open pdf and draw c# : Add hyperlink pdf document control SDK system azure winforms web page console %5BO%60Reilly%5D%20-%20JavaScript.%20The%20Definitive%20Guide,%206th%20ed.%20-%20%5BFlanagan%5D1-part1528

7.11 Array-Like Objects
158
7.12 Strings As Arrays
160
8. Functions ............................................................ 163
8.1 Defining Functions
164
8.2 Invoking Functions
166
8.3 Function Arguments and Parameters
171
8.4 Functions As Values
176
8.5 Functions As Namespaces
178
8.6 Closures
180
8.7 Function Properties, Methods, and Constructor
186
8.8 Functional Programming
191
9. Classes and Modules ................................................... 199
9.1 Classes and Prototypes
200
9.2 Classes and Constructors
201
9.3 Java-Style Classes in JavaScript
205
9.4 Augmenting Classes
208
9.5 Classes and Types
209
9.6 Object-Oriented Techniques in JavaScript
215
9.7 Subclasses
228
9.8 Classes in ECMAScript 5
238
9.9 Modules
246
10. Pattern Matching with Regular Expressions ............................... 251
10.1 Defining Regular Expressions
251
10.2 String Methods for Pattern Matching
259
10.3 The RegExp Object
261
11. JavaScript Subsets and Extensions ....................................... 265
11.1 JavaScript Subsets
266
11.2 Constants and Scoped Variables
269
11.3 Destructuring Assignment
271
11.4 Iteration
274
11.5 Shorthand Functions
282
11.6 Multiple Catch Clauses
283
11.7 E4X: ECMAScript for XML
283
12. Server-Side JavaScript ................................................. 289
12.1 Scripting Java with Rhino
289
12.2 Asynchronous I/O with Node
296
Table of Contents | ix
Add hyperlink pdf document - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add url pdf; pdf link
Add hyperlink pdf document - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add page number to pdf hyperlink; pdf link open in new window
Part II.  Client-Side JavaScript 
13. JavaScript in Web Browsers ............................................. 307
13.1 Client-Side JavaScript
307
13.2 Embedding JavaScript in HTML
311
13.3 Execution of JavaScript Programs
317
13.4 Compatibility and Interoperability
325
13.5 Accessibility
332
13.6 Security
332
13.7 Client-Side Frameworks
338
14. The Window Object ...................................................  341
14.1 Timers
341
14.2 Browser Location and Navigation
343
14.3 Browsing History
345
14.4 Browser and Screen Information
346
14.5 Dialog Boxes
348
14.6 Error Handling
351
14.7 Document Elements As Window Properties
351
14.8 Multiple Windows and Frames
353
15. Scripting Documents .................................................. 361
15.1 Overview of the DOM
361
15.2 Selecting Document Elements
364
15.3 Document Structure and Traversal
371
15.4 Attributes
375
15.5 Element Content
378
15.6 Creating, Inserting, and Deleting Nodes
382
15.7 Example: Generating a Table of Contents
387
15.8 Document and Element Geometry and Scrolling
389
15.9 HTML Forms
396
15.10 Other Document Features
405
16. Scripting CSS ......................................................... 413
16.1 Overview of CSS
414
16.2 Important CSS Properties
419
16.3 Scripting Inline Styles
431
16.4 Querying Computed Styles
435
16.5 Scripting CSS Classes
437
16.6 Scripting Stylesheets
440
17. Handling Events ...................................................... 445
17.1 Types of Events
447
x | Table of Contents
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing
add links to pdf in acrobat; add links pdf document
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing
adding links to pdf document; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
17.2 Registering Event Handlers
456
17.3 Event Handler Invocation
460
17.4 Document Load Events
465
17.5 Mouse Events
467
17.6 Mousewheel Events
471
17.7 Drag and Drop Events
474
17.8 Text Events
481
17.9 Keyboard Events
484
18. Scripted HTTP ........................................................ 491
18.1 Using XMLHttpRequest
494
18.2 HTTP by <script>: JSONP
513
18.3 Comet with Server-Sent Events
515
19. The jQuery Library ....................................................  523
19.1 jQuery Basics
524
19.2 jQuery Getters and Setters
531
19.3 Altering Document Structure
537
19.4 Handling Events with jQuery
540
19.5 Animated Effects
551
19.6 Ajax with jQuery
558
19.7 Utility Functions
571
19.8 jQuery Selectors and Selection Methods
574
19.9 Extending jQuery with Plug-ins
582
19.10 The jQuery UI Library
585
20. Client-Side Storage .................................................... 587
20.1 localStorage and sessionStorage
589
20.2 Cookies
593
20.3 IE userData Persistence
599
20.4 Application Storage and Offline Webapps
601
21. Scripted Media and Graphics ............................................ 613
21.1 Scripting Images
613
21.2 Scripting Audio and Video
615
21.3 SVG: Scalable Vector Graphics
622
21.4 Graphics in a <canvas>
630
22. HTML5 APIs .......................................................... 667
22.1 Geolocation
668
22.2 History Management
671
22.3 Cross-Origin Messaging
676
22.4 Web Workers
680
Table of Contents | xi
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
pdf link to email; accessible links in pdf
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Add necessary references DOCXDocument doc = new DOCXDocument(inputFilePath); // Convert it to PDF document.
add link to pdf acrobat; add hyperlinks pdf file
22.5 Typed Arrays and ArrayBuffers
687
22.6 Blobs
691
22.7 The Filesystem API
700
22.8 Client-Side Databases
705
22.9 Web Sockets
712
Part III.  Core JavaScript Reference 
Core JavaScript Reference .................................................... 719
Part IV.  Client-Side JavaScript Reference 
Client-Side JavaScript Reference .............................................. 859
Index .................................................................... 1019
xii | Table of Contents
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Excel to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; add link to pdf file
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url), which provide quick access to the website or other file.
accessible links in pdf; pdf link
Preface
This book covers the JavaScript language and the JavaScript APIs implemented by web
browsers. I wrote it for readers with at least some prior programming experience who
want to learn JavaScript and also for programmers who already use JavaScript but want
to take their understanding to a new level and really master the language and the web
platform. My goal with this book is to document the JavaScript language and platform
comprehensively and definitively. As a result, this is a large and detailed book. My hope,
however, is that it will reward careful study, and that the time you spend reading it will
be easily recouped in the form of higher programming productivity.
This book is divided into four parts. Part I covers the JavaScript language itself.
Part II covers client-side JavaScript: the JavaScript APIs defined by HTML5 and related
standards and implemented by web browsers. Part III is the reference section for the
core language, and Part IV is the reference for client-side JavaScript. Chapter 1 includes
an outline of the chapters in Parts I and II (see §1.1).
This sixth edition of the book covers both ECMAScript 5 (the latest version of the core
language) and HTML5 (the latest version of the web platform). You’ll find
ECMAScript 5 material throughout Part I. The new material on HTML5 is mostly in
the chapters at the end of Part II, but there is also some in other chapters as well.
Completely new chapters in this edition include Chapter 11, JavaScript Subsets and
ExtensionsChapter 12, Server-Side JavaScriptChapter 19, The jQuery Library; and
Chapter 22, HTML5 APIs.
Readers of previous editions may notice that I have completely rewritten many of the
chapters in this book for the sixth edition. The core of Part I—the chapters covering
objects, arrays, functions, and classes—is all new and brings the book in line with
current programming styles and best practices. Similarly, key chapters of Part II, such
as those covering documents and events, have been completely rewritten to bring them
up-to-date.
xiii
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Add necessary references doc As DOCXDocument = New DOCXDocument(inputFilePath) ' Convert it to PDF document.
adding hyperlinks to pdf documents; clickable links in pdf from word
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit. Support adding and inserting hyperlink (link) to PDF document; Allow to create, edit, and remove PDF bookmark
add a link to a pdf in preview; chrome pdf from link
A Note About Piracy
If you are reading a digital version of this book that you (or your employer) did not pay
for (or borrow from someone who did) then you probably have an illegally pirated copy.
Writing the sixth edition of this book was a full-time job, and it took more than a year.
The only way I get paid for that time is when readers actually buy the book. And the
only way I can afford to work on a seventh edition is if I get paid for the sixth.
I do not condone piracy, but if you have a pirated copy, go ahead and read a couple of
chapters. I think that you’ll find that this is a valuable source of information about
JavaScript, better organized and of higher quality than what you can find freely (and
legally) available on the Web. If you agree that this is a valuable source of information,
then please pay for that value by purchasing a legal copy (either digital or print) of the
book. On the other hand, if you find that this book is no more valuable than the free
information on the web, then please discard your pirated copy and use those free
information sources.
Conventions Used in This Book
I use the following typographical conventions in this book:
Italic
Is used for emphasis and to indicate the first use of a term. Italic is also used for
email addresses, URLs and file names.
Constant width
Is used in all JavaScript code and CSS and HTML listings, and generally for any-
thing that you would type literally when programming.
Constant width italic
Is used for the names of function parameters, and generally as a placeholder to
indicate an item that should be replaced with an actual value in your program.
Example Code
The examples in this book are available online. You can find them linked from the
book’s catalog page at the publisher’s website:
http://oreilly.com/catalog/9780596805531/
This book is here to help you get your job done. In general, you may use the code in
this book in your programs and documentation. You do not need to contact O’Reilly
for permission unless you’re reproducing a significant portion of the code. For example,
writing a program that uses several chunks of code from this book does not require
permission. Selling or distributing a CD-ROM of examples from O’Reilly books does
require permission. Answering a question by citing this book and quoting example
xiv | Preface
code does not require permission. Incorporating a significant amount of example code
from this book into your product’s documentation does require permission.
If you use the code from this book, I appreciate, but do not require, attribution. An
attribution usually includes the title, author, publisher, and ISBN. For example: “Java-
Script: The Definitive Guide, by David Flanagan (O’Reilly). Copyright 2011 David Fla-
nagan, 978-0-596-80552-4.”
For more details on the O’Reilly code reuse policy, see http://oreilly.com/pub/a/oreilly/
ask_tim/2001/codepolicy.html. If you feel your use of the examples falls outside of the
permission given above, feel free to contact O’Reilly at permissions@oreilly.com.
Errata and How to Contact Us
The publisher maintains a public list of errors found in this book. You can view the
list, and submit the errors you find, by visiting the book’s web page:
http://oreilly.com/catalog/9780596805531
To comment or ask technical questions about this book, send email to:
bookquestions@oreilly.com
For more information about our books, conferences, Resource Centers, and the
O’Reilly Network, see our website at:
http://www.oreilly.com
Find us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/oreilly
Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/oreillymedia
Watch us on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/oreillymedia
Acknowledgments
Many people have helped me with the creation of this book. I’d like to thank my editor,
Mike Loukides, for trying to keep me on schedule and for his insightful comments.
Thanks also to my technical reviewers: Zachary Kessin, who reviewed many of the
chapters in Part I, and Raffaele Cecco, who reviewed Chapter 19 and the 
<canvas>
material in Chapter 21. The production team at O’Reilly has done their usual fine job:
Dan Fauxsmith managed the production process, Teresa Elsey was the production
editor, Rob Romano drew the figures, and Ellen Troutman Zaig created the index.
In this era of effortless electronic communication, it is impossible to keep track of all
those who influence and inform us. I’d like to thank everyone who has answered my
questions on the es5, w3c, and whatwg mailing lists, and everyone who has shared their
insightful ideas about JavaScript programming online. I’m sorry I can’t list you all by
Preface | xv
name, but it is a pleasure to work within such a vibrant community of JavaScript
programmers.
Editors, reviewers, and contributors to previous editions of this book have included:
Andrew Schulman, Angelo Sirigos, Aristotle Pagaltzis, Brendan Eich, Christian
Heilmann, Dan Shafer, Dave C. Mitchell, Deb Cameron, Douglas Crockford, Dr.
Tankred Hirschmann, Dylan Schiemann, Frank Willison, Geoff Stearns, Herman Ven-
ter, Jay Hodges, Jeff Yates, Joseph Kesselman, Ken Cooper, Larry Sullivan, Lynn Roll-
ins, Neil Berkman, Nick Thompson, Norris Boyd, Paula Ferguson, Peter-Paul Koch,
Philippe Le Hegaret, Richard Yaker, Sanders Kleinfeld, Scott Furman, Scott Issacs,
Shon Katzenberger, Terry Allen, Todd Ditchendorf, Vidur Apparao, and Waldemar
Horwat.
This edition of the book is substantially rewritten and kept me away from my family
for many late nights. My love to them and my thanks for putting up with my absences.
— David Flanagan (davidflanagan.com), March 2011
xvi | Preface
CHAPTER 1
Introduction to JavaScript
JavaScript is the programming language of the Web. The overwhelming majority of
modern websites use JavaScript, and all modern web browsers—on desktops, game
consoles, tablets, and smart phones—include JavaScript interpreters, making Java-
Script the most ubiquitous programming language in history. JavaScript is part of the
triad of technologies that all Web developers must learn: HTML to specify the content
of web pages, CSS to specify the presentation of web pages, and JavaScript to specify
the behavior of web pages. This book will help you master the language.
If you are already familiar with other programming languages, it may help you to know
that JavaScript is a high-level, dynamic, untyped interpreted programming language
that is well-suited to object-oriented and functional programming styles. JavaScript
derives its syntax from Java, its first-class functions from Scheme, and its prototype-
based inheritance from Self. But you do not need to know any of those languages, or
be familiar with those terms, to use this book and learn JavaScript.
The name “JavaScript” is actually somewhat misleading. Except for a superficial syn-
tactic resemblance, JavaScript is completely different from the Java programming lan-
guage. And JavaScript has long since outgrown its scripting-language roots to become
a robust and efficient general-purpose language. The latest version of the language (see
the sidebar) defines new features for serious large-scale software development.
1
JavaScript: Names and Versions
JavaScript was created at Netscape in the early days of the Web, and technically, “Java-
Script” is a trademark licensed from Sun Microsystems (now Oracle) used to describe
Netscape’s (now Mozilla’s) implementation of the language. Netscape submitted the
language for standardization to ECMA—the European Computer Manufacturer’s As-
sociation—and because of trademark issues, the standardized version of the language
was stuck with the awkward name “ECMAScript.” For the same trademark reasons,
Microsoft’s version of the language is formally known as “JScript.” In practice, just
about everyone calls the language JavaScript. This book uses the name “ECMAScript”
only to refer to the language standard.
For the last decade, all web browsers have implemented version 3 of the ECMAScript
standard and there has really been no need to think about version numbers: the lan-
guage standard was stable and browser implementations of the language were, for the
most part, interoperable. Recently, an important new version of the language has been
defined as ECMAScript version 5 and, at the time of this writing, browsers are beginning
to implement it. This book covers all the new features of ECMAScript 5 as well as all
the long-standing features of ECMAScript 3. You’ll sometimes see these language ver-
sions abbreviated as ES3 and ES5, just as you’ll sometimes see the name JavaScript
abbreviated as JS.
When we’re speaking of the language itself, the only version numbers that are relevant
are ECMAScript versions 3 or 5. (Version 4 of ECMAScript was under development
for years, but proved to be too ambitious and was never released.) Sometimes, however,
you’ll also see a JavaScript version number, such as JavaScript 1.5 or JavaScript 1.8.
These are Mozilla’s version numbers: version 1.5 is basically ECMAScript 3, and later
versions include nonstandard language extensions (see Chapter 11). Finally, there are
also version numbers attached to particular JavaScript interpreters or “engines.” Goo-
gle calls its JavaScript interpreter V8, for example, and at the time of this writing the
current version of the V8 engine is 3.0.
To be useful, every language must have a platform or standard library or API of func-
tions for performing things like basic input and output. The core JavaScript language
defines a minimal API for working with text, arrays, dates, and regular expressions but
does not include any input or output functionality. Input and output (as well as more
sophisticated features, such as networking, storage, and graphics) are the responsibility
of the “host environment” within which JavaScript is embedded. Usually that host
environment is a web browser (though we’ll see two uses of JavaScript without a web
browser in Chapter 12). Part I of this book covers the language itself and its minimal
built-in API. Part II explains how JavaScript is used in web browsers and covers the
sprawling browser-based APIs loosely known as “client-side JavaScript.”
Part III is the reference section for the core API. You can read about the JavaScript array
manipulation API by looking up “Array” in this part of the book, for example.
Part IV is the reference section for client-side JavaScript. You might look up “Canvas”
2 | Chapter 1: Introduction to JavaScript
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested