view pdf winform c# : Adding links to pdf application control cloud windows azure html class WP002_CanadaDigitizationOfCourtProcesses201210231-part1447

23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
10 
D. 
Challenges facing the legal system  
The Chief Justice of Canada has labeled  “access to justice” a crisis facing the Canadian 
legal system,
36
raising the concern that public confidence in the justice system will wane 
if only the wealthy and those qualifying for legal aid can actually use the court system 
(although the availability of legal aid is increasingly limited in many Canadian 
jurisdictions, especially in relation to civil matters
37
). Access to justice, then, has 
relatively recently been framed as a concern for the “middle class”, generating reports 
and initiatives to address this aspect of the issue.
38
Other access to justice concerns 
include the physical inaccessibility of courts and court processes (including for reasons 
related to geographic distance, as well as differences in ability); increases in the number 
of self-represented litigants; delays in the processing and resolution of both civil and 
criminal cases; and the particular failings of an unreformed criminal justice system in 
relation to Aboriginal persons. 
To the extent that the prohibitive cost of litigation has been identified as a primary 
problem, various efforts have been made to simplify and expedite procedures, to involve 
judicial and court staff more directly in the management of cases, to require parties to 
participate in alternative dispute resolution mechanisms and to provide better information 
for self-represented litigants.
39
In addition, the increasing cost of providing justice 
services has become a source of strife between and amongst justice system participants.
40
Technology has also been looked upon as a mechanism not only for increasing the 
physical accessibility of courts and court processes, better distributing legal information 
and better connecting courtrooms with communities, but also for cutting labour, 
transportation and other justice system costs through mechanization.  As will be 
discussed below in Part III, it is hoped that electronic case management systems and 
efiling will improve operating efficiencies, that greater online access to court and legal 
information will improve the accessibility of the law, and that distance mediating 
technologies like videoconferencing will not only reduce the cost of prisoner transport for 
attendance at hearings, but also enhance access to justice in remote communities where 
courts may sit irregularly while “on circuit”.   
III.  DIGITIZATION OF COURT PROCESSES 
Our online review of information about the state of digitization in the provincial, 
territorial and federal courts of Canada yielded both an inconsistent quality and quantity 
of information from one jurisdiction to the next.  As a result, this section of the report is 
not an exhaustive inventory.  Instead, relying on the limited information publicly 
available online it comments on general trends and notable examples in relation to 
various aspects of digitization/online presence.   
A. 
External websites 
All of Canada’s provincial, territorial and federal courts and the Supreme Court of 
Canada have websites that include address and contact information, court hours, general 
information about the function of the court, links to the rules of court (and usually 
Adding links to pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf link to specific page; clickable links in pdf from word
Adding links to pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf hyperlinks; active links in pdf
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
11 
practice directions and forms), as well as a searchable database of the court’s decisions 
and/or a link to the searchable CanLII database (or to SOQUIJ for Québec courts).  Most 
also provide links to other resources, such as public legal information centres, legal aid 
offices and/or the Ministry of the Attorney General related to that particular court.  
However, there were certain types of features on various courts’ websites that were 
noteworthy, generally in terms of providing more varied kinds of access to case and law-
related information, including: 
1.  links to live webcasts and/or webcast archives of court hearings and/or to 
other types of public events taking place in the courtroom;
41
2.  links to fillable forms
42
and/or online digital assistant technologies that 
provide step-by-step instruction to citizens on how to complete court forms;
43
3.  links to a portal for filing electronic documents;
44
4.  links to allow users to subscribe for RSS news feeds and/or tweets from the 
court;
45
5.  links to instructional videos
46
providing public legal information and/or 
instruction, as well as video “ads” for certain kinds of court services;
47
6.  links to online registration for media to request e-mail notice in advance of 
impending applications for discretionary publication bans;
48
7.  websites specifically designed to maximize accessibility for persons with 
physical disabilities;
49
and 
8.  searchable online repositories of case information (sometimes including 
materials filed).
50
B. 
Social media  
There are “unofficial” Facebook pages for most courts (and many judges) in Canada, 
although none of the official court websites refer to Facebook sites.  As noted above, the 
Alberta Provincial Court has posted a YouTube video promoting the benefits of its online 
scheduling application, numerous courts offer subscriptions to RSS newsfeeds relating to 
court news and the decisions of Nova Scotia courts (as well as other court news) are 
available on Twitter.  
C. 
Other Communications 
A number of Canadian courts use and/or have piloted various kinds of technologies for 
other communications purposes, which are discussed below. 
1. 
Public view terminals 
In 2008, Ontario piloted public view terminals at 3 court locations, which allowed the 
public to search for and view case-based information, with the goal of reducing wait 
times at public service counters.  The pilot was under consideration for province-wide 
expansion in 2008-2009, but it is unclear whether the expansion occurred.
51
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Besides, using this PDF document metadata adding control, you can
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; adding hyperlinks to a pdf
VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
detail guides on these functions through left menu links. guide on C#.NET PPT image adding library. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add links to pdf online; add hyperlink pdf file
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
12 
2. 
Public internet access in courtrooms  
Provision of public internet access in courtrooms and court buildings appears to vary 
from jurisdiction to jurisdiction in Canada.  In Nova Scotia courts, internet access has 
been available at counsel tables, as well as on the bench since 2005.
52
Province-wide 
internet connectivity for court staff and counsel within Ontario courtrooms was 
reportedly an ongoing project in Ontario as of 2009-2010,
53
and as of 2010 court staff 
were able to schedule Court of Appeal matters from the courtroom using wireless 
technology and tablets.
54
Free wireless internet access is available to the public in the 
Supreme Court of Canada.
55
3. 
E-mail communication with lawyers/litigants 
E-mail communication between Canadian courts and counsel or self-represented litigants 
appears fairly common, although the formal purposes for which e-mail is used vary.  For 
example, litigants can use e-mail to file various types of documents with the Nunavut 
Court of Justice,
56
the Ontario Court of Appeal,
57
the Ontario Superior Court of Justice,
58
the Ontario Family Court,
59
the Alberta Provincial Court,
60
and the New Brunswick Court 
of Appeal,
61
and to make hearing-date related requests from the Quebec Court of 
Appeal
62
and the Newfoundland & Labrador Court of Appeal.
63
The Courts of Appeal in 
Ontario, Quebec and BC use e-mail to transmit their reasons for decision to the parties.
64
In PEI, Alberta and BC, registered media outlets receive notification of applications for 
discretionary publication bans by e-mail from the court.
65
4. 
Internal communications and training 
Canadian courts use a variety of technological tools for internal communication purposes, 
including e-mail, telephones and fax.  Internal communications technologies also include 
those relating to separating and securing judicial information, as well as those related to 
staff training/internal knowledge management. 
In order to ensure that the judicial independence mandated by the Constitution is 
protected, certain technological solutions have been employed to secure and separate 
judicial information (e.g. judge’s e-mails, draft judgments, etc) from government 
information.  For example, JUDICOM is used by over “800 federal judges in Canada”, 
and “more than 900 other members of the judicial community including judicial 
assistants, provincial judges and law librarians.”
66
JUDICOM is described as a 
communications system “designed to facilitate and enhance communication, 
collaboration and knowledge sharing by connecting all members within a trusted online 
environment.”
67
It was developed by the Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial 
Affairs and is powered by FirstClass v9.1 software, which “integrates a suite of 
applications, including:  e-mail, calendars, contacts, instant messaging, workgroup 
collaboration, and file or document storage”.
68
Access to and use of JUDICOM is limited 
to 10 judicially-related membership groups and court IT technicians.  All users must first 
apply to use the system by faxing in a completed application.  The JUDICOM portal 
online includes a help centre which, inter alia features “awareness” videos relating to the 
View Images & Documents in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
document or image file, like Word, PDF or TIFF other mature image viewing features, like adding or deleting page And you can find the links to these professional
adding hyperlinks to pdf files; add hyperlink pdf
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
13 
newest version of FirstClass, as well as software and installation instructions.  The courts 
of Quebec,
69
Ontario,
70
and Alberta,
71
also appear to have their own intranets, although 
we have found little information relating to them online. 
As of 2008, the Ontario Ministry of the Attorney General used the content management 
system Plone
72
to maintain its Court Forms online.  In addition, Plone was used to house 
training materials related to various other information management systems and 
applications to create a “knowledge environment for remote learning for staff.”
73
In 
addition, the Ontario Ministry of the Attorney General has used MicroSoft Live 
Meeting
74
and videoconferencing to convene remote training sessions, and used local 
shared training folders to provide materials for remote training on various information 
management systems.
75
5. 
Webstreaming 
As noted above, Supreme Court of Canada hearings are webcast live and the recordings 
archived online.  Hearings or aspects of hearings have also been webcast in Ontario, BC 
and Nova Scotia.
76
6. 
Audioconferencing  
While teleconferencing seems likely to soon be eclipsed by videoconferencing in many 
jurisdictions, it is available (usually on request to the court) in courts across Canada for a 
wide variety of purposes, including: 
1.  applications for search warrants in circumstances where it is impracticable for a 
peace officer to appear in person before a justice;
77
2.  certain preliminary motions/applications (e.g. Alberta,
78
British Columbia,
79
Manitoba,
80
New Brunswick,
81
Northwest Territories,
82
Nunavut,
83
Ontario,
84
Québec,
85
Yukon
86
); 
3.  family mediations (e.g. Nunavut
87
); 
4.  case management and pretrial conferences (e.g. Newfoundland,
88
Prince Edward 
Island,
89
Québec,
90
Yukon
91
); 
5.  bail applications (often outside of regular court hours or where the accused is in a 
remote community) (e.g. Nova Scotia,
92
Nunavut,
93
Saskatchewan
94
); 
6.  the whole or any part of a hearing in the Federal Court of Canada,
95
and the Tax 
Court of Canada;
96
and 
7.  oral submissions in the Supreme Court of Canada.
97
Audioconferencing is specifically available for use in the transmission of testimony and 
for purposes of cross examination in some jurisdictions (e.g. Nova Scotia,
98
Yukon
99
), but 
is explicitly not for use in delivering vive voce evidence under the civil procedural rules 
in Nunavut.
100
Appearance of an accused by telephone is explicitly permitted in the 
context of judicial interim release (bail) hearings by s. 515(2.2) of the Criminal Code.  
However, if the evidence of a witness is to be taken during the bail hearing, the consent 
of the prosecutor and the accused is required “if the accused cannot appear by closed 
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
14 
circuit television or any other means that allow the court and the accused to engage in 
simultaneous visual and oral communication” (s. 515(2.3)). 
Additionally,  use  of  audioconferencing  for  providing  remote  interpretation  is  under 
consideration in Ontario.
101
Teleconferenced oral submissions in the Supreme Court of Canada are transmitted by 
satellite, while in New Brunswick and Newfoundland teleconferences are convened using 
CourtCall.
102
7. 
Videoconferencing  
Videoconferencing is available in courts across Canada, for a wide variety of purposes, 
although (like teleconferencing) the reported nature and extent of its use and availability 
varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.  While videoconferencing is undoubtedly used for 
internal meetings and training, our focus here is on the information we have obtained 
relating to its uses in legal processes involving members of the public (as opposed to 
internal staff, the judiciary, etc.), which include: 
1.  bail hearings/remote first appearances (e.g.  Alberta,
103
BC 
104
Manitoba,
105
Newfoundland,
106
N.S.,
107
Ontario,
108
Saskatchewan,
109
); 
2.  witness testimony from remote locations (e.g. Alberta,
110
New Brunswick,
111
N.S.,
112
Nunavut,
113
Saskatchewan,
114
Yukon
115
); 
3.  solicitors’ meetings with clients in remote locations (e.g. Alberta,
116
BC 
117
N.S.
118
); 
4.  attendance  by accused  persons  on  the  hearing  of  appeals  (e.g.  Alberta,
119
Saskatchewan
120
); 
5.  search warrant applications (e.g. BC 
121
); 
6.  arguing  applications/motions  or  appeals  (e.g.  BC  ,
122
New  Brunswick,
123
NWT,
124
N.S.,
125
Nunavut,
126
Ontario,
127
PEI,
128
Quebec,
129
Saskatchewan,
130
Yukon
131
); 
7.  conducting  mental  fitness assessments  of inmates  in custody  in  non-urban 
locations (e.g. Ontario
132
); 
8.  as an assistive technology to allow an in-hospital witness to testify (e.g. 
Ontario
133
); 
9.  conducting  solicitor/client  assessments  for  clients  in  remote  regions  (e.g. 
Ontario
134
); 
10. entry of guilty pleas by in-custody accused persons (e.g. Ontario
135
); 
11. sentencing of accused persons in remote locations (e.g. Ontario
136
); 
12. case conferences/pretrial conferences (e.g. Ontario,
137
Yukon
138
);  
13. return  applications  under  the  Hague  Convention  on  International  Child 
Abduction (e.g. PEI
139
); and 
14. the whole or any part of a hearing in the Federal Court of Canada,
140
and the 
Tax Court of Canada;
141
and 
15. oral submissions in the Supreme Court of Canada.
142
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
15 
Additionally, use of videoconferencing for providing remote interpretation is in use by 
the  Immigration  and  Refugee  Board  of  Canada,
143
and  is  under  consideration  in 
Ontario.
144
CCTV is also used to allow vulnerable witnesses (e.g. child witnesses and witnesses in 
high security trials) to testify from secure locations outside of the courtroom.
145
(i)  
Configuring and paying videoconferencing 
As noted above, videoconferencing technology is frequently used in Canada to allow an 
accused person who is in custody to appear before a judicial officer for purposes such as 
a bail hearing.  A typical configuration is for the accused to be located in a correctional 
facility or holding centre, while a judge or justice of the peace, a crown attorney and a 
defence lawyer are located in a courtroom.  In addition to a camera in the courtroom and 
in the correctional facility, there may also be a camera in a courthouse interview room 
that allows defence counsel to meet privately with their client.
146
In  Saskatchewan  by  2011,  video  court  suites  were  available  in  some  39  locations 
(including provincial courts, circuit courts, correctional centres and RCMP detachments) 
and  6  “victim  services  soft  rooms”,  of  which  approximately  11  had  ISDN  phone 
numbers, while others relied upon the GOS network.  A bridge has to be set up in order to 
facilitate  communication  between  locations  with  different  types  of  installed  video 
lines.
147
Videoconferencing, fax and  phone  equipment  were also  used  to  establish a 
“Northern Hub” for Justices of the Peace in 2010-2011, allowing for access to high level 
expertise during extended hours to  serve  8 northern communities on matters such as 
remand and release hearings, telewarrant and search warrant applications.
148
The party 
that would normally bear the costs of an appearance would also be responsible for paying 
videoconferencing  charges  relating  to  private  facilities  or  equipment  other  than  the 
equipment available in the courts, but (as of 2011) no charges were payable for use of the 
courts’ equipment or communications system.
149
In BC, the costs of court-initiated videoconferences (for purposes such as appearances by 
persons in-custody and family cases) are absorbed by the Court Services Branch of the 
Ministry of Justice, but counsel and parties pay for use of videoconferencing technology 
“when they would have paid the costs for an in-person appearance”.
150
Counsel must 
file an application to request use of the technology (e.g. for remote witness testimony) 
and agree to pay the charges associated with use of the equipment, but the judge must 
approve use of the technology “in each specific court proceeding”.
151
In addition, the 
requesting party must undertake to make the necessary arrangements and pay the costs 
associated with use of any private facilities (eg at the remote location of the witness) 
outside  of  the  BC  Courts’  Network,  which  as  of  October  2010  included  106 
videoconferencing  systems in  court  locations,  11 in police  locations,  17 in judiciary 
locations,  38  correctional  and  penitentiary  locations,  as  well  as  31  CCTV  witness 
testimony systems located throughout the province.
152
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
16 
(ii)   Goals underlying use of videoconferencing technology 
Videoconferencing technology is consistently described as a way of offering more timely 
access to justice for those in remote communities.  Distance mediation is a particularly 
important feature of videoconferencing technology for communities within provinces and 
territories that are only served by circuit courts that may only physically convene in those 
communities monthly (or which may not be accessible at certain points in the year due to 
weather).
153
In 2007, the Northern Access to Justice Committee in Saskatchewan 
recommended the expanded use of remote appearances as a means to: 
• reduce the need to transport prisoners for routine court appearances;  
• allow prisoners in RCMP cells to be dealt with on a more timely basis;   
• reduce the length of dockets at busy circuit point locations;  
• allow court at circuit point locations to proceed during bad weather days;  and 
• allow counsel to appear by telephone where appropriate.
154
Similarly, the National Council of Welfare joined with the Manitoba Aboriginal Justice 
Inquiry  in  recommending  that  “provincial  and  territorial  governments  use  whatever 
means are necessary, including video conferencing, to conduct bail hearings with the 
accused remaining  in  the  community where  the  offence was  committed”  in  order  to 
reduce the number of Aboriginal persons (including mothers and youths) who were jailed 
in southern detention centres, cutting them off from their homes, families and community 
support systems.
155
For similar reasons, the Nunavut Court of Justice has directed that 
bail hearings should take place in the community in which the arrest occurs either before 
a local Justice of the Peace or by teleconference (in the absence of videoconferencing 
equipment), rather than transporting arrested persons to the Iqaluit remand centre (which 
results in over-crowding, unnecessary expense and pre-hearing delay).
156
Additionally, videoconferencing is viewed as a way of reducing costs and security risks 
by obviating the need to transport persons in-custody to and from detention facilities in 
the criminal context.  Similarly, it may also reduce the expense of witness and counsel 
travel to courts in the context of both criminal and civil cases.
157
However, for  civil 
litigants requesting use of court videoconferencing facilities, the associated equipment,  
telecommunications  charges,
158
any  charges  for  use  of  other  videoconferencing 
equipment and any costs associated with bridging external systems with court systems 
must also be taken into account. 
In Ontario, videoconferencing is often used in the NE and NW regions where the distance 
between court sites can be 100-600 km, using the 2005-award-winning Criminal Justice 
Video  Network  developed  in  collaboration  with  CGI  Group  to  link  criminal  courts, 
correction facilities and police stations.
159
Although by 2010 the project had not met its 
target of 50% of remand hearings by videoconference,
160
it has been credited with both 
access to justice and cost reduction successes.  For example, videoconferencing allowed 
for a judge in Kenora to pass sentence on an Aboriginal person located in Keewaywin, 
which permitted the community and its Chief to participate in the sentencing process.  
The process was enabled by the establishment of linkages between  the courts’ video 
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
17 
network and the Northern Ontario Network (developed through a federal/First Nations 
partnership).
161
Roll out of a more robust Video Over IP platform was planned for 
Ontario in 2008-2009.
162
(iii)  Protocols for use of videoconferencing 
Guidelines and protocols relating to videoconferencing can perhaps best be understood in 
relation to the type of proceeding in which the technology is proposed for use, with 
significant distinctions between civil and criminal proceedings.  Examples relating to 
both kinds of proceedings are set out below. 
Civil – Rule 1.08 of Ontario’s Rules of Civil Procedure provides that where telephone or 
videoconference facilities are available “all or part” of any motion, application, status 
hearing, trial (including oral evidence and argument), reference, appeal or motion for 
leave to appeal, proceeding for judicial review or pre-trial or case conference can be 
conducted using phone or videoconferencing either on consent of the parties with court 
approval or by order of the court.  Under R. 1.08(5) in deciding whether these 
technologies should be used for any particular matter, courts are instructed to consider: 
“(a) the general principle that evidence and argument should be presented orally 
in open court; 
(b) the importance of the evidence to the determination of the issues in the case; 
(c) the effect of the telephone or video conference on the court’s ability to make 
findings, including determinations about the credibility of witnesses; 
(d) the importance in the circumstances of the case of observing the demeanour of 
a witness; 
(e) whether a party, witness or lawyer for a party is unable to attend because of 
infirmity, illness or any other reason; 
(f) the balance of convenience between the party wishing the telephone or video 
conference and the party or parties opposing; and 
(g) any other relevant matter. O. Reg. 288/99, s. 2; O. Reg. 575/07, s. 1.” 
Criminal - Remote appearances by convicted and/or accused persons in criminal matters 
are specifically provided for in the Criminal Code of Canada, although more specific 
requirements are mandated in relation to certain kinds of appearances.  For example 
appearances by accused or convicted persons using CCTV or “other means” relating to 
the following kinds of issues are only permitted so long as the technology “allows the 
court and the person to engage in simultaneous visual and oral communication”:  
1.  orders authorizing the taking of bodily substances on the imposition of 
sentencing (ss. 487.053 and 487.055);  
2.  appearances relating to preliminary inquiries (s.537);  
3.  appearances relating to trial (s. 650(1.1)); 
4.  fitness hearings (s. 672.5(13)); and  
5.  appearances relating to appeals (s. 688(2.1))  
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
18 
In these situations, equipment must be set up to ensure the “simultaneous visual and oral 
communication” required by the Code, including ensuring that the accused can always 
see the judge or justice as well as the party who is speaking.  Additionally, remote 
appearances relating to some of these situations are also governed by other requirements, 
such as: 
1.  allowing for private communication between the accused/convicted person and 
their counsel (e.g. 487.053(2) and 487.055(3.01)); and 
2.  requiring advance agreement by the crown and the accused to the accused 
person’s appearance by video, rather than in person (e.g. s. 537(1)(f) and (k), s. 
650(1.1) and (1.2)).
163
Further, a child witness or a witness under a disability in a criminal trial may testify 
outside of the courtroom provided that “arrangements are made for the accused, the judge 
or justice and the jury to watch the testimony of the witness by closed circuit television or 
otherwise and the accused is permitted to communicate with counsel while watching the 
testimony” (s. 486.2(7)).   
Once any procedural or statutory requirements have been satisfied, practical 
considerations also come into play whether in criminal or civil proceedings.  We 
understand that court staff members are trained in relation to equipment set-up (a part of 
which is obviously guided by any procedural or statutory requirements).  Where the 
equipment in use is portable, the configuration of the rooms involved may change from 
time to time and the positioning of cameras may also vary.  A typical requirement is to 
ensure that the person appearing remotely has no distinct advantage over participants in 
the courtroom (e.g. by being able to read material on the bench, or at the clerk’s or 
counsel’s table).  
8. 
Assistive devices for persons with disabilities 
Assistive devices for persons with disabilities are available in (or in connection with the 
services of) a number of Canadian courts.  In addition to adjustable equipment such as 
desks and lecterns, these include: 
1.  FM and infrared listening devices (e.g. Ontario);
164
2.  use of teletypewriter (TTY) equipment and software and Braille printers (e.g. 
Ontario);
165
3.  use of text reader technology and using proportionality on websites to allow for 
magnification and shrinkage of text (e.g. Ontario,
166
Supreme Court of Canada,
167
Federal Court of Canada
168
); 
4.  use of client-side cascading style sheet files to permit website users to configure 
visual elements to meet accessibility needs (e.g. Supreme Court of Canada
169
); 
and 
5.  efiling requirements specifying use of PDFs to ensure translatability into Braille 
(e.g. Supreme Court of Canada). 
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
19 
D. 
Electronic Case Administration and Management 
1. 
Case management systems 
Our research indicates that electronic case management systems are at various stages of 
study, development, piloting and use in numerous courts across Canada, including: 
1.  Supreme Court of Canada – the current Case Management System is slated to be 
overhauled, with an enterprise architecture planned to permit an e-filing portal 
planned for the future, as well as an Electronic Records Management System;
170
2.  Federal Court – a 2-year plan is underway to upgrade aging IT equipment and 
strengthen information security in order to pave the way for development of a 
Court Records Management System, and digital audio recording.
171
3.  Alberta Provincial Court – the Court Case Management Program, led by judges, 
is intended to better manage cases in the Edmonton and Calgary adult provincial 
criminal court system.  Components of that Program are technology-based.  Phase 
I of the program extended from February 2010-November 2011 and involved a 
related initiative in the Criminal Justice Division called “crown file ownership”, 
which assigned a file to one prosecutor “cradle-to-grave” to allow for tracking. 
Phase I included introduction of a remote courtroom scheduling system (RCS), 
allowing registered users to book matters online at 
http://www.albertacourts.ca/ProvincialCourt/CourtCaseManagement/RemoteCour
troomScheduling/tabid/351/Default.aspx.  Phase II of the Program ran from July 
2010-March 2011 and involved migration of the Prosecutor Information System 
Manager (PRISM), creating a User Portal and deactivating the subpoenas and 
scheduling sub-system of the old scheduling system Justice Online Information 
Network and expansion of the RCS to courts in Wetaskiwin and Okotoks.  The 
case management system operates on Microsoft’s Dynamics Customer 
Relationship Management System and a key goal appears to be establishing a 
“single source of truth” for provincial court scheduling.
172
The close-out report 
for Phase I identified a number of successes, but also areas for improvement, 
including:  creation of more realistic time lines for IT aspects of delivery, 
importance of creating up-front awareness and early staff training around related 
processes, need for sensitivity to the potential limitations of videoconference 
meetings to address “the people side of change”, and the importance of procuring 
involvement of external stakeholders (including compensation or honoraria for 
participating).
173
4.  British Columbia Provincial Court and Superior Court – JUSTIN is the BC 
Justice information system developed by Sierra Systems.
174
It provides “a single 
integrated database comprising almost every aspect of a criminal case, including:  
police reports to Crown counsel, Crown case assessment and approval, Crown 
victim and witness notification, court scheduling, recording results, document 
production and trial scheduling.”
175
The system, among other things, allows law 
enforcement real time access to an accused’s criminal court file history, real time 
access to court scheduling information, requires data entry only once and then is 
available to all authorized users, can produce standard format documents and 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested