view pdf winform c# : Add a link to a pdf in preview application SDK utility azure wpf .net visual studio WP002_CanadaDigitizationOfCourtProcesses201210230-part1446

!
!
!
!
"""
"
"
"""
"
"
"""
"
"
Document""de
"""
"
travail/Working
"""
"
Paper
"""
"
"
"""
"
"
"
!
N°"":
"""
"
2
"""
"
"
Titre/Title
"""
"
:"DIGITIZATION OF COURT PROCESSES IN CANADA""
"
Date"":
"""
"
23"octobre"2012"
"
"
"
Auteur(s)/Author(s)"":
"""
"
Jane"Bailey"
Courriel/Email:
"""
"
jbailey@uottawa.ca"
"
"
Résumé/Abstract""(300
"""
"
mots/words)
"""
"
"
The goal of the research underlying this report was to better understand the state 
of digitization of court processes in Canada, including wherever possible to 
determine where we are, where we’ve been and what has already been planned 
for the future.  Our research was limited to an examination of the public online 
record that was initially performed by an amazing, dedicated group of University 
of Ottawa law student volunteers for the Centre for Internet Policy and Public 
Interest Clinic (CIPPIC) who scoured for information online in relation to their 
assigned jurisdiction.  The research and this draft report focused on technologies 
being implemented in or by courts, rather than looking specifically for 
information about electronic/digital issues as between parties to litigation. 
!
!
!
!
!
!"#$%&'(")*#"+*#,++'-"**.#/#$"+#$0%.*+#$1,'*"'0#"*#)"#2"'*#3*0"#'*.4.+5#6'7/#$"+#8.)+#2"0+%))"44"+#"*#
)%)#4'&0,*.9"+:#;%'+#)"#2%'9"<#20")$0"#,'&')"#$%))5"#$"#&"#+.*"#=)*"0)"*#2%'0#4,#0"8%0(,*"0>#
0"20%$'.0"#%'#05,88.&?"0#/#$"+#8.)+#4'&0,*.9"+:#;%'+#)"#2%'9"<#0"8%0(,*"0>#0"20%$'.0"#%'#05,88.&?"0#
')#%'#$"+#$%))5"@+A#$"#&"#+.*"#=)*"0)"*#/#$"+#8.)+#)%)#4'&0,*.9"+#6'"#+.#@.A#9%'+#05,88.&?"<#4"#*.*0">#
47,'*"'0#"*B%'#')#05+'(5#2%'0#')#$%&'(")*#2"0+%))"4#.)&4'+#$,)+#4,#+50.">#,9"&#')#?C2"04.")#
2%.)*,)*#9"0+#&"#$%&'(")*>#"*#@..A>#9%'+#"D"0&"<#)7.(2%0*"#6'"4+#$0%.*+#+'2245(")*,.0"+##&%)8505+#
$.0"&*"(")*#2,0#4,#4%.#%'#2,0#47,'*"'0#%'#2,0#')#,'*0"#$5*")*"'0#$"#$0%.*+#$7,'*"'0#9,4,E4"+:#!"+#
"D&"2*.%)+>#2%'0#41'*.4.+,*.%)#/#$"+#8.)+#)%)#4'&0,*.9"+>#+1,224.6'")*#+"'4"(")*#,'D#$%&'(")*+#
+25&.8.6'"+:#F44"+#)"#*0,)+("**")*##2,+#$"#$0%.*+#$"#0"20%$'.0"#%'#$"#+"#+"09.0#,'*0"(")*#$"#*%'*#%'#
2,0*."#+'E+*,)*."44"#$"#4,#E,+"#$"#$%))5"+#$'#G,E%0,*%.0"#$"#!CE"0-'+*.&":##
!
H?.+#$%&'(")*#.+#+'E-"&*#*%#&%2C0.I?*#,)$#.+#(,$"#,9,.4,E4"#+%4"4C#8%0#2"0+%),4>#)%)
J
J
J
&%(("0&.,4#
'+":#K%'#(,C#)%*#*,L"#,)C#(,*"0.,4#80%(#*?.+#M"E+.*"#,)$#0"8%0(,*>#0"2%+*>#%0#0"$.+24,C#.*#8%0#
&%(("0&.,4#2'02%+":#K%'#(,C#)%*#0"8%0(,*>#0"2%+*>#%0#0"$.+24,C#,)C#(,*"0.,4#80%(#*?.+#M"E+.*"#8%0#
)%)
J
J
J
&%(("0&.,4#2'02%+"+#20%9.$"$#?%M"9"0#*?,*#@.A#C%'#(,C#0"$.+24,C#*?"#*.*4">#,'*?%0#,)$B%0#
,E+*0,&*#8%0#,)#.)$.9.$',4#$%&'(")*#.)&4'$"$#.)#*?"#+"0."+>#*%I"*?"0#M.*?#,#4.)L#*%#*?,*#$%&'(")*1+#
4%&,*.%)>#,)$#@..A#C%'#(,C#"D"0&.+"#,)C#,$$.*.%),4#0.I?*+#I0,)*"$#$.0"&*4C#EC#4,M#%0#EC#*?"#,'*?%0#%0#
Add a link to a pdf in preview - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink to pdf online; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
Add a link to a pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf hyperlink; add link to pdf
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
DIGITIZATION OF COURT PROCESSES IN CANADA 
by Jane Bailey
*
23 October 2012 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Page 
INTRODUCTION 
I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
II. LEGAL SYSTEMS & ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE 
A.  Geography and population 
B.  Legal systems and traditions 
C.  Constitutional, court and court administrative structures 
1. Federal, provincial & territorial powers 
2. The courts and other legal decision making bodies 
3. Subject matter jurisdiction of the courts 
4. Administration of the courts 
D. Challenges facing the legal system 
10 
III. DIGITIZATION OF COURT PROCESSES 
A. External websites 
B. Social media 
C. Other communications 
1. Public view terminals 
2. Public internet access in courtrooms 
3. E-mail communications with lawyers/litigants 
4. Internal communications and training 
5. Webstreaming 
6. Audioconferencing 
7. Videoconferencing 
(i) Configuring and paying for videoconferencing 
(ii) Goals underlying use of videoconferencing 
(iii) Protocols for use of videoconferencing  
8. Assistive devices for persons with disabilities 
D. Electronic case administration and management 
1. Case management systems 
2. Electronic filing 
3. Electronic docketing and scheduling 
E. Courtroom technology 
F. Other systems 
10 
10 
11 
11 
11 
12 
12 
12 
13 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
19 
21 
23 
24 
25 
IV. CASE MANAGEMENT CASE STUDIES: ONTARIO & BC 
A. Ontario 
B. BC 
C. Questions arising 
25 
26 
28 
28 
CONCLUSION 
29 
APPENDIX “A”  
KEY STEPS IN CIVIL AND CRIMINAL LITIGATION IN CANADA 
I. CIVIL LITIGATION 
II. CRIMINAL LITIGATION 
30 
30 
34 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview component enables compressing and
add link to pdf file; adding hyperlinks to pdf documents
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo
add links in pdf; convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
INTRODUCTION 
The goal of the research underlying this report was to better understand the state of 
digitization of court processes in Canada, including wherever possible to determine 
where we are, where we’ve been and what has already been planned for the future.  Our 
research was limited to an examination of the public online record that was initially 
performed by an amazing, dedicated group of University of Ottawa law student 
volunteers for the Centre for Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC) who 
scoured for information online in relation to their assigned jurisdiction.  The research and 
this draft report focused on technologies being implemented in or by courts, rather than 
looking specifically for information about electronic/digital issues as between parties to 
litigation.  The research group encountered a series of challenges, including an 
asymmetry in online reporting between jurisdictions, a dearth of information about the 
specific software and hardware employed, and sometimes-frustrating differences in the 
arrangements between courts and provincial/territorial/federal governments in terms of 
how decisions about technology were made and who was responsible for carrying them 
out and reporting on them.  Despite these limitations, we hope this necessarily partial 
sketch will be of use in terms of developing a better general understanding of the kinds of 
court processes being digitized in Canada, as well as in identifying areas where more 
research and information gathering is needed.   
The report proceeds in 4 parts.  Part I provides an Executive Summary of the overall 
contents of the report.  Part II provides background information about the Canadian legal 
system and the administration of justice in Canada.  Part III provides an overview of the 
digitization of court processes in Canada, looking at external websites, social media, 
other kinds of communications (e.g. public view terminals, public internet access in 
courtrooms, webstreaming, audioconferencing, videoconferencing and assistive 
technologies for persons with disabilities), electronic case administration and 
management (e.g. case management systems, electronic filing and electronic scheduling), 
e-courtrooms, and other systems (e.g. maintenance enforcement systems, online payment 
systems and jury management systems).  Part IV briefly compares the experiences of 
Ontario and BC  in implementing (or, in Ontario’s case, attempting to implement) web-
enabled case management systems, noting some of the issues and inquiries these case 
studies raise about the purposes and implementation of case management systems and the 
digitization of court processes more generally.  The Conclusion suggests further areas for 
research, particularly with respect to the relationship between technology and pressing 
issues of access to justice.  
I. 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
Geography and population - Canada is geographically large with a relatively small 
geographically dispersed, ethnically, culturally and linguistically diverse population that 
is heavily concentrated along its southern border.   
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe provide users the most individualized PDF page image inserting function, allowing developers to add and insert
check links in pdf; clickable pdf links
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
adding links to pdf document; add links to pdf document
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
Legal systems and traditions -  Canada is a bilingual (French and English), bijuridical 
(civil and common law in Quebec, common law elsewhere) jurisdiction, with First 
Nations, Métis and Inuit legal systems and traditions increasingly being recognized both 
informally and formally (through negotiated self-government agreements). 
Division of powers - Politically, Canada is a federal state, where legislative powers are 
divided between the federal Parliament, and the 13 provincial and territorial legislative 
bodies.  While Parliament has jurisdiction over criminal law, provinces and territories 
have jurisdiction over civil law, as well as the administration of justice within their 
borders.   
Role of courts - Canada is a constitutional democracy, so that courts are the ultimate 
arbiters over the limits of government authority pursuant to the Constitution Act, 1867 
(the division of federal/provincial/territorial powers) and the Charter of Rights and 
Freedoms (setting out the parameters of the government’s relationship with individual 
rights and freedoms). 
Court structure and administration - The federal courts include the Supreme Court of 
Canada (SCC) (the ultimate appellate court in the country), the Federal Court, the Tax 
Court of Canada and the Courts Martial.  Each province and territory (generally) has a 
Court of Appeal (highest provincial/territorial appellate court), a Superior Court (court of 
inherent jurisdiction) and a Provincial/Territorial Court (court of more limited jurisdiction 
that generally deals with most criminal matters at first instance).  Superior Court judges 
are appointed by the federal head of state, while Provincial/Territorial Court judges are 
appointed by the province/territory.  There is a plethora of federally and 
provincially/territorially created administrative bodies handling specific areas of law by 
virtue of statute (eg labour, human rights), from whose decisions judicial review and/or a 
right of appeal may lie to the courts.  Courts’ administration is typically overseen by a 
court services branch or division of the respective provincial/territorial/federal Ministry 
of Attorney General/Department of Justice. 
Access to justice challenges - The Chief Justice of Canada has said that Canada is facing 
an access to justice crisis.  Canada’s access to justice concerns include: the prohibitive 
cost of litigation (which is said to preclude all but the few who qualify for legal aid and 
the very wealthy from litigating) and an associated rise in the number of self-represented 
litigants, the physical inaccessibility of courts and court processes (relating both to issues 
of ability, as well as geographic remoteness), delays in case processing and resolution, 
and the particular failings of the unreformed criminal justice system in relation to 
indigenous populations.  Technology has been proffered in many forms as an answer to 
access to justice issues on the basis that it may, among other things, reduce cost and 
delay, better connect the justice system with remote/under-served communities, and 
allow for widespread distribution of legal information and resources. 
Technology and court processes  - Our review of the online public record reveals the 
following about the status of technologies in Canadian courts and related processes: 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Able to add a single text character and text string to PDF files using online source codes in C#.NET Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe
clickable links in pdf; add links to pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Independent component for splitting PDF document in preview without using external PDF VB.NET PDF Splitting & Disassembling DLLs. Add necessary references:
add url link to pdf; add hyperlinks pdf file
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
1.  websites - all federal, provincial and territorial courts have websites that provide 
access to a variety of basic information about the courts and related court 
processes (including searchable databases of their decisions), with some providing 
or having piloted linked webcasts of hearings or court events (e.g. SCC, BC, 
Ontario, Nova Scotia), and some providing access to forms that may be filled and 
filed online (e.g. Tax Court of Canada, Alberta CA); 
2.  social media – while most Canadian courts seem to have unofficial Facebook 
pages, other than a few courts that provide RSS newsfeeds (e.g. Ontario) and offer 
Twitter updates (e.g. Nova Scotia), we found little evidence of widespread 
engagement with social media, although the issue is clearly under study (e.g. BC); 
3.  other communications –  
a.  public view terminals have been piloted in Ontario, internet access is 
available in some courts, at least for counsel (e.g. Nova Scotia, Ontario); 
b.   e-mail is fairly widely used as a mechanism for communications between 
courts and litigants/counsel (e.g. Nunavut, Ontario, Alberta, New 
Brunswick, Quebec); 
c.  intranets have been developed to allow for more secure communications 
between judges and other members of the judicial community; 
d.  webstreaming – the SCC webcasts its hearings and archives them online, 
while others have piloted webcasting for hearings and court events (e.g. 
BC, Ontario, Nova Scotia); 
e.  audioconferencing – is expressly permitted by the Criminal Code of 
Canada for obtaining telewarrants and for certain kinds of appearances 
(e.g. bail hearings) under specified conditions, and it would appear that all 
jurisdictions use teleconferencing for those permitted purposes.  In 
addition, certain jurisdictions permit teleconferencing for arguing motions 
(e.g. Alberta, BC, Manitoba, New Brunswick, NWT, Nunavut, Ontario, 
Québec, Yukon) and for attendance at certain kinds of case conferences 
(e.g. Newfoundland, PEI, Québec and Yukon), while whole cases may be 
argued this way at the SCC and in the Federal and Tax Courts.  Its use for 
transmission of evidence at a hearing appears more limited; 
f.  videoconferencing – is also permitted for certain kinds of appearances 
under the Criminal Code of Canada and heavily used for bail hearings and 
other appearances by in-custody accused persons (e.g. Alberta, BC, 
Manitoba, Newfoundland Nova Scotia, Ontario, Saskatchewan).  It is also 
used for transmission of remote witness testimony, entry of guilty pleas, 
case conferences (e.g. Ontario) and also for hearings in the SCC, Federal 
and Tax Courts.  It has repeatedly been proposed as an access to justice 
solution for mediating distance in ways that allow for persons in remote 
communities (particularly Aboriginal persons) to appear at bail hearings 
without having to be removed from their communities.  It has also been 
proposed as a cost saving and security risk reduction measure when used 
to allow for those in-custody to appear in court without the need to be 
physically transported there; 
g.  assistive devices for persons with disabilities – both the federal 
government and the Ontario government have developed accessibility 
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Advanced component for splitting PDF document in preview without any third-party plug-ins installed. C# DLLs: Split PDF Document. Add necessary references:
add a link to a pdf in preview; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Preview PDF documents without other plug-ins. this PDF document metadata adding control, you can add some additional information to generated PDF file
add links to pdf; add hyperlink to pdf
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
guidelines relating to government services, including court services.  
These guidelines are associated with uses of particular kinds of text reader 
technology allowing for shrinkage and magnification of text, as well as 
client-side cascading style sheet files allowing users to configure visual 
elements to meet their needs (e.g. SCC).  Infrared and FM assistive 
listening devices are also available in Ontario courts. 
4.  case administration and management –  
a.  case management systems - while it appears that most or all Canadian 
courts have some form of digitized system for managing cases that 
sometimes integrates a variety of justice system players such as police, 
crown attorneys, etc. (e.g. Ontario, Manitoba, Newfoundland, Nova 
Scotia, Nunavut, Québec) we located only a few that have web-enabled 
systems that include e-filing and e-search functionality (e.g. BC  
Provincial and Supreme Courts, BCCA, Saskatchewan CA); 
b.  e-filing – although some jurisdictions allow or even require electronic 
copies of materials to be filed by e-mail and/or on CD ROM (e.g. SCC, 
Ontario CA, PEI), a few have implemented online efiling systems, at least 
for certain kinds of matters (e.g. Federal Court of Canada, Tax Court of 
Canada, BC, Alberta Prov Ct and CA, Saskatchewan CA, Newfoundland 
Prov Ct and SC); and 
c.  e-scheduling – e-scheduling functionality is in place or in development in 
Manitoba, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan and Alberta; 
5.  courtroom technology – digital audio recording systems (DARS) are in place in 
Alberta, BC and Nova Scotia and are being implemented in Ontario.  Document 
storage, viewing, manipulation and e-exhibit systems are available in a number of 
courts (e.g. Alberta, BC, Ontario, Nova Scotia), as are video display screens, and 
network connections for counsel; and 
6.  other systems – a variety of other digitized systems in Canada were revealed in 
our search, including:  automated systems for recording and enforcing 
maintenance/support orders of family courts (e.g. Alberta, Manitoba, NWT), 
online fine payment portals (e.g. Alberta, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan), and 
automated systems for jury selection that allow citizens to respond electronically 
to jury notices (e.g. BC, Ontario). 
Case studies - Development and implementation of case management systems that are 
web-enabled to assist in information sharing between related agencies, as well as to 
support online public access have been very different experiences in Ontario and BC.  A 
review of some of the basic facts relating to each raises interesting questions about the 
digitization of court processes more generally, including:  how are the problems to which 
technology is proposed as an answer identified? What kinds of development processes 
are most likely to lead to “successful” implementation of technologies?  How is 
“success” to be measured?  Do digitized case management systems reduce delay?  If so, 
how?  If not, why not? 
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Add text to certain position of PDF page in Visual Basic .NET class. Add text to PDF in preview without adobe reader component installed.
add url pdf; add links pdf document
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
II. 
LEGAL SYSTEMS & THE ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE 
A. 
Geography and population 
Large land area, small but dispersed population concentrated along the southern border 
- Canada has the second largest land area of any country in the world (over 9.9 million 
km
2
)
1
, but stands 36
th
in the world in terms of total population (about 34.4 million).
2
It is 
comprised of 10 provinces (Alberta, British Columbia (BC), Manitoba, New Brunswick 
(NB), Newfoundland, Nova Scotia (NS), Ontario, Prince Edward Island (PEI), Québec 
and Saskatchewan) and 3 territories (Northwest Territories (NWT), Nunavut and Yukon 
Territory).  The 3 territories comprise most of Canada’s most northerly territory, 
occupying 39% of the national land area,
3
but only 3% of the total Canadian population.
4
As of 2011, 86% of the Canadian population resided in the provinces of Ontario (38.4%), 
Quebec (23.6%), British Columbia (13.1%) and Alberta (10.9%).
5
Although Canadians 
live in a number of northerly areas, Canada’s population density is heavily concentrated 
along our southern border
6
and the population overall is highly urban (80% in 2006)
7
with significant variations from jurisdiction to jurisdiction (e.g. 2006 census respondents 
in PEI, Nunavut and NWT were more likely to live rurally, while 80% or more of the 
respondents from Quebec, Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia lived in an urban 
location)
8
Ethnically, culturally and linguistically diverse - Canada is also highly ethnically and 
culturally diverse.  As of 2006, 3.8% of census respondents self-identified as Aboriginal 
(including First Nations, Métis and Inuit),
9
19.8% self-identified as having been born 
outside the country
10
and 16.2% self-identified as members of visible minority groups.
11
Although Canada’s official languages are French and English,
12
in the 2006 census 
58.8% of respondents indicated English as their mother tongue, 23.2% indicated French 
and 18% indicated other languages, including over 80 indigenous languages.
13
Respondents identified over 180 languages other than English or French as the languages 
most often spoken at home.
14
B. Legal systems and traditions 
The Canadian legal system is often reputed as a bilingual, bijuridical system in that it 
generally functions in both official languages, and both systems of common and civil law 
operate within its borders.  The Quebec legal system incorporates both civil and common 
law systems, with the Quebec Civil Code governing civil matters and the common law 
governing criminal matters.  All other provinces and territories operate under the 
common law system in relation to both civil and criminal matters. 
Increasingly, however, as indigenous nations are properly recognized as founding 
members of Canada, so too are indigenous legal systems and traditions beginning to be 
formally recognized. Canada had concluded 25 comprehensive land claims and self-
government agreements with First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples within a number of 
jurisdictions including Newfoundland and Labrador, BC, northern Quebec, the Yukon 
Territory, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.
15
Although the terms of individual 
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
agreements vary, self-government can include jurisdiction with respect to laws and the 
administration of justice.
16
Conflicts between federal/provincial/territorial law and 
indigenous law can be subject to resolution processes provided for in agreements, 
although federal law governs in some instances of conflict.
17
As more and more 
agreements are negotiated and as the FPT governments are increasingly forced to 
recognize the ways in which the FPT criminal justice system has failed indigenous 
persons, law and legal processes in relation to indigenous communities seem likely to 
continue to be reshaped.
18
C. 
Constitutional, court and courts administration structures 
1. 
Federal, provincial and territorial powers 
Canada is a federal state.  Federal parliament has an over-riding power to make laws for 
the “Peace, Order and good Government of Canada in relation to all Matters not coming 
within the Classes of Subjects” exclusively assigned to Provincial Legislatures in the 
Constitution Act, 1867, but also has express authority over a variety of matters, including 
immigration, marriage and divorce, and criminal law and procedure (but not the 
constitution of courts of criminal jurisdiction.)
19
Provincial legislatures have exclusive 
jurisdiction over, inter alia, property and civil rights in the province, the administration of 
justice in the province (including provincial courts of civil and criminal jurisdiction and 
in matters of civil procedure), as well as the imposition of punishment for violations of 
provincial laws.
20
However, federal/provincial/territorial agreements (FPTAs) have 
facilitated a greater sharing of constitutional powers and responsibilities between 
parliament and the legislatures, including in relation to justice initiatives such as legal 
aid, and Aboriginal courtworker programs.
21
The courts are the ultimate arbiters of the limits of government power (subject to 
constitutional amendments and/or overrides in certain cases), both in relation to the 
respective jurisdictional capacities of the federal and provincial/territorial governments 
under ss. 91 and 92 of the Constitution Act, 1867, but also in relation to the parameters of 
government’s relationship with individual’s rights and freedoms pursuant to 
constitutional guarantees such as those in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. 
2. 
The courts and other legal decision-making bodies 
Administration of the courts generally falls within the exclusive jurisdiction of the 
provinces to administer justice within the province under s. 92.  Provincial courts include 
courts of inherent or “superior” jurisdiction,
22
as well as courts whose mandates are 
limited by statute.
23
While the provinces have the power to appoint judges to the courts 
of limited jurisdiction, under s. 96 of the Constitution Act, the Governor General (the 
federal head of state) has the exclusive power to appoint judges to provincial courts of 
superior jurisdiction (including provincial Supreme/Superior Courts and Courts of 
Appeal).  Further, judges of the superior and appeal courts of the provinces may only be 
removed from office “on address to the Governor General by both houses of 
Parliament”,
24
thus constitutionally enshrining the independence of the judiciary.
25
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
In addition to the provincial and territorial court systems, there are four federal level 
courts:  the Supreme Court of Canada (the ultimate court of appeal in the nation); the 
Federal Court (which includes both trial and appeal divisions); the Tax Court of Canada; 
and the Courts Martial (for military offences).  Further, a myriad of statutorily created 
administrative bodies and tribunals at both the federal and provincial/territorial level hold 
hearings and make decisions relating to a plethora of legal issues, including human rights, 
workplace health and safety, privacy, competition matters, copyright, labour relations, 
and patents, to name only a very few.  These bodies are governed by statute and their 
decisions may be subject to a statutorily-provided appeal process and/or to judicial 
review by the courts.  Figure 1 provides a general illustration of Canada’s court system. 
Figure 1:  Canada’s Court System
26
3. 
Subject matter jurisdiction of the courts 
The Supreme Court of Canada is the final court of appeal in Canada with jurisdiction in 
all areas of law (civil, criminal, family, constitutional, etc.).  Provincial appellate courts 
have a similar type of subject matter jurisdiction and typically hear appeals from 
decisions of their respective provincial superior courts of record.  Provincial superior 
courts typically have jurisdiction in relation to all kinds of matters not exclusively 
reserved for other courts (including the most serious criminal cases, civil actions,
27
and 
divorce proceedings
28
), as well as (in some cases) authority to hear appeals from the 
decisions of their respective courts of limited jurisdiction.  Provincial courts of limited 
jurisdiction can deal with both provincial/territorial and federal laws, dealing 
predominantly with most kinds of criminal offences (including all preliminary inquiries), 
family law matters (excluding divorce), criminal offenders under age 18, traffic offences, 
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
provincial regulatory offences and, in some jurisdictions, civil cases relating to matters 
under a specified dollar amount.
29
The Federal Court and Federal Court of Appeal are superior courts with jurisdiction 
limited to matters specified in federal statutes.  The Federal Court may conduct trials and 
hear appeals or judicial review applications from certain federal administrative tribunals 
and deals with such issues as copyright, federal-provincial disputes and competition laws.  
The Federal Court of Appeal hears appeals from the decisions of the Federal Court, and 
also has jurisdiction to hear appeals or judicial review applications from certain federal 
administrative tribunals.  In some cases (e.g. maritime law), a matter can be brought 
either before a provincial or territorial superior court, the Federal Court or the Federal 
Court of Appeal.
30
The Tax Court of Canada and military courts (including the Court Martial Appeal Court) 
are specialized federal courts dealing, respectively with disputes arising in relation to 
federal tax and revenue legislation, and cases arising from the Code of Service Discipline 
applicable to members of the Canadian forces and accompanying civilians.
31
Lists reviewing some of the key steps typically found in civil and criminal litigation are 
included in Appendix “A”. 
4. 
Administration of the courts 
The operations of the courts are generally administered under the auspices of the 
respective federal or provincial/territorial Ministry/Department of Justice.  A typical sort 
of provincial/territorial model is for the provincial/territorial Ministry of the Attorney 
General to include a Court Services Branch/Division that is responsible for delivery of 
court administrative services throughout the province/territory, which includes services 
such as registries (where documents are filed, collected and managed), clerks, security, 
prisoner custody and prisoner escort services.
32
In at least one case, the Court Services 
Division includes a branch that is specifically devoted to planning, development and 
implementation of IT systems and supporting models.
33
In order to maintain judicial independence, it is also essential that judicial information (e-
mails, draft judgments, bench memos, etc.) be housed and maintained separately and 
independently from the kinds of case-related information that a court services branch is in 
charge of administering.  For some Ontario courts, this is dealt with by way of 
Memoranda of Understanding between the Chief Justice of the particular court and the 
provincial Attorney General.
34
Further, since 2008 the Judicial Information Technology 
Office (JITO) has operated in Ontario to ensure judicial oversight in keeping judges’ 
confidential information separate and secure from other Ministry or government 
information.
35
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested