view pdf winform c# : Add url pdf SDK Library service wpf .net asp.net dnn WP002_CanadaDigitizationOfCourtProcesses201210233-part1449

23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
30 
APPENDIX “A” 
KEY STEPS IN CIVIL AND CRIMINAL LITIGATION IN CANADA
259
I. 
CIVIL LITIGATION 
Civil litigation can involve law suits between natural persons, corporations, government 
and government agencies that do not include prosecution of charges under the Criminal 
Code, but may involve matters such as property or contract disputes, family matters and 
tort claims.  Family law and child protection matters tend to involve specialized 
processes.  The table below sets out some of the typical key steps in basic civil litigation, 
together with suggestions about the sorts of related functions with which technologies 
might be engaged to assist: 
STEP 
POTENTIAL TECHNOLOGIZED FUNCTIONS 
PRETRIAL 
1.  Initiating the proceeding – one party 
(plaintiff) initiates the process by having a 
proceeding issued by a court (at this stage, 
a court file is created). 
- help people to transmit their pleading to the 
other party (eg e-mail); help confirm if/when 
pleadings have been received 
Technologies that allow the court to: 
- store the pleadings and other documents filed by 
the parties  
- access the materials on demand (possibly 
including court staff, judges, etc) 
- organize and cross-reference the materials 
- record key dates, deadlines, location etc. 
(calendar) 
- possibly allow public access to some or all of 
the materials filed, or just to access “case 
information” that indicates key dates (eg filing 
deadlines, upcoming hearings, etc.), whether a 
judge has been assigned to hear the case or part of 
the case, etc. 
- search its files overall to create statistical 
profiles of how long cases take to get to trial, how 
many cases a court handled in a given period, and 
other such data 
(eg databases of some sort) 
2.  Serving and filing the pleadings – plaintiff 
serves the process on the other party 
(defendant).  Defendant serves its written 
responding pleading on the plaintiff and 
files it with the court.  (If the defendant 
fails to do this within the time provided 
for, the plaintiff may be entitled to default 
- allow people to transmit their pleading to the 
court and allow the court to receive that pleading 
and store it (eg e-mail or specific online 
repository) 
Technologies that allow the court to: 
- store the pleadings and other documents filed by 
the parties  
Add url pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf links; add hyperlinks to pdf
Add url pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlink in pdf; add url pdf
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
31 
judgment without further notice to the 
defendant).  The plaintiff may be afforded 
the chance to serve a reply pleading on the 
defendant and file it with the court. 
- access the materials on demand (possibly 
including court staff, judges, etc) 
- organize and cross-reference the materials 
- record key dates, deadlines, location etc. 
(calendar) 
- possibly allow public access to some or all of 
the materials filed, or just to access “case 
information” that indicates key dates (eg filing 
deadlines, upcoming hearings, etc.), whether a 
judge has been assigned to hear the case or part of 
the case, etc. 
- search its files overall to create statistical 
profiles of how long cases take to get to trial, how 
many cases a court handled in a given period, and 
other such data 
(eg databases of some sort) 
3.  Documentary discovery – the parties 
exchange lists of relevant documents with 
each other and allow one another to 
inspect the listed documents (except those 
that are privileged).  Documents can 
include not just papers, but also electronic 
information, videos, etc. 
Technologies that allow the parties to: 
- scan, organize lists of documents, identify 
documents that are privileged and so will not be 
produced as well as documents that are not 
privileged and so will be produced, store, search 
documents 
- transmit documents to the other side or give the 
other side access to the documents being 
produced 
(eg searchable databases of some sort and 
possible some sort of network allowing multiple 
people to access and work on the documents 
simultaneously) 
4.  Examination for discovery – each party 
gets the opportunity to examine a 
representative of the other party (and 
sometimes other persons) under oath or 
affirmation, in the presence of a reporter 
who will typically record the 
examinations, and later prepare transcripts 
of them. 
Technologies that allow the parties to: 
- record the examination 
- prepare transcripts that are searchable and 
accessible 
- create a record of any documents that might be 
identified or referred to during the examination 
(usually marked as “exhibits” to the examination) 
5.  Pre-trial motions/pre-trial meetings – the 
parties may have to seek dates from the 
court in order to go before a judge or 
master to have them assist in resolving a 
dispute between them about the litigation 
(e.g. a refusal to answer a certain question 
in examination for discovery), or they 
may be required to meet with a judge or 
master for a case management or 
Technologies that allow the court to: 
- store filed materials like motion records (eg 
including affidavits, written arguments, copies of 
case law, etc) as part of an overall case file (see 
above) 
- access the materials on demand (perhaps even to 
view them while the parties are in court making 
their arguments) 
- organize the materials by inserting dates, etc. 
C#: How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) in HTML5 Viewer
License and Price. File Formats. PDF. Word. Excel. PowerPoint. Tiff. DNN (Dotnetnuke). Quick to Start. Add a Viewer Control on Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP).
add links to pdf in preview; add link to pdf acrobat
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
addTab(_tabRedact); //add Tab "Sample new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.addCSS( new customStyle({ background: "url('RasterEdge_Resource_Files/images
pdf link to email; add hyperlink to pdf online
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
32 
settlement conference (which can involve 
the filing of a pre-trial report).  (The 
parties may also have to attend an out-of-
court ADR session prior to trial.) 
(eg databases or some sort, but also technology 
that allows the materials to be viewed by court 
staff and judges, possibly even in court or in a 
judge’s office depending where a meeting 
happens) 
- allow the parties and/or witnesses to “appear” in 
ways other than in person (eg videoconferencing, 
teleconferencing, pre-recorded evidence) 
- allow the judge to record notes 
6.  Pre-trial motions/hearings judgments 
issued or case notes prepared – the judge 
or master who hears a pre-trial motion or 
presides over a pre-trial settlement or case 
management conference may formally 
issue a judgment and/or make a note on 
the file in relation to the appearance.  
(Note that these judgments may also be 
subject to appeal, and parties may either 
be entitled to appeal “as of right” or first 
have to apply for leave to appeal.) 
- allow the judge to write reasons for judgment, 
transmit the reasons for judgment to the parties 
when they are finalized and possibly to post those 
reasons for judgment online to make them 
publicly accessible and typically searchable 
(either through the court’s own website or through 
another online provider like QuickLaw) 
7.  Scheduling the trial – typically the case 
has to be “set down” for trial, which 
involves filing a trial record and will 
trigger a requirement to get a date for the 
trial of the matter from the court 
(sometimes by way of an appearance) and 
a trial date is set. 
- allow the parties to file material electronically, 
set dates electronically, appear remotely 
- allow the court to receive material in electronic 
form, add it to an electronic record, set dates and 
assign judges and courtrooms electronically 
TRIAL 
8.  Hearing – parties go to trial where they 
produce documents, examine and cross-
examine live witnesses, submit written 
arguments, provide copies of case law, 
etc. in order to support their case.  (The 
plaintiff bears the burden of proof on the 
balance of probabilities.)  The proceeding 
is recorded in some fashion, so that the 
parties may later order production of a 
transcript of the trial proceedings.  
Documents and other artifacts that are 
admitted into evidence become “exhibits” 
at trial, which are maintained by the court. 
Technologies that allow the court to: 
- store materials filed by the parties (usually just 
some of the documents referred to in step 6 
above) 
- access the materials on demand (perhaps even to 
view them while the parties are in court making 
their arguments) 
- organize materials, eg by officially marking 
them as exhibits (typically numbered in the order 
in which they are filed) 
- allow the parties and/or witnesses to “appear” in 
ways other than in person (eg videoconferencing, 
teleconferencing, pre-recorded evidence) 
- allow the judge to record notes 
9.  Trial judgment issued – the trial judge 
issues reasons for judgment, which are 
transmitted to the parties when finalized 
and (in most cases) posted online (on the 
- allow the judge to write reasons for judgment, 
transmit the reasons for judgment to the parties 
when they are finalized and possibly to post those 
reasons for judgment online to make them 
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
pdf hyperlinks; adding an email link to a pdf
C# Image: How to Download Image from URL in C# Project with .NET
Add this imaging library to your C#.NET project jpeg / jpg, or bmp image from a URL to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add links to pdf online; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
33 
court’s own website and/or through 
another online legal reporting service like 
QuickLaw or CanLII). 
publicly accessible and typically searchable 
(either through the court’s own website or through 
another online provider like QuickLaw) 
APPEAL
260
(to an appellate court) 
10. Filing notice of appeal - parties may 
appeal the trial judgment by serving and 
filing a notice of appeal on the opposing 
parties. 
Technologies that allow: 
- a party to serve its opponents with & file notices 
of appeal (that set out the reasons for the appeal) 
- parties to file materials with the appellate court 
(eg written arguments, copies of cases, etc) 
11. Appeal file created – the appellate court 
creates a file for the appeal in which all 
subsequently filed documents will be 
maintained. 
Technologies that allow the court to: 
- create a court file possibly to allow public access 
to the materials in it, but certainly to allow court 
staff and judges to have access to the materials in 
it 
- make the information about the status of a file 
and/or the contents of a file accessible to the 
public 
- access documents and other filed material during 
hearings 
12. Preliminary motions/pre-appeal hearing 
meetings – the parties appear before a 
judge with respect to preliminary matters 
relating to the appeal (e.g. to resolve 
disagreements on the content of the appeal 
record, etc.). 
Technologies that allow: 
- parties to make submissions or appearances 
before the court without having to be physically 
present 
- the court to record and broadcast the hearing and 
even to archive it (eg on court’s website) 
13. Pre-appeal hearing motions/conference 
judgments issued or case notes prepared - 
the judge who hears a pre-appeal hearing 
motion or presides over pre-appeal 
hearing conference may formally issue a 
judgment and/or make a note on the file in 
relation to the appearance. 
Technologies that allow: 
- parties to make submissions or appearances 
before the court without having to be physically 
present 
- the judge(s) to write reasons for judgment, 
possibly to transmit drafts of the reasons to their 
co-judges on the case before the reasons are 
finalized, transmit the finalized reasons for 
judgment to the parties and possibly to post those 
reasons for judgment online to make them 
publicly accessible and typically searchable 
(either through the court’s own website or through 
another online provider like QuickLaw) 
14. Filing of appeal record and responding 
materials – the appellant serves on the 
respondent and files with the court an 
appeal record (including transcripts, the 
trial judgment, etc.) and a factum (written 
argument), and the respondent serves any 
Technologies that allow: 
- parties to serve other parties electronically and 
file materials with the appellate court (eg written 
arguments, copies of cases, etc) 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
add hyperlinks to pdf; chrome pdf from link
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
add links to pdf document; clickable links in pdf files
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
34 
responding materials and a factum on the 
appellant and files that material with the 
court. 
15. Hearing – the parties appear before a 
judge or panel of judges to argue their 
cases.  Typically, no fresh evidence is 
presented and the parties are arguing 
based on the record as it was established 
through the documents filed and witness 
testimony at trial. 
Technologies that allow the court to: 
- store materials filed by the parties (including 
transcripts which can be very lengthy) 
- access the materials on demand (perhaps even to 
view them while the parties are in court making 
their arguments) 
- allow the parties and/or witnesses to “appear” in 
ways other than in person (eg videoconferencing, 
teleconferencing, pre-recorded evidence) 
- allow the judge(s) to record notes 
16. Appeal judgment issued – the appeal court 
issues reasons for judgment, which are 
transmitted to the parties when finalized 
and (in most cases) posted online (on the 
court’s own website and/or through 
another online legal reporting service like 
QuickLaw or CanLII). 
- allow the judge(s) to write reasons for judgment, 
transmit the reasons for judgment to the parties 
when they are finalized and possibly to post those 
reasons for judgment online to make them 
publicly accessible and typically searchable 
(either through the court’s own website or through 
another online provider like QuickLaw) 
ENFORCEMENT 
17. After all appeals are exhausted or the time 
for appeals has expired, judgments may be 
enforced, which can include filing 
judgments with the office of a local legal 
official (such as a sheriff), and/or 
involving that official directly in seizing 
property, etc. 
Technologies that allow: 
- a party to register judgments against the 
property of their opponent 
- legal officials (eg sheriffs) to access court 
records or files and enter judgments in their 
enforcement databases 
II. 
CRIMINAL LITIGATION 
Criminal litigation involves the prosecution of a natural person or corporation for a 
criminal offence, a process that is usually initiated by the state.  The table below sets out 
some of the typical key steps in prosecution of a criminal offence, together with 
suggestions about the sorts of related functions with which technologies might be 
engaged to assist: 
STEP 
POTENTIAL TECHNOLOGIZED FUNCTIONS 
PRE-CHARGE 
1.  Police investigation, including application 
for a search warrant (if necessary) – if a 
police officer wishes to conduct a search 
of the home (for example) of someone 
suspected of a crime, s/he can apply to a 
provincial court of limited jurisdiction to 
issue a search warrant.  If the police 
Technologies that allow: 
- police to create an electronic investigatory file 
- police to appear remotely before the judge or 
justice and to electronically file materials 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
add hyperlinks to pdf online; change link in pdf
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Download and Save Image from Web URL
Apart from image downloading from web URL, RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK still dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change link in pdf file; pdf hyperlink
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
35 
officer’s supporting materials establish 
that the necessary threshold for issuing the 
warrant has been satisfied, then the court 
will issue the warrant.  The police 
investigation will result in creation of a 
investigative file. 
2.  Police report to Crown counsel – if based 
on their investigation, the police believe 
that the matter warrants being forwarded 
to the Crown, the police send a report to 
Crown counsel.  Crown counsel examines 
the report and determines whether charges 
are warranted. 
Technologies that allow: 
- police to share their investigatory file 
electronically with the Crown 
- police and Crown to meet electronically if 
necessary 
CHARGE 
3.  Charge formally laid – if Crown counsel 
determines charges are warranted, the 
accused will be asked to come to the 
police station and/or may be arrested and 
formally charged.  The accused may be 
detained in custody, in which case they 
are entitled to a “bail hearing” within 24 
hours of arrest. 
Technologies that allow: 
- communication between the Crown and police, 
and the police and the suspect 
- production of a formal charging document 
- justice ministries to assign a Crown to a case, 
track respective Crown caseloads and the progress 
of each case from time of charge until its ultimate 
resolution 
POST-CHARGE 
4.  Bail hearing – the accused will be brought 
before a justice of the peace who will 
decide whether they are entitled to be 
released and, if so, on what terms.  Those 
denied bail typically remain in custody 
until their trial (which can be months or 
even years in coming). 
Technologies that allow: 
- electronic transmission of documents to the 
court 
- remote appearances by the accused person if 
necessary 
5.  Crown disclosure – the Crown is required 
to make full and ongoing disclosure to the 
accused (or their lawyer), including 
disclosure of the investigative file (subject 
to certain limited exceptions). 
Technologies that allow crown to: 
- scan, organize, search, make digitally accessible 
and transmit documents, witness statements, 
expert reports, the investigatory report of police, 
etc. to accused or her lawyer (not sure how it 
works with physical evidence (eg gun)  but this 
would also be an issue) 
6.  Pretrial proceedings – the Crown and 
accused’s counsel may appear before the 
court prior to trial for any number of 
reasons, including:  (i) for the purpose of 
allowing the accused plead guilty and 
have sentence adjudicated (obviating the 
need for a trial); (ii) to plead not guilty 
and either set a date for trial, or if charged 
with an indictable offence to elect whether 
Technologies that allow the court to: 
- store and access Crown and accused’s 
submissions, written arguments, etc. 
- record and organize dates for matters to proceed 
- see and hear from witnesses, accused and/or 
counsel who are in remote locations (eg 
teleconferences, videoconferences) (for accused 
persons who are in custody pending trial, this 
sometimes means appearing by videoconference 
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
36 
to be tried by a provincial court judge, a 
judge of the provincial superior court or a 
judge of the superior court and a jury; and 
(iii) for a “preliminary hearing” before a 
judge to see if there is enough evidence to 
warrant sending the matter on for trial 
(only for certain of the most serious 
indictable offences). 
from the detention facility) 
7.  Pretrial judgments issued - the court 
delivers its judgment (sometimes orally, 
sometimes in writing).  Pretrial judgments 
may or may not be prepared in a form that 
is then posted online. 
- allow the judge to write reasons for judgment, 
transmit the finalized reasons for judgment to the 
parties and possibly to post those reasons for 
judgment online to make them publicly accessible 
and typically searchable (either through the 
court’s own website or through another online 
provider like QuickLaw) 
TRIAL 
8.  Trial hearing – the Crown and the accused 
appear before the court where documents 
are introduced, live witnesses are 
examined and cross-examined and oral 
arguments are made.  (The Crown bears 
the burden of proof beyond a reasonable 
doubt.)  Documents and other artifacts 
that are admitted into evidence become 
“exhibits” at trial, which are maintained 
by the court. 
Technologies that allow the court to: 
- store materials filed by the parties  
- access the record of the case thus far 
- record the proceedings 
- access the materials on demand (perhaps even to 
view them while the parties are in court making 
their arguments) 
- organize materials, eg by officially marking 
them as exhibits (typically numbered in the order 
in which they are filed) 
- allow the parties and/or witnesses to “appear” in 
ways other than in person (eg videoconferencing, 
teleconferencing, pre-recorded evidence) 
- allow the judge to record notes 
9.  Jury deliberations – if the trial is before a 
jury, the trial judge instructs the jury as to 
the related law and the questions they 
must answer and the jury retires to 
deliberate on these questions. 
Technologies that allow the jury to: 
- record notes 
- review exhibits, evidence given in the trial 
- access the internet (?) 
10. Verdict delivery – the judge (or jury if 
applicable) delivers the verdict of whether 
the accused is found guilty or not guilty.  
Sometimes a judge alone will issue the 
verdict, with reasons to follow.  If found 
guilty, the accused may be remanded into 
custody until the date set for sentencing. 
11. Reasons for trial judgment – if the trial 
was by way of judge and jury, no written 
reasons for judgment will be issued.  If the 
trial was by judge alone, the judge will 
- allow the judge to write reasons for judgment, 
transmit the finalized reasons for judgment to the 
parties and possibly to post those reasons for 
judgment online to make them publicly accessible 
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
37 
deliver his or her reasons for judgment 
(sometimes orally, sometimes in writing).  
Often transcriptions of oral judgments and 
written judgments are made available 
online through services such as QuickLaw 
or CanLII. 
and typically searchable (either through the 
court’s own website or through another online 
provider like QuickLaw) 
SENTENCING 
12. Pre-sentencing reports – in some cases, 
judges may request pre-sentence reports to 
assist them in determining what the 
appropriate sentence should be. 
Technologies that allow for: 
- electronic filing of reports 
- court access to electronic reports 
- remote examinations of the person convicted by 
experts (?) 
13. Sentencing hearing – the Crown and 
counsel for the offender appear before a 
judge and make arguments about what the 
appropriate sentence should be. 
Technologies that allow the court to: 
- store materials filed by the parties  
- access the record of the case thus far 
- record the proceedings 
- access the materials on demand (perhaps even to 
view them while the parties are in court making 
their arguments) 
- organize materials, eg by officially marking 
them as exhibits (typically numbered in the order 
in which they are filed) 
- allow the parties and/or witnesses to “appear” in 
ways other than in person (eg videoconferencing, 
teleconferencing, pre-recorded evidence) 
- allow the judge to record notes 
14. Sentencing judgment - the court delivers 
its judgment (sometimes orally, 
sometimes in writing).  Sentencing 
judgments may or may not be prepared in 
a form that is then posted online. 
- allow the judge to write reasons for judgment, 
transmit the finalized reasons for judgment to the 
parties and possibly to post those reasons for 
judgment online to make them publicly accessible 
and typically searchable (either through the 
court’s own website or through another online 
provider like QuickLaw) 
APPEAL 
15. The steps on the appeal are similar in 
nature to steps 10-16 listed above under 
APPEAL for civil litigation (although 
obviously the particular kinds of issues 
addressed at each step may well differ). 
See steps 10-16 above for civil litigation. 
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
38 
*
Associate Professor at the University of Ottawa Faculty of Law (Common Law Section) 
(jbailey@uottawa.ca).  Thanks to a large dedicated group of University of Ottawa Faculty 
of Law students volunteering for CIPPIC, to CIPPIC’s Director David Fewer, Staff 
Lawyer Tamir Israel and Legal Staff Kent Mewhort for assisting in organizing and 
overseeing the volunteers’ research, to “RA extraordinaire” Rachel Gold for her research 
and leadership relating this report, and to the Social Sciences and Humanities Research 
Council for funding The Cyberjustice Project, headed by Dr. Karim Benyekhlef of the 
Université de Montréal. 
1
http://www.canadafacts.org/size-of-canada/ 
2
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/l01/cst01/demo02a-eng.htm 
3
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Canadian_provinces_and_territories_by_area 
4
http://www.pco-
bcp.gc.ca/aia/index.asp?lang=eng&page=provterr&sub=difference&doc=difference-
eng.htm  
5
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Canadian_provinces_and_territories_by_population 
6
http://www.google.ca/imgres?q=canadian+population+dispersion+map&hl=en&sa=X&
biw=1104&bih=1126&tbm=isch&prmd=imvns&tbnid=JmrbCAg0wMY0kM:&imgrefurl
=http://mshallssocials10.blogspot.com/2010/09/population-density-map-
canada.html&docid=fGOkIoDBiDbRtM&imgurl=http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_RFoqsCfUN
8w/TJuuRcwMALI/AAAAAAAAAr8/xpk85gIra00/s1600/Population%252Bdesnity%25
2Bmap%252B2.gif&w=657&h=435&ei=YfKiT7eSEMaT6gHB6IS4BQ&zoom=1&iact=
hc&vpx=118&vpy=163&dur=420&hovh=146&hovw=220&tx=95&ty=67&sig=1168987
37434535386593&page=1&tbnh=117&tbnw=176&start=0&ndsp=30&ved=1t:429,r:0,s:
0,i:66 
7
For 2006 census purposes, “rural” populations include those living outside centres with 
a population of 1,000 and outside areas with 400 persons per square kilometer.  As of 
2006, 80% of census respondents indicated that they lived in a census identified 
metropolitan area:  http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-
som/l01/cst01/demo62a-eng.htm.  In 2001, recent immigrants (94%) were more likely 
than those born in Canada (59%) to reside in an urban area:  
http://www41.statcan.ca/2007/30000/ceb30000_000-eng.htm  
8
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/l01/cst01/demo62k-eng.htm  Census 
respondents in all other provinces and territories not mentioned were also more likely to 
reside in an urban location, although the splits between urban and rural were somewhat 
less pronounced than in Quebec, Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia (Newfoundland 
58% urban, Nova Scotia 56% urban, New Brunswick 51% urban, Manitoba 72% urban, 
Saskatchewan 65% urban and Yukon 60% urban. 
9
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/080115/dq080115a-eng.htm   
10
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-003-x/91-003-x2007001-eng.pdf at 31.  13 million 
people immigrated to Canada from other parts of the world over approximately the last 
100 years (largely from Europe in the first half of the twentieth century, with larger 
numbers of non-Europeans arriving in the latter half): 
http://www41.statcan.ca/2007/30000/ceb30000_000-eng.htm. 
23 October 2012 (amended 11 June 2014) 
based on research conducted as of May 2012 
39 
11
http://atlas.nrcan.gc.ca/site/english/maps/peopleandsociety/population/visible_minority
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/l01/cst01/demo52a-eng.htm  
12
The Constitution Act, 1867 (UK) 30 & 31 Victoria, c 3; online:  
http://www.canlii.org/en/ca/const/const1867.html, s. 133. 
13
http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/tbt/Rp-
eng.cfm?TABID=1&LANG=E&A=R&APATH=3&DETAIL=0&DIM=1&FL=A&FRE
E=0&GC=01&GID=837928&GK=1&GRP=1&O=D&PID=94817&PRID=0&PTYPE=8
8971,97154&S=0&SHOWALL=0&SUB=702&Temporal=2006&THEME=70&VID=14
928&VNAMEE=&VNAMEF=&D1=0&D2=0&D3=0&D4=0&D5=0&D6=0  
14
Ibid. 
15
http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100031774  
16
See, for example:  The Champagne and Aishinhik First Nations Self-government 
Agreement” (29 May 1993), s. 13, online:  http://www.eco.gov.yk.ca/pdf/casga_e.pdf
17
http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/aiarch/mr/nr/s-d2004/02551dbk-eng.asp  
18
The disproportionate over-representation of indigenous persons among the accused and 
those incarcerated in the Canadian criminal justice system and the need for system reform 
has been documented for some time.  See, for example:  Jonathan Rudin, “Aboriginal 
Peoples and the Criminal Justice System”, online:  
http://www.attorneygeneral.jus.gov.on.ca/inquiries/ipperwash/policy_part/research/pdf/R
udin.pdf 
19
The Constitution Act, 1867 (UK) 30 & 31 Victoria, c 3; online:  
http://www.canlii.org/en/ca/const/const1867.html, s. 91. 
20
Ibid, s. 92. 
21
http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/pi/pb-dgp/arr-ente/acces.html
http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/pi/pb-dgp/arr-ente/lap-paj.html 
22
Some provincial courts of superior jurisdiction have “Superior Court” (eg Ontario 
Superior Court of Justice) or “Supreme Court” (eg included in their titles (eg Ontario 
Superior Court of Justice and Alberta Supreme Court). 
23
Some provincial courts of limited jurisdiction have “Provincial Court” included in their 
titles, while in the Northwest Territories it is called “Territorial Court” and in Ontario it is 
called the Ontario Court of Justice.  In Nunavut, the “provincial” level court and the 
provincial superior court are combined into the Nunavut Court of Justice. 
24
http://www.parl.gc.ca/About/Parliament/SenatorEugeneForsey/book/chapter_5-e.html 
at 5.2. 
25
Ibid.  For more information on judicial independence, see:  
http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/dept-min/pub/ccs-ajc/page3.html  
26
http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/dept-min/pub/ccs-ajc/page3.html  
27
Some provincial courts of superior jurisdiction have a specialized branch called Small 
Claims Court that deals with civil cases under a fixed dollar amount.  In other provinces, 
Small Claims Court is a branch or division of the provincial court of limited jurisdiction. 
28
Some provincial courts of superior jurisdiction also have specialized family divisions 
that are set up to deal only with family matters such as divorce and support:  
http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/dept-min/pub/ccs-ajc/page3.html 
29
http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/dept-min/pub/ccs-ajc/page3.html 
30
http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/dept-min/pub/ccs-ajc/page3.html 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested