view pdf winform c# : Add links to pdf file Library SDK class asp.net .net html ajax wp01121-part1452

on subsidies in a complex way, because all the elasticities in [2] may change with the …rm
equilibrium. We will use an approximate measure of the change in e¤ort which becomes
exact in the simplest case in whichelasticities remain constant.
In addition recall that our model must be interpreted explaining ex-ante R&D expendi-
ture, plannedin advance by …rms, taking into account the degree of uncertainty associated
tosubsidies. Plans are likely tobe adjustedwhen…rmsknow for sureiftheywill be granted
or not, and the model does not say anything about how these adjustments will be carried
out. Hencewemustdistinguishtwobounds for thee¤ectsofasubsidy…nallygranted. First,
the (minimum) e¤ect associated to the ex-ante commitment of expenditures corresponding
to the expected subsidy ½
e
. Second, the (maximum) e¤ect associated to the granting of
asubsidy ½ if ex-post adjustments were carried out with the same model and parameters.
Thetruee¤ect will probably lie inbetween. In what followswedisscuss the e¤ects interms
of ½
e
,but formulae to apply with ½ are the same.
Call E
¤
e
)total e¤ort with subsidy and E
¤
(0) total e¤ort in its absence. Write (1 ¡
½
e
)E
¤
e
)for private e¤ort when expenditures are subsidised. It is easy to check that
(1¡½
e
)E
¤
e
)¡E
¤
(0)
E¤(0)
=[(1¡½
e
)
¡(¯¡1)
¡1] 70 if ¯ 7 1
Therefore, ifsubsidye¢ciency ¯is unity, privatee¤ort will remainthesame, andtotale¤ort
will be augmented by the public e¤ort fraction ½
e
E(½
e
). This means that private-…nanced
expenditures would increase by the same amount as sales. On the contrary, if ¯ exceeds
unity, the subsidy will increase private e¤ort, and total e¤ort will become higher than the
sum of the public fraction and private e¤ort without subsidy. If ¯ were less than unity,
private e¤ort wouldbe reduced. We will use this type of formula to measure subsidy e¤ort
e¤ects.
To measure this type of e¤ects, other studies take the value of some derivatives. For
example, Lach (2000) employs the derivative of private expenses with respect to subsidy in
the equation used to estimate the factors in‡uencing …rm R&D expenditures. With sales
controlledfor, this derivative amounts toa linear partial e¤ect (independent of the subsidy
speci…cation of thedemand (e.g. thepriceelasticitye¤ects of innovation).
10
Add links to pdf file - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
active links in pdf; add hyperlink to pdf
Add links to pdf file - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add link to pdf file; add page number to pdf hyperlink
value and without demand induced e¤ects). With our model, an average subsidy e¤ect of
this type can be computed by evaluating at some point the …rst term of the right hand of
the identity
(1¡½
e
)x(½
e
)¡x(0)
½ex(½e)¡0
=
(1¡½
e
)E
¤
e
)¡E
¤
(0)
½eE¤e)
+
E
¤
(0)
½eE¤e)
S(½
e
)¡S(0)
S(½e)
where S is a shorthand for sales.
4. Data and description
Thebasicdataset isanunbalancedpanel ofSpanishmanufacturing…rmssurveyedduring
the period 1990-1997, which includes nearly 2,000 …rms
14
. This sample can be considered
approximately representativeofmanufacturing. At the beginning oftheperiod, …rms under
200 workers were sampled randomly by industry and size strata retaining 5%. Firms with
more than 200 workers were all requested to participate, and the positive answers repre-
sented moreor less a self-selected60%of …rms withinthis size. Topreserve representation,
samples of newly created …rms were added every subsequent year. Exits from the sam-
ple come both from death and attrition, but they can be distinguished and attrition was
maintained under sensible limits.
The survey provides information on the total R&D expenditures of the …rms, including
intramural expenditures, R&D contracted with laboratories or research centres, and tech-
nological imports, that is, payments for licensingortechnical assistance. Weconsider a…rm
performing technological or innovative activities when it reports some R&D expenditure.
The variable to explain is technological e¤ort, de…ned as the ratio of R&Dexpenditures to
…rmsales. Inexplaining e¤ort, we usetheextensiveinformationonthe …rms’ activities cov-
eredby the survey (see the sample details on Appendix 2). In what follows, we summarise
some facts about R&D expenditures andgranted subsidies.
During the nineties, subsidies as a whole were the main incentive available for manu-
facturing …rms to undertake research programs. Our subsidy variable refers to the total
14
The survey was sponsored by the Spanish Ministry of Industry under the name “Encuesta sobre Es-
trategias Empresariales” (Survey on Firm Strategies).
11
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
HTML converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to Add necessary references
convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks; convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. metadata adding control, you can add some additional information to generated PDF file.
add links to pdf; add links to pdf acrobat
amount of public …nancing received for each …rm under di¤erent program headings
15
.
Tables 1 and 2 report some facts about the degree to which Spanish manufacturing
…rms engage in formal R&D activities. Table 1 shows that the probability of undertaking
R&D activities in a given year increases sharply with size (20% of the …rms under 200
workers and 75% of …rms with more than 200 workers), and that this probability has been
increasingslightlyover timefor the…rms of all sizes. Table2adopts anotherperspective by
distinguishingpermanent andstable performers during the period. Stable R&Dperformers
are …rms that report R&D expenditures every year they remain in the sample. Occasional
performers are the …rms that report R&Dexpenditures only some of the years they remain
in the sample. Stable performance of R&Dactivities is strongly correlated with size.
Tables 3 and 4 report the main facts about grants. Table 3 shows that only a small
fraction of R&D performers receive subsidies and that the proportion of subsidised …rms
increases with …rm size, at least for the stable performers. Table 4 shows that the typical
subsidy covers between 20% and 40% of the R&D expenditures and also that the rate of
subsidisedexpenditure, unlike its granting, does not show aclearrelationshipwith…rmsize
(although the biggest …rms tend to obtain smaller rates of coverage).
Tables 5and6 take a …rst look at the relationship betweensubsidies and e¤ort, based on
the R&D performers’ data. Both tables show a positive association between the granting
of subsidies and R&D e¤ort, both in the whole period and year to year. The data tend to
showevenmore than“additionality,” inthe sensethat the di¤erence betweenthesubsidised
and not subsidisede¤orts as a proportion of the former tends to be higher thanthe typical
subsidycoverage. Therefore, datasuggestthelikelihoodofpositivee¤orte¤ectsofsubsidies.
But this can be solely the e¤ect of other non-controlled variables or that the relationship
is expected to go either way: …rms with more e¤ort are more likely to receive subsidies.
15
CommercialR&D subsidiesinSpainmayhavethreesources. Firstly,theEuropeanFrameworkprogram,
with a wide variety of subprograms (information, telecommunications, biotechnologies, aerospace...) but
which reach a very small number of …rms. Secondly, the Ministry of Industry programs, which include
the subsidies granted by the specialised agency CDTI (Centre for Industrial Technological Development).
Finally,thetechnological actions ofregional governments.
12
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Add necessary references: This professional .NET solution that is designed to convert PDF file to HTML web page
add hyperlink to pdf online; add url link to pdf
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Add, edit, delete links. Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically. Read form data from PDF form file. Add, Update, Delete form fields programmatically.
add links to pdf file; change link in pdf
Only the implementation of the econometric model can provide further insights on this
relationship.
5. Econometric results
In what follows, we …rstly detail the speci…cation and estimationof the equations aimed
at estimating the expectedsubsidy. Then, we comment the speci…cation and estimation of
the Tobit type e¤ort model.
5.1 Expected subsidies
We estimate the unobservable…rms’ expectations ½
e
startingfrom theex post observable
grantedsubsidies, usingthetwoequations speci…cationgivenby[6]. Underlyingtheprocess
bywhichsubsidiesaregrantedthereisacomplexprocessofsome…rmsapplyingforsubsidies
and the relevant public agency granting the subsidies to a subset of them. The probability
of obtainig a subsidy must then be seen as the product of the probability of applying for a
grantbytheprobabilityofobtainingit
16
,andthedeterminantsoftheprobabilityofsubsidy
must be understood to re‡ect in part the likelihood of incurring the costs of applying.
We want to predict the expected result of this process by means of a set of variables
which can be considered exogeneous or, at least, predetermined. We will use the same set
of variables to estimate the conditional probability of receiving a subsidy, using a probit
speci…cation, and the conditional expected value of the (log of) subsidy when it is granted,
using a linear equation estimated by OLS. The expected subsidy will be computed as the
product of the predicted probability by the predicted conditional value for ½.
Inestimatingtheequations, we considerthefollowingsetofexplanatory variables: …rstly,
the value of subsidy in the previous period, in order to pick up persistence, which can be
based either on projects spread over several years or the renewal of grants by experienced
…rms; secondly, three indicators of the degree of commitment with R&D activities: lagged
R&De¤ort, a dummy variable indicating whether the …rm posseses R&Demployment, and
adummy variable indicating whether the …rm is an occasional performer; thirdly, a series
16
Wecannot separately identify the sample of non-applying …rms.
13
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness). Add necessary references This is a C# programming example for converting PDF to Word
add links in pdf; adding links to pdf in preview
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
adding a link to a pdf; add hyperlinks pdf file
of characteristics that may enhance the willigness to apply and/or the eligibility of …rms:
on the one hand, two dummies respectively indicating the presence of skilled labour and
the size of the …rm, as well as avariable re‡ectingthe …rms’ experience with respect to the
other …rms in its industry (relative age); on the other, two indicators that can turn out to
be signi…cant mainly bypolitico-economicreasonsof grantingagencies: adummy ifthe…rm
posseses foreign capital andanother if the …rmis anexporter. Finally, we addthree sets of
dummie variables to account for sectoral heterogeneity (industry dummies), di¤erences in
regional support policies (region dummies), and changes over time (time dummies).
Table 7 reports the results of the estimation. The …t of both equations is reasonable,
with a good score of cases correctly predicted
17
and 85% of the variance of the subsidies’
value explained
18
.
Persistence turns out to be signi…cant. Commitment positively in‡uences probability but
has a negative impact on the expected value of the subsidy. Firms with skilled labour,
big size anda highproductive experience also have more probability of obtaining subsidies
but also of lesser amounts. Being an exporting …rm positively in‡uences probability and,
less precisely, the value of the subsidy. Firms with foreign capital show less probability of
obtaining a subsidy and a smaller expected value of the granted subsidies. Industry and
region dummies are not individually signi…cant in the probability equation, even if some
sectors and regions tend to show signi…cantly greater expected subsidies.
Althouhthe characterisation of the granting process is not the main target of these esti-
mations, theyseemgoodenoughtoprovideanstylisedsummary of it: the big, experienced,
research committed and exporting …rms are more likely to repeteadly obtaining grants for
their innovative activities, but agencies seemtoapplysomecriteria inexpenditurecoverage
favouring the relatively newest and domestic …rms.
5.2 Tobit Model
Let usnow detail thespeci…cationofequations[3] and[5] -e¤ortandthresholdequations-
of the Tobit model, taking into account our previous discussion of the factors in‡uencing
17
Thecriticalvaluefor the probability equation,given the high number of zeroes, is adjusted to 0.1.
18
Fivesubsidies arepredicted over100% and wedrop theseobservations in the following exercises.
14
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
add hyperlinks to pdf online; add url to pdf
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Add necessary references class programming, you can use specific APIs to create PDF file.
pdf email link; add links pdf document
the e¤ort givenby equation [2] andits observability.
We divide the explanatory variables in three groups: variables aimed at performing as
indicators of market power, variables used to denote a high sensitivity of demand with
respect to product quality and/or product quality with respect to R&D expenditure, and
variables employedto approximate set-up costs andthe heterogeneity of thresholds among
…rms. No variable canobviously be claimedto pick-upexclusively the type of e¤ects of the
heading under which it has been clasi…ed, but the grouping is based both on theoretical
considerations and the variables’ performanceinthe regression, andit seems useful inorder
to summarise the empirical e¤ects.
With the important exception of expected subsidies, in principle it must be admitted
that the same variables canhave a role in explaining the optimal e¤orts andthe thresholds
for pro…table e¤ort. This partly happens because we have to rely on indirect indicators
of the underlying demand and technological determinants, but also for theoretical reasons:
thresholdstendtodependonthesamefactorsase¤ortalthoughinadi¤erentway. However,
inpractice, wewill …ndit bothacceptableanduseful to impose someexclusionand equality
constraints to gain e¢ciency.
We …rstly exclude a series of variables of the e¤ort equation, using them only to explain
di¤erences among thresholds in the threshold equation. Most of these variables turned
out to be in practice non-signi…cant in the e¤ort equation and the e¤ect of some other
can be argued to be already picked up by other variables in this equation. On the other
hand, weimpose anumber of equalityrestrictions betweencoe¢cients of thetwo equations.
They correspond to a few cases in which the di¤erence between the coe¢cients of the two
equations always tended to be statistically non-signi…cant. Finally, we exclude the market
power variables from the threshold equation. Our theoretical framework is not entirely
conclusive as to whether these variables have to be expected to have a (small) role in this
equation, but the exclusion constraint is clearly accepted statistically by our estimates.
Let us brie‡y detail the variables included in estimation and their expected roles. Three
variables integrate the set of market power indicators: the …rm’ market share, a dummy
variable that takes the value one if the …rm’ product may be considered di¤erentiated and
15
the advertising/sales ratio. The second and third variables may be seen as picking up
di¤erent dimensions of the same source of market power (product di¤erentiation). The …rst
and third ones enter the equation lagged one periodto avoid simultaneity biases.
Three variables are included to perform as indicators of a high sensitivity of demand
with respect to product quality and/or product quality with respect to R&D expenditure.
These variables are: the ratio of highly quali…ed workers to total employment, the number
of product innovations reportedby the …rm dividedby the number ofworkers (lagged), and
adummy variable that takes the value one if the market is considered to be in expansion.
Five variables are included to give an account of di¤erent aspects of set-up costs. We
…rstly include the average industry patents (excluding the patents obtained by the …rm,
a classic formal technological opportunities measure), the …rm capital/sales ratio, and a
dummy variable indicating whether the …rm is an occasional R&D performer. We expect
the two …rst variables to act as direct indicators of high …xed costs of R&D linked to spe-
ci…ctechnological product requirements. The occasional character oftheR&D performance
may be seen, instead, as an (indirect) indicator of an easy set-up of tecnological activities.
On the other hand, a mergers dummy variable gives account of signi…cant changes of the
…rm scale through “external” growth. Finally, we include a dummy variable representing
concentrated markets (the variable takes the value one for markets with less than 10 com-
petitors) interacted with the size of the …rm. This variable tries to account for the fact
that relevant set-up costs must be measured in terms relative to the …rm scale. Big …rms
in concentrated markets are likely to experiment smaller set-up costs ratios.
Inaddition, wehavefoundthresholdsinpracticetobesensitivetoasmall listof the…rms,
…rms’ market and …rms’ technology characteristics, all represented by dummy variables.
The list includes the presence of foreign capital, a big dimension of the product market
(national or international as opposed to local or regional), to be located in an autonomous
community with strong spillovers, to be an exporting …rm, to have a product sensitive to
quality controls and to have a technologically sophisticated production process. All these
variables are likely to reduce relative set-up expenses, and some of them will also enhance
the demand for quality. Moreover, it will turn out to be very important to include a set of
16
dummy variables of size, measured according to the number of employees, to control for a
strong remaining threshold size e¤ect.
Moreover in both equations we include a set of 18 sector dummies, to control for per-
manent di¤erences arising from activities, and a set of time dummies, which we include
constrained to have the same e¤ects in both equations. Details on all the employed vari-
ables can be found in Appendix 2.
Table 8 reports the results of our preferred estimate of the model. As explained in
Appendix 1, estimationis carriedoutby specifying the likelihoodofadecision andane¤ort
equation, fromwhich the coe¢cients and standard errors of the threshold equation may be
deducted. Blank spaces in the table denote the coe¢cients which have been constrained
to zero in some of the equations. Notice that, in this case, the values of the coe¢cients
consigned in the other two columns coincide in absolute value.
The estimate is robust to changes, its predictive power sensible, and the coe¢cient and
statistics look reasonable. We brie‡y comment these characteristics in turn. The estimate
of Table 8 is obtained by constraining the coe¢cient ¯ and the market power variables to
havethesamevalueinthedecisionande¤ortequationsof amoregeneral speci…cation. This
amounts toexcluding themfromthethresholdequation andit canbe statistically accepted
under a likelihood ratio test of 1.82
19
. In fact, the ¯ values obtained in the two equations
are very close before constraining it (1.65 and 1.48), and we take this as proof of validity
of the speci…cation. In particular, alternative speci…cations basically lead to maintain the
rest of e¤ects unaltered with an increase of the di¤erence between the unscontrained ¯’s.
On the other hand, theinclusionofa dummy variableindicating likelycompetitionchanges
(inferedfrom…rmreportedprice movements attributedtomarketchanges) does not change
the basic results without becoming statistically signi…cant.
We can evaluate the goodness of the …t of the model according to its predictions. Recall
thatthemodel predicts thatthe…rmwill engageinR&Dactivitieswhenthe di¤erence be
¤
¡
b
e
is positive. Table 8 (bottom) reports the results of comparing the model predictions with
19
Instead, the constraintthat the ¾’s ofthetwo equationsare the sameis rejected-when imposed jointly
with theconstraint on thecoe¢cient¯- bya likelihoodratio test value of 5.98.
17
the actual observations in the sample for three subgroups of …rms: stable R&D performers,
occasional performers and …rms never observed performing R&D. The model accurately
predicts the zero-one variable that denotes the presence of expenditures for the …rms that
neveroralwaysengageinR&Dactivities(97%and85%ofobservationscorrectlypredicted).
Themodel is, however, muchless accurateinpredictingthe yearly activity of the occasional
performers. Predictioncontinues tobequitegoodwhenR&Dexpendituresarezero(71%of
observations correctly predicted), but assigns erroneouslynegative predictions inhalf of the
cases in which the …rms show occasional expenditures. This is hardly surprising if we take
into account the highdegree of arbitrariness of some …rmaccounting practices inallocating
costs over time and the lack of dynamic structure of the model.
Thekeyvariable, expectedsubsidy, isincludedintheform¡ln(1¡
b
½e), andmusttherefore
attract a ¯ coe¢cient around unity. The value e¤ectively obtained is 1.58, which indicates
ahighe¢ciency of public funds. This estimate gives sensible results on the e¤ect of subsi-
dies, which in particular are very close in magnitude to the comparable subsidy e¤ects on
company …nanced expenditure reported in recent papers (see the detailed analysis of the
next section).
Onthe other hand, theinterpretationoftheresultsobtainedcanbedoneas follows. Mar-
ket power is con…rmed as a determinant of e¤ort, while it seems to have a non-signi…cant
e¤ect on thresholds. The variables aimedat indicating ahighquality-sensitivity of demand
or expenditure-sensitivity of quality show more mixed results. They present signi…cant
positive e¤ects on e¤ort, but we are not able to pick up with some precision the expected
negative e¤ects on thresholds. However, this is compensated by the role that similar vari-
ables play in explaining thresholds (quality controls and technological sophistication). As
expected, high set-upcosts clearly appear toincrease optimal e¤ort and thresholds, but the
scale e¤ect associated with a concentrated market and a big size also lessens this impact.
Finally other …rm characteristics such as having foreign capital, a big market (domestic
or by inclusion of markets abroad), or bene…ts steeming from geographical spillovers, help
to reduce thresholds. In addition, after controlling for all these variables, it remains an
important size e¤ect by which big …rms experience smaller thresholds. This points out the
18
permanence of a problem of indivisibility of resources to set up R&D activities, indepen-
dently of the industry or …rm type, explaining asigni…cant part ofsmall …rms’ problems to
undertake these activities.
6. Pro…tability gaps and subsidy e¤ects
Model predictions and parameter estimates can be used to evaluate pro…tability gaps
and the e¤ects of subsidies in a number of ways, which we have explained in detail in sec-
tion 3. In this section we …rstly report the results of computing pro…tability gaps, or the
di¤erences between optimal e¤orts in the absence of subsidies and the …rms’ idiosyncratic
thresholde¤orts. This is done using all the correctly predicted observations.Thenweassess
the potential and actual roles of subsidies in R&D decisions. We …rst report the results of
computingthe trigger subsidies, or thevalueofsubsidies that wouldinducenon-performing
…rms to undertake R&D activities, for all the (correctly predicted) non-expenditure obser-
vations. But we also evaluate the impact of actual subsidies on R&D decisions, by looking
at the …rms that would cease to perform R&D if subsidies were eliminated. The number of
…rms abandoning R&Dinthe absence ofsubsidies turns outto be very small, perhaps abit
surprisingly, and we check the robustness of this result. Next we focus on the e¤ort e¤ects
of subsidies. We employ the ¯ estimate, jointly with the ½
e
estimates and the observed
½for the (correctly predicted) …rms performing R&D that e¤ectively receive subsidies, to
assess the impact of subsidies in private expenditure. Finally, we compare our estimates
with other recent results.
Table 9 reports the distribution of the estimated pro…tability gaps, and Figure 1 depicts
95% of their values (the graphic leaves 2.5% of observations unrepresented in each tail).
Pro…tability gaps show a skew distribution, with a long tail of negative values, and some
concentration of observations around the zero value that presents a greater frequency of
positive gaps. Positive gaps represent 30% of total observations and their mean is about
1%, while negative values average an absolute value of 3.7%. More than 85% of positive
values lie in the interval (0,1.5), while less than 75% of negative values lie in the broader
19
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested