view pdf winform c# : Add links to pdf online control SDK platform web page winforms azure web browser WP002_CanadaDigitizationOfCourtProcesses201210232-part1448

23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
20 
reports, and features security and audit trails allowing tracking of changes and 
deletions of data.
176
It is accessible only to authorized users from groups such as 
law enforcement, crown’s offices, etc.  Integrated Courts Electronic Documents 
(ICED) links JUSTIN with the Sheriff Custody Management System (SCMS), the 
Corrections Offender Management System (CORNET) and allows for e-faxing 
between justice partners who are unable to link directly to the case management 
system.  ICED uses an ORACLE database to store PDFs, Web Methods for 
workflow, uses i-keys with Entrust Software for digital signatures and 
authentication and signature pads to get the electronic signature of an accused.
177
Case management of information in civil cases relies on the Civil Electronic 
Information System (CEIS), which appears to be an Oracle forms application.
178
5.  British Columbia Court of Appeal – WebCATS is a web-based tracking, 
scheduling and management system developed for the Court by OpenRoad.  The 
system is built on Microsoft.NET technology that allows for case tracking, 
scheduling and an interface to the Court’s Digital Audio Recording System 
(DARS).  Data previously held in the Court’s DOS-based system CATS was 
migrated over to the new system after 2004.
179
The goal is for all necessary 
documents (including reserve and oral judgments on file) to be part of the 
WebCATS system, and the system also allows for generation of monthly 
statistical reports on completion of cases (using an Excel spreadsheet).
180
As 
discussed below, an efiling feature is currently be implemented by the Court.  
6.  Manitoba – the Cooperative Justice Initiative goal in 2008-2009 was the 
integration of the Provincial Court system (CCAIN), the prosecution and victims 
services system (PRISM) and the corrections offender management system 
(COMS) to better enable information exchange between the Ministry of Justice 
and partner agencies such as police.
181
7.  Newfoundland – in 2009, the TRIM system was implemented in the St. John’s 
Office, allowing for electronic retrieval of files, electronic disclosure and part of 
an eScheduling initiative launched for the Provincial Court.
182
8.  Nova Scotia – the Justice Enterprise Integration Network was completed in 2005, 
providing support for court services, correctional services, victim services and 
other players including policing agencies and prosecutors.  The system allows for 
offender tracking, court case management, corrections case management and fines 
recording and processing.  The system is also linked to the Canadian Centre for 
Justice Statistics (to input NS-based crime statistics).
183
9.  Nunavut – in 2005 reported fully implemented automated systems for the civil 
registry (known as the Court Information System) and an Integrated Court 
Services Information System relating to adult and youth criminal cases.
184
10. Ontario – as of 2009, the Ministry of the Attorney General proposed a Court 
Information Management System (CIMS) that would integrate the three existing 
systems:  Integrated Court Offences Network (ICON) for criminal cases, FRANK 
for civil cases, as well as the Estates Case Management System, while also 
enhancing functionality by allowing for e-document management, court 
scheduling, financial and automated workflow capabilities and enable the 
introduction of online services.  The first version of CIMS was expected in the 
spring of 2012.
185
Several phases have been involved, including:  (i) converting 
Add links to pdf online - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
Add links to pdf online - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add email link to pdf; add a link to a pdf file
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
21 
all courts in the province to either ICON or Frank; (ii) creation of ICON v. 2.2 to 
enhance web useability, streamline workflow processes and ensure municipal 
bylaw ticketing could be uploaded into the system;
186
and (iii) reconfiguration of 
FRANK to accommodate family and civil justice reform initiatives and make it 
searchable from all court locations province-wide and generate detailed reports 
for criminal and family cases linked with civil cases.
187
The Estates Case 
Management System, used in 49 Superior Court locations, is web-enabled and 
allows staff to enter and retrieve local estates data.  A public access module was 
tested in Toronto, and the trial of an associated efiling system was 
discontinued.
188
11. Quebec – an IT project called the Integrated Justice Information System (IJIS) 
was outlined as early as 2003, with the goal to connect different stakeholders in 
justice, public security, health, social services, the police, crowns and the public.  
The system was oriented toward criminal, penal, civil and youth matters, with 
trials to be in place in Outaouais for criminal matters by March 2013, and a stage 
2 roll out for civil matters planned for March 2014, but was cancelled in early 
2012.
189
12. Saskatchewan – the Criminal Justice Information Management System (CJIMS) 
has been initiated by the Attorney General, Corrections, Public Safety and Policy 
and the Information Technology Office.  It is intended to create an integrated case 
management system for criminal matters and replace existing legal systems 
(including the Corrections Management Information System).  Implementation is 
targeted for 2013.
190
The Court of Appeal implemented a new case 
management/document management and efiling system in 2011, referred to as 
eCourt (which also allows others to search court files for a fee).
191
2. 
Electronic filing 
The Canadian Centre for Court Technology (CCCT) has compiled a series of “E-Filing 
Case Studies”, which is, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive and current analysis 
of this issue in Canada.  The CCCT study provides detailed case-by-case information 
relating to the Federal Court, the Tax Court of Canada, the BCSC & Provincial Court, the 
BCCA, the Alberta CA, the Saskatchewan CA, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice and 
the Competition Tribunal (a federal administrative body) including the technologies 
involved, the costs, the key documentation and the “takeaways”.
192
Here, we intend only 
to highlight certain aspects of that comprehensive ongoing research and to supplement it 
with any additional information gleaned during our online search processes, as follows: 
1.  Supreme Court of Canada – since 2008, the Court has required that all parties 
file electronic copies of their materials, but the filing is completed through 
deposit of a CD ROM, although facilitation of the e-filing process is a stated 
objective for the Court under the Court Modernization Project.
193
2.  Federal Court of Canada – since 2005, litigants may file documents 
electronically through the court approved e-filing provider Lexis-Nexis 
Canada, with documents in PDF and graphic file attachments in PDF or TIFF.  
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
HTML converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to Add necessary references
chrome pdf from link; add hyperlink in pdf
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add, edit, delete links. Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically.
adding a link to a pdf in preview; pdf link to attached file
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
22 
In certain circumstances, paper copies of documents (eg documents over 500 
pages) must also be filed;
194
3.  Tax Court of Canada – litigants are encouraged to file documents 
electronically (including notices of appeal, applications for extending time to 
file notices of appeal and other documents) and are able to do so using an e-
filing system directly accessible on the Court’s website, which was developed 
in 2001 in connection with creation of a new case management system;
195 
4.  British Columbia Supreme Court and Provincial Court – since full 
implementation in 2009, litigants may file most Supreme Court and Provincial 
Court documents in PDF form (using electronic signatures) after they have 
registered for an account with Court Services Online (CSO).
196
CSO is a 
JAVA application, whereas the customized case management system used in 
conjunction with efiling is built in ORACLE forms using an ORACLE 
database.  An online payment system for associated fees is available.  The 
project cost approximately $5 million (including numerous expenses in 
addition to systems development costs).  This is part of a broader based 
strategic goal of the BC government to provide e-services to the public.
197
5.  British Columbia Court of Appeal – since its “unofficial” implementation in 
summer 2011, litigants may file documents electronically using CSO 
(originally developed as a BCSC and BC Prov Ct project and enhanced at a 
cost of about $75,000).  The “backend” of the BCCA efiling system is a 
customized case management system called WebCATS, which “is developed 
in JAVA, .NET against a SQL Server database.” Since September 2011, 
litigants have been required to file electronic versions of their facta and 
statements on CD ROM.
198
6.  Alberta Court of Appeal – as a result of a project initiated in 1998, litigants 
may file transcripts, facta and supporting materials online at 
https://www.albertacourts.ca/ca/efiling/, which requires registration before 
use.  From 2004 to 2007, facta and supporting materials for appeals from trials 
of ten days or longer were required to be efiled unless otherwise ordered.  As 
of 2007, however, efiling became optional for all appeals, although the court 
“strongly supports the e-appeal initiative”, since certain technological 
infrastructure needed to be put in place to support e-filing.  The project uses a 
custom-built application combining ASP.net and 1.1 on II2 6.0 with Windows 
2004 servers and an SQL Server 2000 database manages its content and cost 
approximately $30,000.
199
7.  Alberta Provincial Court – as of 2010, notices of application alleging a breach 
of the Charter and supporting material in Calgary Criminal, Calgary Regional 
and Edmonton Criminal Divisions may be e-filed by completion of a form 
available on the Court’s website.  Counsel are required to create an account on 
the Court’s website in order to enable e-filing.
200
Similarly, counsel who 
intend to apply for publication bans in the Criminal Division and Family & 
Youth Division may e-file notice of their intention to do so, thereby allowing 
them to provide notice to registered media outlets as required by a 2005 
Notice to the Profession.
201
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
adding links to pdf in preview; pdf email link
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness). C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C# Add necessary references
clickable links in pdf files; pdf reader link
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
23 
8.  Saskatchewan Court of Appeal – as part of a 4 phase eCourts project initiated 
in 2008 (to include e-filing, case management and document management 
functions), approved filers may now file all documents for civil and criminal 
appeals, as well as related chambers applications online at 
https://ecourt.sasklawcourts.ca/?q=faq#n245, which is accessible from the 
Court’s website.  A commercial product with web based e-filing, case and 
document management called eCourt was purchased at a cost of 
approximately $275,000 (including “requirements documentation by the 
outside consultant”) from Sustain Technologies Inc.  On-Base is used for the 
document management component of the system.
202
As of April 2012 efiling 
of court of appeal documents was made mandatory.
203
9.  Ontario Superior Court of Justice – two e-filing projects (Toronto E-file and 
Ontario E-File) were piloted, but suspended in 2002.  The Ontario Court 
Services Division (as discussed in part III below) is planning a modernization 
initiative called the Court Information Management System (CIMS), which 
will enable management of incoming and outgoing documents, including e-
filing, with a first version of CIMS targeted for 2012.
204
10. Newfoundland Provincial Court – since approximately 2009, registered users 
of the Judicial Enforcement Registry system may file documents online at 
https://provincial.efile.court.nl.ca/.  The system operates on Adobe Reader and 
includes online fee payment, as well as for e-mail confirmation or rejection of 
filed documents.
205
11. Newfoundland Supreme Court – allows for registered users of the Judicial 
Enforcement Registry system to file documents relating to wills, estates, and 
guardianship online at https://supreme.efile.court.nl.ca/, which also allows for 
registered users to search the registries for a fee.
206
The Ontario Court of Appeal, Nunavut Court of Justice, New Brunswick Court of 
Appeal, and Prince Edward Island Supreme Court Appellate Division, allow for a form of 
“e-filing” through attaching PDF documents to e-mails sent to a specified address.
207
3. 
Electronic docketing & scheduling 
In many cases, as noted above, docketing and scheduling functions are components of 
integrated information management systems that are either in effect or under 
consideration in a number of jurisdictions in Canada.  In addition, our research has 
revealed the following e-scheduling systems: 
1.  Manitoba – an eJudicial Information Scheduling System was reportedly under 
development in 2009-2010;
208
2.  Newfoundland – an eScheduling Initiative was launched in provincial court in 
2009;
209
3.  Nova Scotia – eScheduling software was first introduced in Halifax 
courtrooms in 2005, with plans to roll it out to other courtrooms and staff;
210
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add page number to pdf hyperlink; change link in pdf file
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Management Using C#.NET Imaging
more detailed C# tutorials on each part by following the links respectively are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change link in pdf; pdf link
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
24 
4.  Ontario – a pilot project that allowed parties on the Estates and Commercial 
Lists in Toronto to schedule dates for appearances online using OSCAR 
(developed by CourtCanada Limited) was discontinued in 2010;
211
and 
5.  Saskatchewan – Ministry of Justice oversaw development and testing of an 
automated system for scheduling in 2010-2011, with options to be evaluated 
in 2011-2012.
212
E. 
Courtroom technology 
More than one Canadian jurisdiction credits itself with having an “eCourtroom” and/or 
having run “eTrials”.  Although these kinds of claims typically relate to the inclusion in 
the courtroom of certain kinds of technologies, no two “eCourtrooms” appear to be 
exactly alike.  Our research turned up examples of technologized courtrooms in the 
following jurisdictions: 
1.  Alberta – in 2010, the Alberta Supreme Court held its first “e-trial”, which the 
Court identified as involving these sorts of features: the majority of documents 
filed on DVDs, CDs, and flash drives rather than paper with search engines such 
as Summation Software used to retrieve and display the exhibits; multi-page 
experts’ spreadsheets viewed electronically; judges able to attach their own 
comments and notes on electronic exhibits; and judges able to access the record 
from their laptops afterward for the purposes of judgment writing.
213
e-Trials take 
place in courtrooms where evidence is managed, presented and stored 
electronically in an “eCourt”, with the system designed to manage transcripts 
(including real time transcription, historic timelines, edited transcripts, realtime 
streaming to remote locations); manage evidence (repository of records and multi-
media based evidence stored using images and native file formats imported from 
participants, marking as exhibit or for identification, court operator controlled 
broadcast channel allowing for public view); manage associated materials (eg 
pleadings, witness statements, audio, video, realtime audiovisual streaming); and 
integrate external resources (links to court’s website, internet website for research, 
court’s additional core systems (eg case management)).
214
Alberta switched to 
DARS in 2001.
215
2.  British Columbia – the Attorney General, and all levels of court are involved in a 
joint eCourt Project, with the goal of providing for seamless coordination from e-
documents created in law offices to the registry to the judicial desktop and the 
courtroom, which would include eCourtrooms that have a complete e-court file, 
an integrated DARS that allows for real time monitoring of the courtroom in the 
Registry, e-exhibit management, and links to the civil and criminal court 
information systems (CEIS and JUSTIN).
216
The BCSC held its first fully 
electronic proceeding in 2011, a case in which all of the evidence was 
documentary, as part of a pilot project in which a series of ehearings will be held 
in a number of different kinds of proceedings, including those with witness 
testimony.
217
BC converted to DARS in 2006.
218
As the host jurisdiction for the 
Air India trials, BC developed the beginnings of an eCourt infrastructure by 2005, 
with a courtroom including:  a video display network with 25 screens, secure 
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
adding hyperlinks to pdf; c# read pdf from url
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
accessible links in pdf; add url to pdf
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
25 
network connections for counsel, hyperlinking of e-exhibits to an e-exhibits list, 
touch sensitive LCD monitors allowing witnesses to manipulate digital images in 
order to augment their testimony.
219
3.  Nova Scotia – By 2005, law courts in Halifax featured an “Elmo” video system to 
allow for enlargement and projection of physical evidence, audio systems 
designed to amplify testimony for the jury, and DARS.
220
4.  Ontario – Although the AG conducted a 2008 study of mature in-court 
technologies used in other jurisdictions, adoption of the technology in Ontario 
courtrooms has taken longer than planned.
221
However, videoconferencing 
technologies, vulnerable witness testimonial aids and digital evidence display 
technologies are being expanded.  Additionally, Ontario claims to have one of the 
largest high-speed videoconferencing networks in the world.
222
Two “e-
courtrooms” are located in Toronto, featuring videoconference monitors on the 
dais, witness stand, counsel tables, as well as the clerk and registrar’s desks, with 
intended upgrades to plasma screens for jury viewing and a document project 
camera planned for 2009-2010.
223
Ontario’s first fully electronic trial was 
reported in 2000, which included thousands of exhibits on CD, displayed to jurors 
through “strategically placed computers and monitors”.
224
Ontario courtrooms 
began converting to DARS in 2008.
225
F. 
Other systems 
Our online research also revealed a number of other types of technological systems that 
did not fit neatly into the preceding categories.  These included: 
1.  automated Maintenance Information Management and Enforcement Systems 
for support orders in family proceedings (e.g. Alberta,
226
Manitoba,
227
Northwest Territories,
228
Nova Scotia,
229
PEI,
230
and Saskatchewan
231
); 
2.  automated production of family court orders during maintenance enforcement 
proceedings in order to limit delay (e.g. Manitoba
232
); 
3.  online fine payment portals (e.g. Alberta,
233
Nova Scotia,
234
Saskatchewan
235
); 
and 
4.  automated jury management systems allowing for, inter alia, random 
selection for jury notices, and online responses by citizens receiving jury 
notices (e.g. BC ,
236
Ontario
237
). 
IV.  CASE MANAGEMENT CASE STUDIES:  ONTARIO AND BC  
In many ways, both BC and Ontario have been leaders with respect to the implementation 
of technology.  However, the two jurisdictions have had very different experiences and 
levels of success in terms of the implementation of case management systems.  Here I 
will set out some of the key facts available on the public record with respect to the 
development and implementation of case management systems in each jurisdiction.  
These two very different factual records seem to raise interesting questions about what it 
takes to make digitization of court processes successful, including how to define 
“success”, the importance of clearly identifying the “problem” that technology is meant 
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
26 
to assist in addressing and the related human processes through which problem definition 
and measurement of success are determined. 
A. 
Ontario 
In 1996 the Ontario Ministries of the Attorney General and Public Safety and Security 
initiated the Integrated Justice Project (IJP) with the objective of improving “the 
information flow in the [criminal] justice system by streamlining existing processes and 
replacing older computer systems and paper-based information exchanges with new, 
compatible systems and technologies” and creating a Common Inquiry System “to allow 
authorized persons in one justice area to access and thus link to files held in other areas 
on cases, victims, witnesses, suspects and convicted offenders”.
238
The IJP was expected 
to affect 22,000 government employees at 825 different locations in Ontario, in addition 
to police forces, judges, lawyers and the general public.  The IJP used a “Common 
Purpose Procurement” process under which the government and a private sector 
consortium led by EDS Canada Incorporated (EDS) would both provide human and 
financial resources, sharing in “resulting risks and rewards”.
239
Unfortunately, the IJP was terminated in 2002 due to “significant cost increases and 
delays”, with the estimated cost of completion starting at $180 million in 1998, and rising 
to $359 million in 2001, while expected benefits in the same period declined from $326 
million to $238 million and it was recognized that not all systems would be implemented 
by August 2002 as projected.
240
The Ontario Auditor General stated that the original 
business case upon which approval had been based had an “aggressive schedule based on 
a best-case scenario”, failed to recognize the “magnitude of change introduced by the 
Project, the complexity of justice administration … or the ability of the vendors [to 
deliver the computer systems on time].”
241
Further, project management and senior court 
management had never agreed upon whether the expected court benefits (70% of the 
overall projected benefits) were actually realizable.
242
Other problems identified by the 
Auditor General included that the billing rates by consortium staff were three times those 
charged by the Ministries’ staff “for similar work”, and security systems were weak so 
that access to confidential data about “suspects, victims, witnesses” etc. “was vulnerable 
to unauthorized access”.
243
As a result, the Auditor General issued a series of recommendations for improvement in 
2002, but the government and the private consortium were ultimately unable to renew 
their agreement and the work term for the project expired, at which time the IJP was 
unfinished and the government had invested $265 million, while realizing only a $9.6 
million benefit.  By that time, only the Computer-aided Dispatch and Records 
Management systems for the police and the Offender Tracking Information System for 
corrections had been implemented.  The Digital Audio Recording, E-file and Civil and 
Criminal Case Management System was incomplete and would not be completed as 
originally planned, and the Common Inquiry System was never achieved.
244
EDS 
ultimately sued the government.  The case was reportedly settled by a government 
payment of $63 million.  As then Attorney General David Young said, “we spent a lot of 
money and had very little to show for it.”
245
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
27 
By 2007, the Ministry of the Attorney General had taken a different approach and 
focused on development of a court scheduling and reservation system called Online 
System for Court Attendance Reservations (OSCAR), which it hired the private 
contractor Court Canada to develop.  However, the program was shut down in 2010, 
resulting in a $14.5 million lawsuit being filed against the Ministry.
246
Although online 
reservation of estates matters is still referred to in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice’s 
estates list practice directions, linking to OSCAR from the CourtCanada website 
produces an error message.
247
In the interim, in 2008, the Ministry announced that it has been studying mature IT 
systems relating to videoconferencing and digitized evidence display technologies in 
other jurisdictions and had determined that no single vendor could replace Ontario’s 
existing criminal, civil, estates and family applications with a single unified court 
information management system.
248
As a result, it decided to pursue a route that would 
involve integration of existing legacy systems (ICON, FRANK and Estates) through a 
Court Information Management System (CIMS) that would allow for enhanced functions 
such as e-document management, court scheduling, financial and automated workflow 
capabilities and the introduction of online services to the public.
249
The Ministry 
approved $10 million in funding in 2009 to create CIMS and the first version of the 
system was forecast for release in spring 2012.
250
As discussed above with respect to case management systems, steps have been taken to 
implement CIMS, including:  converting all courts to ICON and FRANK, updating ICON 
for enhanced web capability, and updating FRANK to reflect amendments to the Rules of 
Civil Procedure, allow for searches at courts province-wide and for production of detailed 
reports.
251
In all, it has been estimated that over a 15 year period, the Ontario 
government has spent almost $350 million to implement changes to case management 
systems to allow web-enabled access to material and online services.
252
In 2008, the Ministry of the Attorney General for Ontario launched the Justice on Target 
(JOT) strategy, which was intended to, among other things, reduce by 30% “the 
provincial average number of days and appearances it takes to complete a criminal case” 
over a four year period.
253
Numerous related initiatives have been undertaken, including:  
making first appearances more meaningful by providing accused persons with more 
information earlier to assist them in decision making; dedicated prosecution to allow 
Crowns to better monitor cases; enhanced video-conferencing (including for pleas, as 
well as to facilitate secure consultations between defence counsel and in-custody clients); 
and on-site Legal Aid applications.
254
Statistics from 1 January 2011 to 31 December 
2011 show a 1.3% reduction in the average number of days needed to complete a 
criminal charge since 2007.
255
The Ontario experience has been publicly contrasted with the comparatively low-cost 
success of web-enabled court management systems in British Columbia. 
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
28 
B. 
British Columbia 
By comparison with Ontario’s trajectory in terms of case management systems allowing 
for integration and public access, BC’s trajectory has been rather straight-forward.  In 
2001, JUSTIN became operational, allowing for the management of information relating 
to criminal cases.  In 2003, CEIS became operational, allowing for the management of 
information relating to civil, family and estates cases.  In 2004, e-search technology was 
implemented, allowing for, among other things, public searches of publicly accessible 
information relating to criminal and civil (not family) matters.  In 2005, e-filing for civil 
matters (excluding family matters) became operational, allowing, among other things for 
the public to both file materials online, as well as to conduct searches of publicly 
accessible case-related information.  In 2009, ICED was implemented, allowing for 
integration of JUSTIN with legacy systems in partner agencies, including the police and 
corrections. 
By April 2011, e-filing had been fully implemented for small claims matters, family and 
civil matters in the BCSC and for appeals in the BCCA.  Further, a fully electronic court 
file existed for small claims matters and civil matters in the BCSC.  Implementation of e-
filing was in progress for family and criminal matters in the Provincial Court and for 
criminal matters in BCSC.  Implementation of a fully electronic court file was in progress 
for family and criminal matters in Provincial Court and for family and criminal matters in 
the BCSC.  Fully operational e-filing and electronic court files are to be implemented in 
all family, small claims, and criminal matters, as well as appeals in Provincial Court, the 
BCSC and BCCA by April 2013.
256
It is estimated that the cost of integrating all registries into a single database, which was 
the first phase of taking civil court services online cost approximately $3 million.
257
The BC Attorney General has recently announced its continuing support for the use of 
video and teleconferencing as well as the eCourt initiative.  However, it has also noted 
that although expenditures on adult criminal justice personnel and processes have 
increased by 35% over 6 years, delays have increased, the number of persons in-custody 
awaiting trial has increased and the number of cases it takes more than 3 or more days to 
resolve is growing, and the number of cases and crimes dealt with have decreased.
258
It 
has resolved to attend to this “paradox” through investigation and issuance of a White 
Paper in September 2012. 
C. 
Questions arising 
This relatively superficial review of some of the key facts relating to case management 
technologies and web-enabled access to the information in case management databases in 
Ontario and BC obviously raises areas for further research and questions, including: 
1.  Is there anything about the relative size and/or complexity of the justice systems  
and/or case loads in Ontario and BC that make a direct comparison 
difficult/impossible/unfair? 
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
29 
2.  What sorts of processes were followed in each jurisdiction in order to plan and 
implement case management in order to take services online? 
3.  What sorts of research about existing systems in other jurisdictions was done?  
Was it incorporated into planning and implementation?  If so, how so? 
4.  Does the implementation of digitized case management systems reduce delay?  If 
so, how?  If not, why not? 
CONCLUSION 
Our online research on the digitization of court processes in Canada identified examples 
of many types of technologies at various stages of development and implementation in 
jurisdictions across Canada.  In so doing, it also raised a number of additional areas for 
future research and inquiry: 
1.  Is further data collection about exactly which kinds of technologies are being 
implemented in Canada necessary/advisable?  If so, should it be focused on 
particular jurisdictions and/or particular technologies?  Which ones?  What kinds 
of questions need to be asked?  In light of that, should qualitative and/or 
quantitative methodologies be used? 
2.  What specifically would it help to know about successful vs. unsuccessful 
strategies for implementation of technology? (e.g. how were the purposes of the 
implemented technology defined? How is the performance being measured?  For 
purposes whose outcomes are not easily measured quantitatively, what should the 
measures of performance be?  Should data be collected from members of 
stakeholder groups beyond the courts and courts administration? (e.g. from 
indigenous communities whose access to justice was intended to be improved 
through use of remote appearance technologies?)) 
3.  Can the implementation of technologies be used to assist in alleviating access to 
justice concerns?  If so, which ones?  Could technologies have unintended access 
to justice consequences, both negative and positive?  If so, what might those 
consequences be? 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested