open pdf and draw c# : Add email link to pdf application software cloud windows html asp.net class %5BO%60Reilly%5D%20-%20JavaScript.%20The%20Definitive%20Guide,%206th%20ed.%20-%20%5BFlanagan%5D11-part1539

if (!address) {
address = "";
message = "Please specify a mailing address.";
}
The second form of the 
if
statement introduces an 
else
clause that is executed when
expression
is 
false
. Its syntax is:
if (expression)
statement1
else
statement2
This form of the statement executes 
statement1
if 
expression
is truthy and executes
statement2
if 
expression
is falsy. For example:
if (n == 1) 
console.log("You have 1 new message.");
else
console.log("You have " + n + " new messages.");
When you have nested 
if
statements with 
else
clauses, some caution is required to
ensure that the 
else
clause goes with the appropriate 
if
statement. Consider the fol-
lowing lines:
i = j = 1;
k = 2;
if (i == j)
if (j == k)
console.log("i equals k");
else
console.log("i doesn't equal j");    // WRONG!!
In this example, the inner 
if
statement forms the single statement allowed by the syntax
of the outer 
if
statement. Unfortunately, it is not clear (except from the hint given by
the indentation) which 
if
the 
else
goes with. And in this example, the indentation is
wrong, because a JavaScript interpreter actually interprets the previous example as:
if (i == j) {
if (j == k)
console.log("i equals k");
else
console.log("i doesn't equal j");    // OOPS!
}
The rule in JavaScript (as in most programming languages) is that by default an 
else
clause is part of the nearest 
if
statement. To make this example less ambiguous and
easier to read, understand, maintain, and debug, you should use curly braces:
if (i == j) {
if (j == k) {
console.log("i equals k");
}
}
else {  // What a difference the location of a curly brace makes!
5.4  Conditionals | 93
Core JavaScript
Add email link to pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add links to pdf in preview; clickable pdf links
Add email link to pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; pdf link open in new window
console.log("i doesn't equal j");
}
Although it is not the style used in this book, many programmers make a habit of
enclosing the bodies of 
if
and 
else
statements (as well as other compound statements,
such as 
while
loops) within curly braces, even when the body consists of only a single
statement. Doing so consistently can prevent the sort of problem just shown.
5.4.2  else if
The 
if/else
statement evaluates an expression and executes one of two pieces of code,
depending on the outcome. But what about when you need to execute one of many
pieces of code? One way to do this is with an 
else if
statement. 
else if
is not really
a JavaScript statement, but simply a frequently used programming idiom that results
when repeated 
if/else
statements are used:
if (n == 1) {
// Execute code block #1
}
else if (n == 2) {
// Execute code block #2
}
else if (n == 3) {
// Execute code block #3
}
else {
// If all else fails, execute block #4
}
There is nothing special about this code. It is just a series of 
if
statements, where each
following 
if
is part of the 
else
clause of the previous statement. Using the 
else if
idiom
is preferable to, and more legible than, writing these statements out in their syntactically
equivalent, fully nested form:
if (n == 1) {
// Execute code block #1
}
else {
if (n == 2) {
// Execute code block #2
}
else {
if (n == 3) {
// Execute code block #3
}
else {
// If all else fails, execute block #4
}
}
}
94 | Chapter 5: Statements
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
copy and email the secure download link to the assistance, please contact us via email (support@rasteredge & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
adding hyperlinks to pdf files; add url to pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Create PDF file from PowerPoint free online without email. Add necessary references
pdf link to attached file; adding hyperlinks to pdf documents
5.4.3  switch
An 
if
statement causes a branch in the flow of a program’s execution, and you can use
the 
else if
idiom to perform a multiway branch. This is not the best solution, however,
when all of the branches depend on the value of the same expression. In this case, it is
wasteful to repeatedly evaluate that expression in multiple 
if
statements.
The 
switch
statement handles exactly this situation. The 
switch
keyword is followed
by an expression in parentheses and a block of code in curly braces:
switch(expression) {
statements
}
However, the full syntax of a 
switch
statement is more complex than this. Various
locations in the block of code are labeled with the 
case
keyword followed by an ex-
pression and a colon. 
case
is like a labeled statement, except that instead of giving the
labeled statement a name, it associates an expression with the statement. When a
switch
executes, it computes the value of 
expression
and then looks for a 
case
label
whose expression evaluates to the same value (where sameness is determined by the
===
operator). If it finds one, it starts executing the block of code at the statement labeled
by the 
case
. If it does not find a 
case
with a matching value, it looks for a statement
labeled 
default:
. If there is no 
default:
label, the 
switch
statement skips the block of
code altogether.
switch
is a confusing statement to explain; its operation becomes much clearer with an
example. The following 
switch
statement is equivalent to the repeated 
if/else
state-
ments shown in the previous section:
switch(n) {
case 1:                      // Start here if n == 1
// Execute code block #1.
break; 
// Stop here
case 2:                      // Start here if n == 2
// Execute code block #2.
break;                     // Stop here
case 3:                      // Start here if n == 3
// Execute code block #3.
break;                     // Stop here
default:                     // If all else fails...
// Execute code block #4.
break;                     // stop here
}
Note the 
break
keyword used at the end of each 
case
in the code above. The 
break
statement, described later in this chapter, causes the interpreter to jump to the end (or
“break out”) of the 
switch
statement and continue with the statement that follows it.
The 
case
clauses in a 
switch
statement specify only the starting point of the desired
code; they do not specify any ending point. In the absence of 
break
statements, a
switch
statement begins executing its block of code at the 
case
label that matches the
5.4  Conditionals | 95
Core JavaScript
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Free online Word to PDF converter without email. Add necessary references:
add url link to pdf; check links in pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Convert Excel to PDF document free online without email. Add necessary references:
adding an email link to a pdf; add hyperlink to pdf in
value of its 
expression
and continues executing statements until it reaches the end of
the block. On rare occasions, it is useful to write code like this that “falls through” from
one 
case
label to the next, but 99 percent of the time you should be careful to end every
case
with a 
break
statement. (When using 
switch
inside a function, however, you may
use a 
return
statement instead of a 
break
statement. Both serve to terminate the
switch
statement and prevent execution from falling through to the next 
case
.)
Here is a more realistic example of the 
switch
statement; it converts a value to a string
in a way that depends on the type of the value:
function convert(x) {
switch(typeof x) {
case 'number':            // Convert the number to a hexadecimal integer
return x.toString(16);
case 'string':            // Return the string enclosed in quotes
return '"' + x + '"';
default:                  // Convert any other type in the usual way
return String(x);
}
}
Note that in the two previous examples, the 
case
keywords are followed by number
and string literals, respectively. This is how the 
switch
statement is most often used in
practice, but note that the ECMAScript standard allows each 
case
to be followed by an
arbitrary expression.
The 
switch
statement first evaluates the expression that follows the 
switch
keyword
and then evaluates the 
case
expressions, in the order in which they appear, until it finds
a value that matches.
1
The matching case is determined using the 
===
identity operator,
not the 
==
equality operator, so  the expressions must match without any type
conversion.
Because not all of the 
case
expressions are evaluated each time the 
switch
statement is
executed, you should avoid using 
case
expressions that contain side effects such as
function calls or assignments. The safest course is simply to limit your 
case
expressions
to constant expressions.
As explained earlier, if none of the 
case
expressions match the 
switch
expression, the
switch
statement begins executing its body at the statement labeled 
default:
. If there
is no 
default:
label, the 
switch
statement skips its body altogether. Note that in the
examples above, the 
default:
label appears at the end of the 
switch
body, following all
the 
case
labels. This is a logical and common place for it, but it can actually appear
anywhere within the body of the statement.
1. The fact that the 
case
expressions are evaluated at run-time makes the JavaScript 
switch
statement much
different from (and less efficient than) the 
switch
statement of C, C++, and Java. In those languages, the
case
expressions must be compile-time constants of the same type, and 
switch
statements can often
compile down to highly efficient jump tables.
96 | Chapter 5: Statements
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Create editable Word file online without email. C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
pdf reader link; add hyperlink to pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. In order to convert PDF document to Word file using VB.NET programming code, you have to Add necessary references
add page number to pdf hyperlink; add links to pdf file
5.5  Loops
To understand conditional statements, we imagined the JavaScript interpreter follow-
ing a branching path through your source code. The looping statements are those that
bend that path back upon itself to repeat portions of your code. JavaScript has four
looping statements: 
while
do/while
for
, and 
for/in
. The subsections below explain
each in turn. One common use for loops is to iterate over the elements of an array.
§7.6 discusses this kind of loop in detail and covers special looping methods defined
by the Array class.
5.5.1  while
Just as the 
if
statement is JavaScript’s basic conditional, the 
while
statement is Java-
Script’s basic loop. It has the following syntax:
while (expression)
statement
To execute a 
while
statement, the interpreter first evaluates 
expression
. If the value of
the expression is falsy, then the interpreter skips over the 
statement
that serves as the
loop body and moves on to the next statement in the program. If, on the other hand,
the 
expression
is truthy, the interpreter executes the 
statement
and repeats, jumping
back to the top of the loop and evaluating 
expression
again. Another way to say this is
that the interpreter executes 
statement
repeatedly while the 
expression
is truthy. Note
that you can create an infinite loop with the syntax 
while(true)
.
Usually, you do not want JavaScript to perform exactly the same operation over and
over again. In almost every loop, one or more variables change with each iteration of
the loop. Since the variables change, the actions performed by executing 
statement
may
differ each time through the loop. Furthermore, if the changing variable or variables
are involved in 
expression
, the value of the expression may be different each time
through the loop. This is important; otherwise, an expression that starts off truthy
would never change, and the loop would never end! Here is an example of a 
while
loop
that prints the numbers from 0 to 9:
var count = 0;
while (count < 10) {
console.log(count);
count++;
}
As you can see, the variable 
count
starts off at 0 and is incremented each time the body
of the loop runs. Once the loop has executed 10 times, the expression becomes 
false
(i.e., the variable 
count
is no longer less than 10), the 
while
statement finishes, and the
interpreter can move on to the next statement in the program. Many loops have a
counter variable like 
count
. The variable names 
i
j
, and 
k
are commonly used as loop
counters, though you should use more descriptive names if it makes your code easier
to understand.
5.5  Loops | 97
Core JavaScript
RasterEdge Product Renewal and Update
VB.NET Write: Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value 4. Order email. Our support team will send you the purchase link.
adding links to pdf in preview; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Free online PowerPoint to PDF converter without email. C#.NET Demo Code: Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET Application. Add necessary references:
add links to pdf online; add hyperlink pdf
5.5.2  do/while
The 
do/while
loop is like a 
while
loop, except that the loop expression is tested at the
bottom of the loop rather than at the top. This means that the body of the loop is always
executed at least once. The syntax is:
do
statement
while (expression);
The 
do/while
loop is less commonly used than its 
while
cousin—in practice, it is some-
what uncommon to be certain that you want a loop to execute at least once. Here’s an
example of a 
do/while
loop:
function printArray(a) {
var len = a.length, i = 0;
if (len == 0)
console.log("Empty Array");
else {
do {
console.log(a[i]);
} while (++i < len);
}
}
There are a couple of syntactic differences between the 
do/while
loop and the ordinary
while
loop. First, the 
do
loop requires both the 
do
keyword (to mark the beginning of
the loop) and the 
while
keyword (to mark the end and introduce the loop condition).
Also, the 
do
loop must always be terminated with a semicolon. The 
while
loop doesn’t
need a semicolon if the loop body is enclosed in curly braces.
5.5.3  for
The 
for
statement provides a looping construct that is often more convenient than the
while
statement. The 
for
statement simplifies loops that follow a common pattern.
Most loops have a counter variable of some kind. This variable is initialized before the
loop starts and is tested before each iteration of the loop. Finally, the counter variable
is incremented or otherwise updated at the end of the loop body, just before the variable
is tested again. In this kind of loop, the initialization, the test, and the update are the
three crucial manipulations of a loop variable. The 
for
statement encodes each of these
three manipulations as an expression and makes those expressions an explicit part
of the loop syntax:
for(initialize ; test ; increment)
statement
initialize
test
, and 
increment
are three expressions (separated by semicolons) that
are responsible for initializing, testing, and incrementing the loop variable. Putting
them all in the first line of the loop makes it easy to understand what a 
for
loop is doing
and prevents mistakes such as forgetting to initialize or increment the loop variable.
98 | Chapter 5: Statements
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
to PDF converter without email. Quick integrate online C# source code into .NET class. C# Demo Code: Convert Excel to PDF in Visual C# .NET Project. Add necessary
add hyperlink to pdf in preview; add link to pdf
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Free online Word to PDF converter without email. C#.NET Sample Code: Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
add link to pdf acrobat; pdf links
The simplest way to explain how a 
for
loop works is to show the equivalent 
while
loop
2
:
initialize;
while(test) {
statement
increment;
}
In other words, the 
initialize
expression is evaluated once, before the loop begins.
To be useful, this expression must have side effects (usually an assignment). JavaScript
also allows 
initialize
to be a 
var
variable declaration statement so that you can declare
and initialize a loop counter at the same time. The 
test
expression is evaluated before
each iteration and controls whether the body of the loop is executed. If 
test
evaluates
to a truthy value, the 
statement
that is the body of the loop is executed. Finally, the
increment
expression is evaluated. Again, this must be an expression with side effects
in order to be useful. Generally, either it is an assignment expression, or it uses the 
++
or 
--
operators.
We can print the numbers from 0 to 9 with a 
for
loop like the following. Contrast it
with the equivalent 
while
loop shown in the previous section:
for(var count = 0; count < 10; count++)
console.log(count);
Loops can become a lot more complex than this simple example, of course, and some-
times multiple variables change with each iteration of the loop. This situation is the
only place that the comma operator is commonly used in JavaScript; it provides a way
to combine multiple initialization and increment expressions into a single expression
suitable for use in a 
for
loop:
var i,j;
for(i = 0, j = 10 ; i < 10 ; i++, j--)
sum += i * j;
In all our loop examples so far, the loop variable has been numeric. This is quite com-
mon but is not necessary. The following code uses a 
for
loop to traverse a linked list
data structure and return the last object in the list (i.e., the first object that does not
have a 
next
property):
function tail(o) {                          // Return the tail of linked list o
for(; o.next; o = o.next) /* empty */ ; // Traverse while o.next is truthy
return o;
}
Note that the code above has no 
initialize
expression. Any of the three expressions
may be omitted from a 
for
loop, but the two semicolons are required. If you omit the
test
expression, the loop repeats forever, and 
for(;;)
is another way of writing an
infinite loop, like 
while(true)
.
2. When we consider the 
continue
statement in §5.6.3, we’ll see that this 
while
loop is not an exact equivalent
of the 
for
loop.
5.5  Loops | 99
Core JavaScript
5.5.4  for/in
The 
for/in
statement uses the 
for
keyword, but it is a completely different kind of loop
than the regular 
for
loop. A 
for/in
loop looks like this:
for (variable in object)
statement
variable
typically names a variable, but it may be any expression that evaluates to an
lvalue (§4.7.3) or a 
var
statement that declares a single variable—it must be something
suitable as the left side of an assignment expression. 
object
is an expression that eval-
uates to an object. As usual, 
statement
is the statement or statement block that serves
as the body of the loop.
It is easy to use a regular 
for
loop to iterate through the elements of an array:
for(var i = 0; i < a.length; i++)  // Assign array indexes to variable i
console.log(a[i]);             // Print the value of each array element
The 
for/in
loop makes it easy to do the same for the properties of an object:
for(var p in o)        // Assign property names of o to variable p
console.log(o[p]); // Print the value of each property
To execute a 
for/in
statement, the JavaScript interpreter first evaluates the 
object
ex-
pression. If it evaluates to 
null
or 
undefined
, the interpreter skips the loop and moves
on to the next statement.
3
If the expression evaluates to a primitive value, that value is
converted to its equivalent wrapper object (§3.6). Otherwise, the expression is already
an object. The interpreter now executes the body of the loop once for each enumerable
property of the object. Before each iteration, however, the interpreter evaluates the
variable
expression and assigns the name of the property (a string value) to it.
Note that the 
variable
in the 
for/in
loop may be an arbitrary expression, as long as it
evaluates to something suitable for the left side of an assignment. This expression is
evaluated each time through the loop, which means that it may evaluate differently
each time. For example, you can use code like the following to copy the names of all
object properties into an array:
var o = {x:1, y:2, z:3};
var a = [], i = 0;
for(a[i++] in o) /* empty */;
JavaScript arrays are simply a specialized kind of object and array indexes are object
properties that can be enumerated with a 
for/in
loop. For example, following the code
above with this line enumerates the array indexes 0, 1, and 2:
for(i in a) console.log(i);
The 
for/in
loop does not actually enumerate all properties of an object, only the enu-
merable properties (see §6.7). The various built-in methods defined by core JavaScript
are not enumerable. All objects have a 
toString()
method, for example, but the
3. ECMAScript 3 implementations may instead throw a TypeError in this case.
100 | Chapter 5: Statements
for/in
loop does not enumerate this 
toString
property. In addition to built-in methods,
many other properties of the built-in objects are nonenumerable. All properties and
methods defined by your code are enumerable, however. (But in ECMAScript 5, you
can make them nonenumerable using techniques explained in §6.7.) User-defined in-
herited properties (see §6.2.2) are also enumerated by the 
for/in
loop.
If the body of a 
for/in
loop deletes a property that has not yet been enumerated, that
property will not be enumerated. If the body of the loop defines new properties on the
object, those properties will generally not be enumerated. (Some implementations may
enumerate inherited properties that are added after the loop begins, however.)
5.5.4.1  Property enumeration order
The ECMAScript specification does not specify the order in which the 
for/in
loop
enumerates the properties of an object. In practice, however, JavaScript implementa-
tions from all major browser vendors enumerate the properties of simple objects in the
order in which they were defined, with older properties enumerated first. If an object
was created as an object literal, its enumeration order is the same order that the prop-
erties appear in the literal. There are sites and libraries on the Web that rely on this
enumeration order, and browser vendors are unlikely to change it.
The paragraph above specifies  an interoperable property enumeration order for
“simple” objects. Enumeration order becomes implementation dependent (and non-
interoperable) if:
• The object inherits enumerable properties;
• the object has properties that are integer array indexes;
• you have used 
delete
to delete existing properties of the object; or
• you have used 
Object.defineProperty()
(§6.7) or similar methods to alter property
attributes of the object.
Typically (but not in all implementations), inherited properties (see §6.2.2) are enum-
erated after all the noninherited “own” properties of an object, but are also enumerated
in the order in which they were defined. If an object inherits properties from more than
one “prototype” (see §6.1.3)—i.e., if it has more than one object in its “prototype
chain”—then the properties of each prototype object in the chain are enumerated in
creation order before enumerating the properties of the next object. Some (but not all)
implementations enumerate array properties in numeric order rather than creation or-
der, but they revert to creation order if the array is given other non-numeric properties
as well or if the array is sparse (i.e., if some array indexes are missing).
5.5  Loops | 101
Core JavaScript
5.6  Jumps
Another category of JavaScript statements are jump statements. As the name implies,
these cause the JavaScript interpreter to jump to a new location in the source code. The
break
statement makes the interpreter jump to the end of a loop or other statement.
continue
makes the interpreter skip the rest of the body of a loop and jump back to the
top of a loop to begin a new iteration. JavaScript allows statements to be named, or
labeled, and the 
break
and 
continue
can identify the target loop or other statement label.
The 
return
statement makes the interpreter jump from a function invocation back to
the code that invoked it and also supplies the value for the invocation. The 
throw
state-
ment raises, or “throws,” an exception and is designed to work with the 
try/catch/
finally
statement, which establishes a block of exception handling code. This is a
complicated kind of jump statement: when an exception is thrown, the interpreter
jumps to the nearest enclosing exception handler, which may be in the same function
or up the call stack in an invoking function.
Details of each of these jump statements are in the sections that follow.
5.6.1  Labeled Statements
Any statement may be labeled by preceding it with an identifier and a colon:
identifier: statement
By labeling a statement, you give it a name that you can use to refer to it elsewhere in
your program. You can label any statement, although it is only useful to label statements
that have bodies, such as loops and conditionals. By giving a loop a name, you can use
break
and 
continue
statements inside the body of the loop to exit the loop or to jump
directly to the top of the loop to begin the next iteration. 
break
and 
continue
are the
only JavaScript statements that use statement labels; they are covered later in this
chapter. Here is an example of a labeled 
while
loop and a 
continue
statement that uses
the label.
mainloop: while(token != null) {
// Code omitted...
continue mainloop;  // Jump to the next iteration of the named loop
// More code omitted...
}
The 
identifier
you use to label a statement can be any legal JavaScript identifier that
is not a reserved word. The namespace for labels is different than the namespace for
variables and functions, so you can use the same identifier as a statement label and as
a variable or function name. Statement labels are defined only within the statement to
which they apply (and within its substatements, of course). A statement may not have
the same label as a statement that contains it, but two statements may have the same
label as long as neither one is nested within the other. Labeled statements may them-
selves be labeled. Effectively, this means that any statement may have multiple labels.
102 | Chapter 5: Statements
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested