. The residual 
pore volume is then apportioned into the three injectivity classes described above – class 1 (R1), 
class 2 (R2), and class 3 (R3). Respective storage efficiencies are then applied to the volume of 
each injectivity class, and to the buoyant volume, to determine a CO
2
 storage volume. These CO
2
 
volumes  are  then  multiplied  by  the  basin‐average  density  value  to  determine  the  storage 
resource  as  a  mass  of  CO
2
.  The  governing  equations  are  given  in  Brennan  et  al.  (2010)  and 
Blondes et al. (2013). 
In  the  United  States,  most  sedimentary  CO
2
 storage  formations  are  located  within  mature 
hydrocarbon‐producing basins. These basins tend to have a substantial amount of the subsurface 
data  needed  for  assessments.  Where  there  are  sparse  data,  geologic  analogues  may  be  used, 
either from similar formations within the basin, or in nearby basins, or from formations that have 
similar depositional and burial histories in basins worldwide. The prudent use of analogues allows 
the  assessment  geologist  to  estimate  input  values.  However,  assessments  based  solely  on 
analogues, without any data from the storage formation, inherently have greater uncertainty. 
Add hyperlink to pdf acrobat - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add a link to a pdf file; add hyperlink to pdf online
Add hyperlink to pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add links to pdf online; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 32
Figure 3 • Flow diagram of USGS CO
2
 TASR assessment methodology 
Source: Blondes et al., 2013; modified from Brennan et al., 2010.  
Buoyant‐limited assessment methodology example (BGR 
methodology) 
The methodology used by the BGR (Knopf et al., 2010) follows a static, volumetric approach for 
the estimation of CO
2
 storage capacities in known structural or stratigraphic traps. The approach 
considers  neither  potential  interactions  of  pressure  fields  between  storage  sites  or  any  time‐
dependent reservoir processes and injection scenarios. The capacity assessments are solely based 
on geological and/or physical parameters. Further technical, economic or social parameters are 
not  accounted  for.  The  uncertainties  of  geologic  input  parameters  are  accounted  for  by 
performing Monte Carlo simulations.  
The first step in this approach is a review of the geologic conditions in the investigated area to 
identify potentially suitable storage and seal rock units. This includes the screening for existing 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Annotate & Comment. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file.
add hyperlink pdf file; c# read pdf from url
© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 33 
data (e.g. wells and seismic). The following step is to analyse distribution and contour maps of the 
storage and seal rock units. For each reservoir rock unit, areas are outlined that fulfil a predefined 
minimum  depth  of  800 m  at  the  top  of  the  storage  rock  unit  to  ensure  that  the  CO
2
 is  a 
supercritical  fluid.
2
 The  extent  of  a  potentially  suitable  storage  and  seal  rock  unit  pair  below 
800 m is outlined within a GIS. 
Potential  storage  structures  (traps)  such  as  anticlines  are  identified  and  mapped  within  this 
outlined area based on the interpretation of contour maps. The area of each structure is defined 
by  the  deepest structural  contour (spill‐point).  The spill‐point is  defined  as  the location  at the 
base of a trap where the buoyant CO
2
 will escape from, or “spill out” of, the trap and upwards to 
more  shallow  portions  of  the  storage  unit.  Further  specific  parameters  applied  for 
characterisation of potential storage structures for CO
2
 are: 
 areal extent of the structure; 
 depth range between crest of structure and spill‐point; 
 net thickness of reservoir rocks; and 
 porosity of the reservoir rock. 
Based  on  the  findings,  the  CO
2
 storage  capacity  of  each  trap  is  estimated  by  calculating  the 
average pore volume of each trap, and multiplying that value by a site‐specific storage efficiency 
and the density values.  
Considering  the  nature  of  regional  geological  assessments,  some  calculation  parameters 
(especially  porosity  values)  cannot  be  determined  accurately  for  each  storage  structure.  The 
calculations  are  therefore  partly  based  on  analogues.  In  order  to  account  for  parameter 
uncertainties on the calculated storage capacities, Monte Carlo simulations are performed. For 
each potential storage structure 10 000 runs of capacity calculations have  been performed. To 
determine the pore volume within structures a normal or uniform distribution was assumed. For 
the CO
2
 density, a constant distribution of 625 ± 75 kilograms per cubic metre (kg/m
3
) is used for 
all  calculations. Storage  efficiencies  are  assumed  to  range between  5%  and  20%,  exhibiting  a 
triangular distribution pattern and a median value of about 10%. For each storage structure the 
Monte  Carlo  simulation  results  in  10 000  capacity  values,  and  are  plotted  as  a  frequency 
distribution. Three capacity values with simulated probabilities of 90%, 50% and 10% are listed 
for each structure. 
In the final step, individual storage capacities of all structures are summed into the CO
2
 storage 
capacity of the investigated area. 
Pressure‐limited assessment methodology example (TNO 
methodology) 
The methodology used by the TNO (Neele et al., 2011a) incorporates the concept of total affected 
space,  i.e. the entire space  whose state or qualities change during the  total  storage time  as  a 
result of the storage operation,  to  estimate CO
2
 storage resource. The  total affected  space,  in 
combination  with  a  maximum  allowable  average  pressure  increase  in  the  affected  space, 
determines the ultimate storage potential (Meer and Egberts, 2008). 
In this methodology, three types of pressures are defined: local injection pressures (bottom‐hole 
pressure), regional storage pressures (reservoir pressures), and finally the total average pressure 
                                                                                
 
2
 Again, the IEA makes no recommendation about minimum depth. The minimum depth many methodologies require is to 
ensure that CO
2
 is a supercritical fluid. 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 34
increase  in  the  affected  space.  The  maximum  allowable  regional  storage  pressures  are  site‐
specific  and  related  to  the  mechanical  properties  of  the  seal,  while  the  maximum  allowable 
average pressure increase in the affected space depends on the geological conditions of the total 
system. During the injection cycle of the storage activity, the pressures near the injection location 
are  higher than  those at  the edge of the affected space. The  former will be  controlled by  the 
injectivity, whereas the dynamic development of the latter is the result of pressure conductivity 
of the formation. 
The intended storage location for the CO
2
 must have enough storage space and enough sealing 
capacity to contain the free CO
2
 and prevent it from migrating to the surface. In the TNO method, 
storage capacity can be limited by either the total affected space (which, combined with pressure 
increase and total system compressibility gives the total storage capacity of the system), or the 
buoyant trapping capacity (the volume of the traps in the total affected space).  
 
 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 35 
Annex 3: The USGS method for calculating residual 
storage efficiencies 
The  USGS  methodology  calculates  residual  trapping  storage  efficiencies  (Blondes  et  al.,  2013) 
using  the equation  suggested in  MacMinn,  Szulczewski and  Juanes (2010,  page 349),  which  is 
defined as an approximation of the storage efficiency of a sloping reservoir (interface of storage 
formation and sealing formation is not horizontal), and provides a simple calculation of residual 
storage efficiency: 
 
ε
s
 = Γ
2
/[0.9M + 0.49] 
(1) 
 
where Γ is the capillary trapping number and M is the mobility factor (MacMinn, Szulczewski and 
Juanes,  2010).  The  capillary  trapping  number  and  mobility  factor  are  defined  (MacMinn, 
Szulczewski and Juanes, 2010, pages 333, 334) as: 
 
Γ = S
gr
/(1‐S
wc
 ) 
(2) 
 
M = (k
rg
)(μ
w
)/μ
 
(3) 
 
where S
gr
 is the residual gas saturation after imbibition and S
wc
 is the connate water saturation, or 
irreducible water saturation; k
rg
 is the relative permeability of CO
2
; μ
g
 is the viscosity of CO
2
; and 
μ
w
 is the viscosity of the brine. Values for k
rg
, S
gr
, and S
wc
 are found in experimental (Bennion and 
Bachu, 2005, 2008; Burton, Kumar and Bryant, 2008; Okabe et al., 2010) and modelling studies 
(Kopp et al., 2009a,b; Juanes, MacMinn and Szulczewski, 2010; Okwen, Stewart and Cunningham, 
2010; Szulczewski et al., 2012). Values for μ
g
 are calculated using the equation of state of Span 
and Wagner (1996). Values for μ
w
 are calculated using the Mao and Duan (2008) model, which 
can determine the viscosity of brines of varying salinities. 
 
 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 36
References 
Akbarabadi, M. and M. Piri (2013), “Relative Permeability Hysteresis and Capillary Trapping 
Characteristics of Supercritical CO
2
/Brine Systems: an Experimental Study at Reservoir 
Conditions”, Advances in Water Resources, Vol. 52, Elsevier, pp. 190‐206. 
Ahlbrandt, T.S. and T.R. Klett (2005), “Comparison of Methods used to Estimate Conventional 
Undiscovered Petroleum Resources – World Examples”, Natural Resources Research, Vol. 14, 
No. 3, Springer, pp. 187‐210, doi:10.1007/s11053–005–8076–0 [may require subscription to 
access]. 
Bachu, Stefan (2008), Comparison between Methodologies Recommended for Estimation of CO
2
 
Storage Capacity in Geological Media – Phase III Report, Carbon Sequestration Leadership 
Forum, Washington, D.C., 
www.cslforum.org/publications/documents/PhaseIIIReportStorageCapacityEstimationTaskForc
e0408.pdf. 
Bachu, Stefan, et al. (2007), “CO
2
 Storage Capacity Estimation—Methodology and Gaps”, 
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, Vol. 1, Elsevier, pp. 430‐443, 
doi:10.1016/S1750–5836(07)00086–2 [may require subscription to access].  
Bennion, Brant and Stefan Bachu (2005), “Relative Permeability Characteristics for Supercritical 
CO
2
 Displacing Water in a Variety of Potential Sequestration Zones in the Western Canada 
Sedimentary Basin”, Society of Petroleum Engineers Annual Technical Conference and 
Exhibition Proceedings, Dallas, Tex., 9‐12 October, Paper SPE 95547, doi:10.2118/95547–MS 
[may require subscription to access].  
Bennion, D.B. and Stefan Bachu (2008), “Drainage and Imbibition Relative Permeability 
Relationships for Supercritical CO
2
/Brine and H
2
S/Brine Systems in Intergranular Sandstone, 
Carbonate, Shale, and Anhydrite Rocks”, Society of Petroleum Engineers Reservoir Evaluation 
and Engineering, Vol. 11, No. 3, Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, Tex., pp. 487–
496, doi:10.2118/99326–PA [may require subscription to access]. 
Benson, Sally and Peter Cook (2005), “Underground Geological Storage”, in B. Metz, et al. (eds.), 
IPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage, prepared by Working Group III of 
the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Cambridge University Press, 
Cambridge, and New York, NY, pp. 195‐276, www.ipcc.ch/pdf/special‐
reports/srccs/srccs_chapter5.pdf.  
Blondes, M.S., et al. (2013), “National Assessment of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Resources 
– Methodology Implementation”, U.S. Geological Survey Report Series, Report 2013–1055, 
United States Geological Survey, Reston, VA, http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2013/1055/, accessed 30 
June 2013 
Bradshaw, John, et al. (2007), “CO
2
 Storage Capacity Estimation – Issues and Development of 
Standards”, International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, Vol. 1, Elsevier, pp. 62‐68, 
doi:10.1016/S1750–5836(07)00027–8 [may require subscription to access]. 
Bradshaw, B.E., et al. (2009), Queensland Carbon Dioxide Geological Storage Atlas, compiled by 
Greenhouse Gas Storage Solutions on behalf of Queensland Department of Employment, 
Economic Development and Innovation, Brisbane, Australia, 
http://mines.industry.qld.gov.au/geoscience/carbon‐dioxide‐storage‐atlas.htm. 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 37 
Brennan, S.T., et al. (2010), “A Probabilistic Assessment Methodology for the Evaluation of 
Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage”, U.S. Geological Survey Report Series, Report 2010–1127, 
United States Geological Survey, Reston, VA. 
Burton, M., N. Kumar and S.L. Bryant (2008), “Time‐Dependent Injectivity during CO
2
 Storage in 
Aquifers”, in Society of Petroleum Engineers Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery 
Proceedings, Tulsa, OK, 20‐23 April, Paper SPE 113937, doi:10.2118/113937–MS [may require 
subscription to access]. 
Carbon Storage Taskforce (2009), National Carbon Mapping and Infrastructure Plan – Australia: 
Full Report, Department of Resources, Energy and Tourism, Canberra. 
Charpentier, R.R. and T. R. Klett (2005), “A Monte Carlo Simulation Method for the Assessment of 
Undiscovered, Conventional Oil and Gas”, in USGS Southwestern Wyoming Province 
Assessment Team, National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project; Petroleum Systems and 
Geologic Assessment of Oil and Gas in the Southwestern Wyoming Province, Wyoming, 
Colorado and Utah, USGS Digital Data Series 069–D, Chapter 21, United States Geological 
Survey, Reston, VA, http://pubs.usgs.gov/dds/dds‐069/dds‐069‐d/. 
Gammer, D., et al. (2011), “The Energy Technologies Institute's UK CO
2
 Storage Appraisal Project 
(UKSAP)”, paper presented at SPE Offshore Europe Oil and Gas Conference, Aberdeen, 6‐8 
Sept, SPE No. 148426. 
Goodman, A., et al. (2013), “Comparison of Publicly Available Methods for Development of 
Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide in Saline Formations”, National Energy 
Technology Laboratory Technical Report Series, NETL‐TRS‐1‐2013, U.S. Department of Energy, 
National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV. 
Gorecki, C.D., et al. (2009), “Development of Storage Coefficients for Determining the Effective 
CO
2
 Storage Resource in Deep Saline Formations”, in Society of Petroleum Engineers 
International Conference on CO
2
 Capture, Storage and Utilization Proceedings, San Diego, 
Calif., 2‐4 November, SPE No. 126444, doi:10.2118/126444–MS [may require subscription to 
access]. 
IEAGHG (2009), Development of Storage Coefficients for Carbon Dioxide Storage in Deep Saline 
Formations, Technical Study Report No. 2009/13, IEAGHG, Cheltenham. 
IEA (International Energy Agency) (2013), Resources to Reserves – Oil, Gas and Coal Technologies 
for the Energy Markets of the Future, Organisation for Economic Co‐operation and 
Development/IEA, Paris. 
Juanes, Ruben, C.W. MacMinn and M.L. Szulczewski (2010), “The Footprint of the CO
2
 Plume 
during Carbon Dioxide Storage in Saline Aquifers; Storage Efficiency for Capillary Trapping at 
the Basin Scale”, Transport in Porous Media, Vol. 82, No. 1, Springer, Dordrecht, pp. 19–30, 
doi:10.1007/s11242–009–9420–3 [may require subscription to access]. 
Klett, T.R., et al. (2005), Glossary in USGS Southwestern Wyoming Province Assessment Team, 
National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project; Petroleum Systems and Geologic Assessment of Oil 
and Gas in the Southwestern Wyoming Province, Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah, U.S.G.S Digital 
Data Series 69–D, Chapter 25, United Stated Geological Survey, Reston, VA, 
http://pubs.usgs.gov/dds/dds‐069/dds‐069‐d/. 
Kopp, A., H. Class and R. Helmig (2009a), “Investigations on CO
2
 Storage Capacity in Saline 
Aquifers, Part 1, Dimensional Analysis of Flow Processes and Reservoir Characteristics”, 
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, Vol. 3, No. 3, Elsevier, pp. 263–276. 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 38
Kopp, A., H. Class and R. Helmig (2009b), “Investigations on CO
2
 Storage Capacity in Saline 
Aquifers, Part 2, Estimation of Storage Capacity Coefficients”, International Journal of 
Greenhouse Gas Control, Vol. 3, No. 3, Elsevier, pp. 277–287. 
Knopf, S., et al. (2010), “Neuberechnung möglicher Kapazitäten zur CO
2
‐Speicherung in tiefen 
Aquifer‐Strukturen” (Recalculation of Potential Capacities for CO
2
 Storage in Deep Aquifers), 
BGR, Hanover, pp. 76‐80, www.bgr.bund.de/DE/Themen/CO
2
Speicherung/Downloads/ET‐
knopf‐2010.html. 
MacMinn, C.W., M.L. Szulczewski and Ruben Juanes (2010), “CO
2
 Migration in Saline Aquifers, 
Part 1, Capillary Trapping Under Slope and Groundwater Flow”, Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 
Vol. 662, Cambridge University Press, pp. 329‐351. 
Mao, S. and Z. Duan (2008), “The P, V, T, x Properties of Binary Aqueous Chloride Solutions up to 
T = 573 K and 100 MPa”, Journal of Chemical Thermodynamics, Vol. 40, No. 7, Elsevier, pp. 
1046‐1063. 
Meer, B. van der and P. Egberts, (2008), “Calculating subsurface CO
2
 storage capacities”, The 
Leading Edge, Vol. 27, No. 4, Society of Exploration Geophysicists, Tulsa, OK, pp. 502–505. 
NACAP (North American Carbon Atlas Partnership) (2012), The North American Carbon Storage 
Atlas, NACAP, www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/carbon_seq/refshelf/NACSA2012.pdf. 
Neele, F., et al. (2011a), CO
2
 Storage Capacity Assessment Methodology, Report TNO‐060‐UT‐
2011‐00810, TNO (Geological Survey of the Netherlands), Utrecht.  
Neele, F., et al. (2011b), Independent Storage Assessment of Offshore CO
2
 Storage Options for 
Rotterdam ‐ Summary Report, Report TNO‐060‐UT‐2011‐00809, TNO, Utrecht. 
Neele, F., et al. (2012), Independent Assessment of High‐Capacity Offshore CO
2
 Storage Options, 
Report TNO‐060‐UT‐2012‐00414 / B, TNO, Utrecht. 
Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (2011), CO
2
 Storage Atlas Norwegian North Sea, Norwegian 
Petroleum Directorate, Stavanger,  
www.npd.no/Global/Norsk/3‐Publikasjoner/Rapporter/PDF/CO
2
‐ATLAS‐lav.pdf. 
Ogawa, T., et al. (2011), “Saline‐Aquifer CO
2
 Sequestration in Japan – Methodology of Storage 
Capacity Assessment”, International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, Vol. 5, No. 1, Elsevier, 
pp. 318‐326. 
Okabe H. and Y. Tsuchiya (2008), “Experimental Investigation of Residual CO
2
 Saturation 
Distribution in Carbonate Rocks”, paper presented at the International Symposium of the 
Society of the Core Analysts, Abu Dhabi, 29 October–2 November. 
Okabe, H., et al. (2010), “Residual CO
2
 Saturation Distributions in Rock Samples Measured by 
X‐Ray CT”, Proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on X‐Ray CT for Geomaterials, New 
Orleans, La., pp. 381–389. 
Okwen, R. T., M.T. Stewart and J.A. Cunningham (2010), “Analytical Solution for Estimating 
Storage Efficiency of Geologic Sequestration of CO
2
”, International Journal of Greenhouse Gas 
Control, Vol. 4, No. 1, Elsevier, pp. 102‐107. 
Olea, R. A. (2011), “On the Use of the Beta Distribution in Probabilistic Resource Assessments”, 
Natural Resources Research, Vol. 20, No. 4, Springer, pp. 377‐388. 
Prelicz, R.M., E.A.V. Mackie and C.J. Otto (2012), “Methodologies for CO
2
 Storage Capacity 
Estimation: Review and Evaluation of CO
2
 Storage Atlases”, First Break, Vol. 30, No. 2, EAGE 
Publications, Houten, pp. 70 – 76 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
 
Page | 39 
Schlumberger (2011), Injectivity Test, entry in Schlumberger Oilfield Glossary, Schlumberger 
website accessed 20 December 2012 
www.glossary.oilfield.slb.com/Display.cfm?Term=injectivity%20test. 
Span, R. and W. Wagner, (1996), “A New Equation of State for Carbon Dioxide Covering the Fluid 
Region from the Triple‐Point Temperature to 1100 K at Pressures up to 800 MPa”, Journal of 
Physical and Chemical Reference Data, Vol. 25, No. 6, AIP Publishing, Gaithersburg, MD, pp. 
1509‐1596. 
Szulczewski, M. L., et al. (2012), “Lifetime of Carbon Capture and Storage as a Climate‐Change 
Mitigation Technology”, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States, 
Vol. 109, No. 14, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC, pp. 5185–5189. 
US DOE (United States Department of Energy) NETL (National Energy Technology Laboratory) 
(2008), Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada (2nd Edition, Atlas II), US 
DOE, Washington, DC. 
www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/carbon_seq/refshelf/atlasII/2008%20ATLAS_Introduction.pdf 
accessed May 12 2010. 
US DOE NETL (2012), The United States 2012 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (4th Edition, 
Atlas IV) (DOE/NETL‐2012/1589), US DOE, Washington, DC. 
www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/carbon_seq/refshelf/atlasIV/index.html, accessed 28 March 
2013. 
US EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) (2009), Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), 
US EPA, Washington, D.C., www.epa.gov/ogwdw/sdwa/index.html, accessed January 14, 
2009.  
US EPA (2010), Final Rule for Federal Requirements under the Underground Injection Control 
Program for Carbon Dioxide Geologic Sequestration Wells, US EPA, Washington, D.C., 
http://water.epa.gov/type/groundwater/uic/class6/gsregulations.cfm, accessed October 15, 
2012. 
Zhou, Q., et al. (2008).], “A method for quick assessment of CO
2
 storage capacity in closed and 
semi‐closed saline formations”, International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, Vol. 2, No. 4, 
Elsevier, pp. 626‐639. 
 
 
Methods to assess geologic CO
2
 storage capacity 
© OECD/IEA 2013 
 
Page | 40
 
Acronyms, abbreviations and units of measure 
Acronyms and abbreviations 
B
PV
 
buoyant trapping pore volume 
B
SE
 
buoyant trapping storage efficiency 
B
SR 
buoyant trapping storage resource 
B
SV
 
buoyant trapping storage volume 
BGR 
German Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources 
CCS 
carbon capture and storage 
CO
2
 
carbon dioxide 
CSLF 
Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum 
FVF 
formation volume factor 
GIS  
geographic information system 
IEA 
International Energy Agency 
permeability 
NACAP 
North American Carbon Atlas Partnership 
NETL 
National Energy Technology Laboratory 
R1 
residual trapping class 1 
R2 
residual trapping class 2 
R3 
residual trapping class 3 
R
PV 
residual trapping pore volume 
R
SE
  
residual trapping storage efficiency 
R
SR
  
residual trapping storage resource 
R
SV 
residual trapping storage volume 
SAU 
storage assessment unit 
SF 
storage formation 
SF
PV 
storage formation pore volume 
TASR 
technically accessible storage resource 
TA
SR 
technically accessible storage resource 
T
pi
 
net porous thickness 
TA
SV
  
technically accessible storage volume 
TDS  
total dissolved solids 
TNO 
Geological Survey of the Netherlands 
US DOE 
United States Department of Energy 
USGS 
United States Geological Survey 
Φ 
porosity 
 
Units of measure 
boe  
barrel of oil equivalent 
ft 
feet 
kg/m
kilograms per cubic metre 
metre 
m
cubic metre 
mD 
millidarcy 
mg/L  
milligrams per litre 
MtCO
2
 
million tonnes of carbon dioxide 
tonne 
 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested