open pdf and draw c# : Add url pdf control Library system azure asp.net web page console %5BO%60Reilly%5D%20-%20JavaScript.%20The%20Definitive%20Guide,%206th%20ed.%20-%20%5BFlanagan%5D10-part1529

x
typeof x
any function
"function"
any nonfunction native object
"object"
any host object
An implementation-defined string, but not “undefined”, “boolean”, “number”, or “string”.
You might use the 
typeof
operator in an expression like this:
(typeof value == "string") ? "'" + value + "'" : value
The 
typeof
operator is also useful when used with the 
switch
statement (§5.4.3). Note
that you can place parentheses around the operand to 
typeof
, which makes 
typeof
look
like the name of a function rather than an operator keyword:
typeof(i)
Note that 
typeof
returns “object” if the operand value is 
null
. If you want to distinguish
null
from objects, you’ll have to explicitly test for this special-case value. 
typeof
may
return a string other than “object” for host objects. In practice, however, most host
objects in client-side JavaScript have a type of “object”.
Because 
typeof
evaluates to “object” for all object and array values other than functions,
it is useful only to distinguish objects from other, primitive types. In order to distinguish
one class  of object from another, you must use other techniques, such as the
instanceof
operator (see §4.9.4), the class attribute (see §6.8.2), or the 
constructor
property (see §6.8.1 and §9.2.2).
Although functions in JavaScript are a kind of object, the 
typeof
operator considers
functions to be sufficiently different that they have their own return value. JavaScript
makes a subtle distinction between functions and “callable objects.” All functions are
callable, but it is possible to have a callable object—that can be invoked just like a
function—that is not a true function. The ECMAScript 3 spec says that the 
typeof
operator returns “function” for all native object that are callable. The ECMAScript 5
specification extends this to require that 
typeof
return “function” for all callable ob-
jects, whether native objects or host objects. Most browser vendors use native Java-
Script function objects for the methods of their host objects. Microsoft, however, has
always used non-native callable objects for their client-side methods, and before IE 9
the 
typeof
operator returns “object” for them, even though they behave like functions.
In IE9 these client-side methods are now true native function objects. See §8.7.7 for
more on the distinction between true functions and callable objects.
4.13  Miscellaneous Operators | 83
Core JavaScript
Add url pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add url to pdf; add link to pdf
Add url pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlink to pdf; add hyperlink pdf
4.13.3  The delete Operator
delete
is a unary operator that attempts to delete the object property or array element
specified as its operand.
1
Like the assignment, increment, and decrement operators,
delete
is typically used for its property deletion side effect, and not for the value it
returns. Some examples:
var o = { x: 1, y: 2}; // Start with an object
delete o.x;            // Delete one of its properties
"x" in o               // => false: the property does not exist anymore
var a = [1,2,3];       // Start with an array
delete a[2];           // Delete the last element of the array
a.length               // => 2: array only has two elements now
Note that a deleted property or array element is not merely set to the 
undefined
value.
When a property is deleted, the property ceases to exist. Attempting to read a non-
existent property returns 
undefined
, but you can test for the actual existence of a prop-
erty with the 
in
operator (§4.9.3).
delete
expects its operand to be an lvalue. If it is not an lvalue, the operator takes no
action and returns 
true
. Otherwise, 
delete
attempts to delete the specified lvalue.
delete
returns 
true
if it successfully deletes the specified lvalue. Not all properties can
be deleted, however: some built-in core and client-side properties are immune from
deletion, and user-defined variables declared with the 
var
statement cannot be deleted.
Functions defined with the 
function
statement and declared function parameters can-
not be deleted either.
In ECMAScript 5 strict mode, 
delete
raises a SyntaxError if its operand is an unqualified
identifier such as a variable, function, or function parameter: it only works when the
operand is a property access expression (§4.4). Strict mode also specifies that 
delete
raises a TypeError if asked to delete any nonconfigurable property (see §6.7). Outside
of strict mode, no exception occurs in these cases and 
delete
simply returns 
false
to
indicate that the operand could not be deleted.
Here are some example uses of the delete operator:
var o = {x:1, y:2};  // Define a variable; initialize it to an object
delete o.x;          // Delete one of the object properties; returns true
typeof o.x;          // Property does not exist; returns "undefined"
delete o.x;          // Delete a nonexistent property; returns true
delete o;            // Can't delete a declared variable; returns false.
// Would raise an exception in strict mode.
delete 1;            // Argument is not an lvalue: returns true
this.x = 1;          // Define a property of the a global object without var
delete x;            // Try to delete it: returns true in non-strict mode
1. If you are a C++ programmer, note that the 
delete
keyword in JavaScript is nothing like the 
delete
keyword in C++. In JavaScript, memory deallocation is handled automatically by garbage collection, and
you never have to worry about explicitly freeing up memory. Thus, there is no need for a C++-style
delete
to delete entire objects.
84 | Chapter 4: Expressions and Operators
C#: How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) in HTML5 Viewer
License and Price. File Formats. PDF. Word. Excel. PowerPoint. Tiff. DNN (Dotnetnuke). Quick to Start. Add a Viewer Control on Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP).
pdf link to email; add a link to a pdf file
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
addTab(_tabRedact); //add Tab "Sample new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.addCSS( new customStyle({ background: "url('RasterEdge_Resource_Files/images
add links to pdf; add a link to a pdf
// Exception in strict mode. Use 'delete this.x' instead
x;                   // Runtime error: x is not defined
We’ll see the 
delete
operator again in §6.3.
4.13.4  The void Operator
void
is a unary operator that appears before its single operand, which may be of any
type. This operator is unusual and infrequently used: it evaluates its operand, then
discards the value and returns 
undefined
. Since the operand value is discarded, using
the 
void
operator makes sense only if the operand has side effects.
The most common use for this operator is in a client-side 
javascript:
URL, where it
allows you to evaluate an expression for its side effects without the browser displaying
the value of the evaluated expression. For example, you might use the 
void
operator in
an HTML 
<a>
tag as follows:
<a href="javascript:void window.open();">Open New Window</a>
This HTML could be more cleanly written using an 
onclick
event handler rather than
javascript:
URL, of course, and the 
void
operator would not be necessary in that case.
4.13.5  The Comma Operator (,)
The comma operator is a binary operator whose operands may be of any type. It eval-
uates its left operand, evaluates its right operand, and then returns the value of the right
operand. Thus, the following line:
i=0, j=1, k=2;
evaluates to 2 and is basically equivalent to:
i = 0; j = 1; k = 2;
The left-hand expression is always evaluated, but its value is discarded, which means
that it only makes sense to use the comma operator when the left-hand expression has
side effects. The only situation in which the comma operator is commonly used is with
for
loop (§5.5.3) that has multiple loop variables:
// The first comma below is part of the syntax of the var statement
// The second comma is the comma operator: it lets us squeeze 2
// expressions (i++ and j--) into a statement (the for loop) that expects 1.
for(var i=0,j=10; i < j; i++,j--)
console.log(i+j);
4.13  Miscellaneous Operators | 85
Core JavaScript
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
C# Image: How to Download Image from URL in C# Project with .NET
Add this imaging library to your C#.NET project jpeg / jpg, or bmp image from a URL to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
adding an email link to a pdf; add links to pdf online
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
change link in pdf; pdf links
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
add hyperlink pdf document; adding a link to a pdf
CHAPTER 5
Statements
Chapter 4 described expressions as JavaScript phrases. By that analogy, statements are
JavaScript sentences or commands. Just as English sentences are terminated and
separated from each other with periods, JavaScript statements are terminated with
semicolons (§2.5). Expressions are evaluated to produce a value, but statements are
executed to make something happen.
One way to “make something happen” is to evaluate an expression that has side effects.
Expressions with side effects, such as assignments and function invocations, can stand
alone as statements, and when used this way they are known as expression state-
ments. A similar category of statements are the declaration statements that declare new
variables and define new functions.
JavaScript programs are nothing more than a sequence of statements to execute. By
default, the JavaScript interpreter executes these statements one after another in the
order they are written. Another way to “make something happen” is to alter this default
order of execution, and JavaScript has a number of statements or control structures that
do just this:
• Conditionals are statements like 
if
and 
switch
that make the JavaScript interpreter
execute or skip other statements depending on the value of an expression.
• Loops are statements like 
while
and 
for
that execute other statements repetitively.
• Jumps are statements like 
break
return
, and 
throw
that cause the interpreter to
jump to another part of the program.
The sections that follow describe the various statements in JavaScript and explain their
syntax. Table 5-1, at the end of the chapter, summarizes the syntax. A JavaScript pro-
gram is simply a sequence of statements, separated from one another with semicolons,
so once you are familiar with the statements of JavaScript, you can begin writing Java-
Script programs.
87
Download from Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
add email link to pdf; pdf email link
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Download and Save Image from Web URL
Apart from image downloading from web URL, RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK still dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add page number to pdf hyperlink; add hyperlink in pdf
5.1  Expression Statements
The simplest kinds of statements in JavaScript are expressions that have side effects.
(But see §5.7.3 for an important expression statement without side effects.) This sort
of statement was shown in Chapter 4. Assignment statements are one major category
of expression statements. For example:
greeting = "Hello " + name;
i *= 3;
The increment and decrement operators, 
++
and 
--
, are related to assignment state-
ments. These have the side effect of changing a variable value, just as if an assignment
had been performed:
counter++;
The 
delete
operator has the important side effect of deleting an object property. Thus,
it is almost always used as a statement, rather than as part of a larger expression:
delete o.x;
Function calls are another major category of expression statements. For example:
alert(greeting);
window.close();
These client-side function calls are expressions, but they have side effects that affect
the web browser and are used here as statements. If a function does not have any side
effects, there is no sense in calling it, unless it is part of a larger expression or an as-
signment statement. For example, you wouldn’t just compute a cosine and discard
the result:
Math.cos(x);
But you might well compute the value and assign it to a variable for future use:
cx = Math.cos(x);
Note that each line of code in each of these examples is terminated with a semicolon.
5.2  Compound and Empty Statements
Just as the comma operator (§4.13.5) combines multiple expressions into a single
expression, a statement block combines multiple statements into a single compound
statement. A statement block is simply a sequence of statements enclosed within curly
braces. Thus, the following lines act as a single statement and can be used anywhere
that JavaScript expects a single statement:
{
x = Math.PI;
cx = Math.cos(x);
console.log("cos(π) = " + cx);
}
88 | Chapter 5: Statements
There are a few things to note about this statement block. First, it does not end with a
semicolon. The primitive statements within the block end in semicolons, but the block
itself does not. Second, the lines inside the block are indented relative to the curly braces
that enclose them. This is optional, but it makes the code easier to read and understand.
Finally, recall that JavaScript does not have block scope and variables declared within
a statement block are not private to the block (see §3.10.1 for details).
Combining statements into larger statement blocks is extremely common in JavaScript
programming. Just as expressions often contain subexpressions, many JavaScript state-
ments contain substatements. Formally, JavaScript syntax usually allows a single sub-
statement. For example, the 
while
loop syntax includes a single statement that serves
as the body of the loop. Using a statement block, you can place any number of state-
ments within this single allowed substatement.
A compound statement allows you to use multiple statements where JavaScript syntax
expects a single statement. The empty statement is the opposite: it allows you to include
no statements where one is expected. The empty statement looks like this:
;
The JavaScript interpreter takes no action when it executes an empty statement. The
empty statement is occasionally useful when you want to create a loop that has an
empty body. Consider the following 
for
loop (
for
loops will be covered in §5.5.3):
// Initialize an array a
for(i = 0; i < a.length; a[i++] = 0) ;
In this loop, all the work is done by the expression 
a[i++] = 0
, and no loop body is
necessary. JavaScript syntax requires a statement as a loop body, however, so an empty
statement—just a bare semicolon—is used.
Note that the accidental inclusion of a semicolon after the right parenthesis of a 
for
loop, 
while
loop, or 
if
statement can cause frustrating bugs that are difficult to detect.
For example, the following code probably does not do what the author intended:
if ((a == 0) || (b == 0));   // Oops! This line does nothing...
o = null;                // and this line is always executed.
When you intentionally use the empty statement, it is a good idea to comment your
code in a way that makes it clear that you are doing it on purpose. For example:
for(i = 0; i < a.length; a[i++] = 0) /* empty */ ;
5.3  Declaration Statements
The 
var
and 
function
are declaration statements—they declare or define variables and
functions. These statements define identifiers (variable and function names) that can
be used elsewhere in your program and assign values to those identifiers. Declaration
statements don’t do much themselves, but by creating variables and functions they, in
an important sense, define the meaning of the other statements in your program.
5.3  Declaration Statements | 89
Core JavaScript
The subsections that follow explain the 
var
statement and the 
function
statement, but
do not cover variables and functions comprehensively. See §3.9 and §3.10 for more on
variables. And see Chapter 8 for complete details on functions.
5.3.1  var
The 
var
statement declares a variable or variables. Here’s the syntax:
var name_1 [ = value_1] [ ,..., name_n [= value_n]]
The 
var
keyword is followed by a comma-separated list of variables to declare; each
variable in the list may optionally have an initializer expression that specifies its initial
value. For example:
var i;                                        // One simple variable
var j = 0;                                    // One var, one value
var p, q;                                     // Two variables
var greeting = "hello" + name;                // A complex initializer
var x = 2.34, y = Math.cos(0.75), r, theta;   // Many variables
var x = 2, y = x*x;                           // Second var uses the first
var x = 2,                                    // Multiple variables...
f = function(x) { return x*x },           // each on its own line
y = f(x);
If a 
var
statement appears within the body of a function, it defines local variables,
scoped to that function. When 
var
is used in top-level code, it declares global variables,
visible throughout the JavaScript program. As noted in §3.10.2, global variables are
properties of the global object. Unlike other global properties, however, properties
created with 
var
cannot be deleted.
If no initializer is specified for a variable with the 
var
statement, the variable’s initial
value is 
undefined
. As described in §3.10.1, variables are defined throughout the script
or function in which they are declared—their declaration is “hoisted” up to the start
of the script or function. Initialization, however, occurs at the location of the 
var
state-
ment, and the value of the variable is 
undefined
before that point in the code.
Note that the 
var
statement can also appear as part of the 
for
and 
for/in
loops. (These
variables are hoisted, just like variables declared outside of a loop.) Here are examples
repeated from §3.9:
for(var i = 0; i < 10; i++) console.log(i);
for(var i = 0, j=10; i < 10; i++,j--) console.log(i*j);
for(var i in o) console.log(i);
Note that it is harmless to declare the same variable multiple times.
90 | Chapter 5: Statements
5.3.2  function
The 
function
keyword is used to define functions. We saw it in function definition
expressions in §4.3. It can also be used in statement form. Consider the following two
functions:
var f = function(x) { return x+1; }  // Expression assigned to a variable
function f(x) { return x+1; }        // Statement includes variable name
A function declaration statement has the following syntax:
function funcname([arg1 [, arg2 [..., argn]]]) {
statements
}
funcname
is an identifier that names the function being declared. The function name is
followed by a comma-separated list of parameter names in parentheses. These identi-
fiers can be used within the body of the function to refer to the argument values passed
when the function is invoked.
The body of the function is composed of any number of JavaScript statements, con-
tained within curly braces. These statements are not executed when the function is
defined. Instead, they are associated with the new function object for execution when
the function is invoked. Note that the curly braces are a required part of the 
function
statement. Unlike statement blocks used with 
while
loops and other statements, a
function body requires curly braces, even if the body consists of only a single statement.
Here are some more examples of function declarations:
function hypotenuse(x, y) {
return Math.sqrt(x*x + y*y);  // return is documented in the next section
}
function factorial(n) {           // A recursive function
if (n <= 1) return 1;
return n * factorial(n - 1);
}
Function declaration statements may appear in top-level JavaScript code, or they may
be nested within other functions. When nested, however, function declarations may
only appear at the top level of the function they are nested within. That is, function
definitions may not appear within 
if
statements, 
while
loops, or any other statements.
Because of this restriction on where function declarations may appear, the ECMAScript
specification does not categorize function declarations as true statements. Some Java-
Script implementations do allow function declarations to appear anywhere a statement
can appear, but different implementations handle the details differently and placing
function declarations within other statements is nonportable.
Function declaration statements differ from function definition expressions in that they
include a function name. Both forms create a new function object, but the function
declaration statement also declares the function name as a variable and assigns the
function object to it. Like variables declared with 
var
, functions defined with function
5.3  Declaration Statements | 91
Core JavaScript
definition statements are implicitly “hoisted” to the top of the containing script or
function, so that they are visible throughout the script or function. With 
var
, only the
variable declaration is hoisted—the variable initialization code remains where you
placed it. With function declaration statements, however, both the function name and
the function body are hoisted: all functions in a script or all nested functions in a func-
tion are declared before any other code is run. This means that you can invoke a Java-
Script function before you declare it.
Like the 
var
statement, function declaration statements create variables that cannot be
deleted. These variables are not read-only, however, and their value can be overwritten.
5.4  Conditionals
Conditional statements execute or skip other statements depending on the value of a
specified expression. These statements are the decision points of your code, and they
are also sometimes known as “branches.” If you imagine a JavaScript interpreter fol-
lowing a path through your code, the conditional statements are the places where the
code branches into two or more paths and the interpreter must choose which path to
follow.
The subsections below explain JavaScript’s basic conditional, the 
if/else
statement,
and also cover 
switch
, a more complicated multiway branch statement.
5.4.1  if
The 
if
statement is the fundamental control statement that allows JavaScript to make
decisions, or, more precisely, to execute statements conditionally. This statement has
two forms. The first is:
if (expression)
statement
In this form, 
expression
is evaluated. If the resulting value is truthy, 
statement
is exe-
cuted. If 
expression
is falsy, 
statement
is not executed. (See §3.3 for a definition of
truthy and falsy values.) For example:
if (username == null)       // If username is null or undefined,
username = "John Doe";  // define it
Or similarly:
// If username is null, undefined, false, 0, "", or NaN, give it a new value
if (!username) username = "John Doe";
Note that the parentheses around the 
expression
are a required part of the syntax for
the 
if
statement.
JavaScript syntax requires a single statement after the 
if
keyword and parenthesized
expression, but you can use a statement block to combine multiple statements into
one. So the 
if
statement might also look like this:
92 | Chapter 5: Statements
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested