open pdf and draw c# : C# read pdf from url control SDK platform web page wpf winforms web browser %5BO%60Reilly%5D%20-%20JavaScript.%20The%20Definitive%20Guide,%206th%20ed.%20-%20%5BFlanagan%5D13-part1541

Statement Syntax
Purpose
use strict
"use strict";
Apply strict mode restrictions to script or function
var
var name [ = expr] [ ,... ];
Declare and initialize one or more variables
while
while (expression) statement
A basic loop construct
with
with (object) statement
Extend the scope chain (forbidden in strict mode)
5.8  Summary of JavaScript Statements | 113
Core JavaScript
C# read pdf from url - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
chrome pdf from link; clickable links in pdf
C# read pdf from url - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding links to pdf document; convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
adding links to pdf; active links in pdf
C#: How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) in HTML5 Viewer
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET C# HTML5 Viewer: Open a File from a URL.
clickable pdf links; adding an email link to a pdf
CHAPTER 6
Objects
JavaScript’s fundamental datatype is the object. An object is a composite value: it ag-
gregates multiple values (primitive values or other objects) and allows you to store and
retrieve those values by name. An object is an unordered collection of properties, each
of which has a name and a value. Property names are strings, so we can say that objects
map strings to values. This string-to-value  mapping goes by  various names: you  are
probably already familiar with the fundamental data structure under the name “hash,”
“hashtable,” “dictionary,” or “associative array.” An object is more than a simple string-
to-value map, however. In addition to maintaining its own set of properties, a JavaScript
object  also  inherits the properties  of  another object,  known  as  its “prototype.”  The
methods  of an  object  are typically  inherited properties, and this  “prototypal  inheri-
tance” is a key feature of JavaScript.
JavaScript  objects are  dynamic—properties  can  usually  be  added  and  deleted—but
they  can be  used  to  simulate the  static  objects and “structs”  of  statically typed lan-
guages. They can also be used (by ignoring the value part of the string-to-value map-
ping) to represent sets of strings.
Any value in JavaScript that is not a string, a number, 
true
false
null
, or 
undefined
is an  object. And  even though strings,  numbers,  and booleans are not  objects,  they
behave like immutable objects (see §3.6).
Recall from §3.7 that objects are mutable and are manipulated by reference rather than
by value. If the variable 
x
refers to an object, and the code 
var y = x;
is executed, the
variable 
y
holds a reference to the same object, not a copy of that object. Any modifi-
cations made to the object through the variable 
y
are also visible through the variable 
x
.
The most common things to do with objects are create them and to set, query, delete,
test, and enumerate their properties. These fundamental operations  are described in
the opening  sections of this chapter. The  sections  that  follow  cover  more  advanced
topics, many of which are specific to ECMAScript 5.
A property has a name and a value. A property name may be any string, including the
empty string, but no object may have two properties with the same name. The value
115
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer, Create Web Doc & Image Viewer in C#.NET
Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET C# Demo Codes for PDF Conversions. 2. Add web document viewer into your C# project aspx web page.
add hyperlink pdf document; add url pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
VB.NET OCR, VB.NET Twain, VB.NET Barcode Read, VB.NET C# PDF - View PDF Online with C#.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Able to load PDF document from file formats and url.
add link to pdf acrobat; add hyperlinks to pdf online
may be any JavaScript value, or (in ECMAScript 5) it may be a getter or a setter function
(or both). We’ll learn about getter and setter functions in §6.6. In addition to its name
and value, each property has associated values that we’ll call property attributes:
• The writable attribute specifies whether the value of the property can be set.
• The  enumerable  attribute specifies whether the  property name  is  returned  by  a
for/in
loop.
• The  configurable  attribute  specifies  whether  the  property  can  be  deleted  and
whether its attributes can be altered.
Prior  to  ECMAScript  5, all  properties in  objects  created  by  your  code  are  writable,
enumerable, and configurable. In ECMAScript 5, you can configure the attributes of
your properties. §6.7 explains how to do this.
In addition to its properties, every object has three associated object attributes:
• An object’s  prototype is  a reference  to another object from  which properties are
inherited.
• An object’s class is a string that categorizes the type of an object.
• An object’s extensible flag specifies (in ECMAScript 5) whether new properties may
be added to the object.
We’ll learn more about prototypes and property inheritance in §6.1.3 and §6.2.2, and
we will cover all three attributes in more detail in §6.8.
Finally, here are some terms we’ll use to distinguish among three broad categories of
JavaScript objects and two types of properties:
• A native object is an object or class of objects defined by the ECMAScript specifi-
cation. Arrays, functions, dates, and regular expressions (for example) are native
objects.
• A host object is an object defined by the host environment (such as a web browser)
within which the JavaScript interpreter is embedded. The HTMLElement objects
that represent the structure of a web page in client-side JavaScript are host objects.
Host objects may  also  be  native objects,  as  when the  host  environment defines
methods that are normal JavaScript Function objects.
• A user-defined object is any object created by the execution of JavaScript code.
• An own property is a property defined directly on an object.
• An inherited property is a property defined by an object’s prototype object.
6.1  Creating Objects
Objects  can  be  created  with  object  literals,  with  the 
new
keyword,  and  (in
ECMAScript  5)  with  the 
Object.create()
function.  The  subsections  below describe
each technique.
116 | Chapter 6: Objects
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. A powerful C#.NET PDF control compatible with windows operating system and built on .NET framework.
add hyperlink to pdf online; add a link to a pdf file
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. Best C#.NET PDF text extraction library and component for free download.
convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks; convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks
6.1.1  Object Literals
The easiest way to create an object is to include an object literal in your JavaScript code.
An object literal  is  a  comma-separated  list  of  colon-separated  name:value pairs, en-
closed within curly braces. A property name is a JavaScript identifier or a string literal
(the empty string is allowed). A property value is any JavaScript expression; the value
of the expression (it may be a primitive value or an object value) becomes the value of
the property. Here are some examples:
var empty = {};                           // An object with no properties
var point = { x:0, y:0 };                 // Two properties
var point2 = { x:point.x, y:point.y+1 };  // More complex values
var book = {                      
"main title": "JavaScript",           // Property names include spaces,
'sub-title': "The Definitive Guide",  // and hyphens, so use string literals
"for": "all audiences",               // for is a reserved word, so quote
author: {                             // The value of this property is
firstname: "David",               // itself an object.  Note that
surname: "Flanagan"               // these property names are unquoted.
}
};
In ECMAScript 5 (and some ECMAScript 3 implementations), reserved words may be
used as property names without quoting. In general, however, property names that are
reserved words must be quoted in ECMAScript 3. In ECMAScript 5, a trailing comma
following the last property in an object literal is ignored. Trailing commas are ignored
in most ECMAScript 3 implementations, but IE considers them an error.
An object literal is an expression that creates and initializes a new and distinct object
each time it is evaluated. The value of each property is evaluated each time the literal
is evaluated.  This means that a single object literal can create  many new objects if it
appears within the body of a loop in a function that is called repeatedly, and that the
property values of these objects may differ from each other.
6.1.2  Creating Objects with new
The 
new
operator creates and initializes a new object. The 
new
keyword must be followed
by a function invocation. A function used in this way is called a constructor and serves
to initialize a newly created object. Core JavaScript includes built-in constructors for
native types. For example:
var o = new Object();     // Create an empty object: same as {}.
var a = new Array();      // Create an empty array: same as [].
var d = new Date();       // Create a Date object representing the current time
var r = new RegExp("js"); // Create a RegExp object for pattern matching.
In addition to these built-in constructors, it is common to define your own constructor
functions to initialize newly created objects. Doing so is covered in Chapter 9.
6.1  Creating Objects | 117
Core JavaScript
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit
pdf link; adding a link to a pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add hyperlink to pdf in preview; add link to pdf
6.1.3  Prototypes
Before we can cover the third object creation technique, we must pause for a moment
to explain prototypes. Every JavaScript object has a second JavaScript object (or 
null
,
but this is rare) associated with it. This second object is known as a prototype, and the
first object inherits properties from the prototype.
All objects created by object literals have the same prototype object, and we can refer
to this prototype object in JavaScript code as 
Object.prototype
. Objects created using
the 
new
keyword and a constructor invocation use the value of the 
prototype
property
of the constructor function as their prototype. So the object created by 
new Object()
inherits  from 
Object.prototype
just  as  the  object  created  by 
{}
does.  Similarly,  the
object  created by 
new Array()
uses 
Array.prototype
as its  prototype, and the object
created by 
new Date()
uses 
Date.prototype
as its prototype.
Object.prototype
is one of the rare objects that has no prototype: it does not inherit
any properties. Other prototype objects are normal objects that do have a prototype.
All of the built-in constructors (and most user-defined constructors) have a prototype
that inherits from 
Object.prototype
. For example, 
Date.prototype
inherits properties
from 
Object.prototype
, so a Date object created by 
new Date()
inherits properties from
both 
Date.prototype
and 
Object.prototype
. This linked series of prototype objects is
known as a prototype chain.
An explanation of how property  inheritance works is  in §6.2.2. We’ll learn how to
query  the  prototype  of  an object in §6.8.1.  And Chapter 9  explains  the connection
between  prototypes  and  constructors  in  more  detail:  it  shows  how  to  define  new
“classes” of objects by writing a constructor function and setting its 
prototype
property
to the prototype object to be used by the “instances” created with that constructor.
6.1.4  Object.create()
ECMAScript 5 defines a method, 
Object.create()
, that creates a new object, using its
first argument as the prototype of that object. 
Object.create()
also takes an optional
second argument that describes the properties of the new object. This second argument
is covered in §6.7.
Object.create()
is a static function, not a method invoked on individual objects. To
use it, simply pass the desired prototype object:
var o1 = Object.create({x:1, y:2});       // o1 inherits properties x and y.
You can pass 
null
to create a new object that does not have a prototype, but if you do
this,  the newly  created object  will  not inherit  anything, not  even  basic methods  like
toString()
(which means it won’t work with the 
+
operator either):
var o2 = Object.create(null);             // o2 inherits no props or methods.
118 | Chapter 6: Objects
Download from Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
If you want to create an ordinary empty object (like the object returned by 
{}
or 
new
Object()
), pass 
Object.prototype
:
var o3 = Object.create(Object.prototype); // o3 is like {} or new Object().
The ability to create a new object with an arbitrary prototype  (put  another way: the
ability to create an “heir” for any object) is a powerful one, and we can simulate it in
ECMAScript 3 with a function like the one in Example 6-1.
1
Example 6-1. Creating a new object that inherits from a prototype
// inherit() returns a newly created object that inherits properties from the
// prototype object p.  It uses the ECMAScript 5 function Object.create() if
// it is defined, and otherwise falls back to an older technique.
function inherit(p) {
if (p == null) throw TypeError(); // p must be a non-null object
if (Object.create)                // If Object.create() is defined...
return Object.create(p);      //    then just use it.
var t = typeof p;                 // Otherwise do some more type checking
if (t !== "object" && t !== "function") throw TypeError();
function f() {};                  // Define a dummy constructor function.
f.prototype = p;                  // Set its prototype property to p.
return new f();                   // Use f() to create an "heir" of p.
}
The  code in the 
inherit()
function will  make more sense  after  we’ve covered  con-
structors in Chapter 9. For  now,  please  just  accept that it returns a  new object that
inherits the  properties  of  the  argument object. Note  that 
inherit()
is not  a full  re-
placement for 
Object.create()
: it does not allow the creation of objects with 
null
pro-
totypes,  and it  does  not  accept the  optional  second  argument  that 
Object.create()
does. Nevertheless, we’ll use 
inherit()
in a number of examples in this chapter and
again in Chapter 9.
One use for our 
inherit()
function is when you want to guard against unintended (but
nonmalicious) modification of an object by a library function that you don’t have con-
trol over. Instead of passing the object directly to the function, you can pass an heir. If
the function reads properties of the heir, it will see the inherited values. If it sets prop-
erties, however, those properties will only affect the heir, not your original object:
var o = { x: "don't change this value" };
library_function(inherit(o));  // Guard against accidental modifications of o
To understand why this works, you need to know how properties are queried and set
in JavaScript. These are the topics of the next section.
1. Douglas Crockford is generally credited as the first to propose a function that creates objects in this way.
See http://javascript.crockford.com/prototypal.html.
6.1  Creating Objects | 119
Core JavaScript
6.2  Querying and Setting Properties
To  obtain  the  value  of  a  property,  use the  dot  (
.
)  or  square  bracket  (
[]
) operators
described in §4.4. The left-hand side should be an expression whose value is an object.
If  using  the  dot operator,  the right-hand must be  a  simple identifier  that names the
property. If using square brackets, the value within the brackets must be an expression
that evaluates to a string that contains the desired property name:
var author = book.author;      // Get the "author" property of the book.
var name = author.surname      // Get the "surname" property of the author.
var title = book["main title"] // Get the "main title" property of the book.
To create or  set  a property,  use a dot or square brackets as you  would  to  query the
property, but put them on the left-hand side of an assignment expression:
book.edition = 6;                   // Create an "edition" property of book.
book["main title"] = "ECMAScript";  // Set the "main title" property.
In ECMAScript 3, the identifier that follows the dot operator cannot be a reserved word:
you cannot write 
o.for
or 
o.class
, for example, because 
for
is a language keyword and
class
is reserved for future use. If an object has properties whose name is a reserved
word,  you  must  use  square  bracket  notation  to  access  them: 
o["for"]
and
o["class"]
.  ECMAScript  5  relaxes  this  restriction  (as  do  some  implementations  of
ECMAScript 3) and allows reserved words to follow the dot.
When using square bracket notation, we’ve said that the expression inside the square
brackets must evaluate to a string. A more precise statement is that the expression must
evaluate to a string or a value that can be converted to a string. In Chapter 7, for ex-
ample, we’ll see that it is common to use numbers inside the square brackets.
6.2.1  Objects As Associative Arrays
As explained above, the following two JavaScript expressions have the same value:
object.property
object["property"]
The first syntax, using the dot and an identifier, is like the syntax used to access a static
field of a struct or object in C or Java. The second syntax, using square brackets and a
string, looks like array access, but to an array indexed by strings rather than by numbers.
This  kind  of  array is  known as  an  associative  array (or hash or map  or dictionary).
JavaScript objects are associative arrays, and this section explains why that is important.
In C, C++, Java, and similar strongly typed languages, an object can have only a fixed
number of properties, and the names of these properties must be defined in advance.
Since JavaScript is a loosely typed language, this rule does not apply:  a program can
create any number of properties in any object. When you use the 
.
operator to access
a property of an object, however, the name of the property is expressed as an identifier.
Identifiers must be typed literally into your JavaScript program; they are not a datatype,
so they cannot be manipulated by the program.
120 | Chapter 6: Objects
On the other hand, when you access a property of an object with the 
[]
array notation,
the name of the property is expressed as a string. Strings are JavaScript datatypes, so
they can be manipulated and created while a program is running. So, for example, you
can write the following code in JavaScript:
var addr = "";
for(i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
addr += customer["address" + i] + '\n';
This  code  reads  and  concatenates  the 
address0
address1
address2
 and 
address3
properties of the 
customer
object.
This brief example demonstrates the flexibility of using array notation to access prop-
erties of an object with string expressions. The code above could be rewritten using the
dot notation, but there are cases in which only the array notation will do. Suppose, for
example, that you are writing a program that uses network resources to compute the
current value of the user’s stock market investments. The program allows the user to
type in the name of each stock she owns as well as the number of shares of each stock.
You might use an object named 
portfolio
to hold this information. The object has one
property for each stock.  The name of the property is the name of the stock, and the
property value is the number of shares of that stock. So, for example, if a user holds
50 shares of stock in IBM, the 
portfolio.ibm
property has the value 
50
.
Part of this program might be a function for adding a new stock to the portfolio:
function addstock(portfolio, stockname, shares) {
portfolio[stockname] = shares;
}
Since the user enters stock names at runtime, there is no way that you can know the
property names ahead of time. Since you  can’t  know the property names  when  you
write the program, there is no way you can use the 
.
operator to access the properties
of the 
portfolio
object. You can use the 
[]
operator, however, because it uses a string
value (which is dynamic and can change at runtime) rather than an identifier (which is
static and must be hardcoded in the program) to name the property.
Chapter 5 introduced the 
for/in
loop (and we’ll see it again shortly in §6.5). The power
of this JavaScript statement becomes clear when you consider its use with associative
arrays. Here’s how you’d use it when computing the total value of a portfolio:
function getvalue(portfolio) {
var total = 0.0;
for(stock in portfolio) {           // For each stock in the portfolio:
var shares = portfolio[stock];  //   get the number of shares
var price = getquote(stock);    //   look up share price
total += shares * price;        //   add stock value to total value
}
return total;                       // Return total value.
}
6.2  Querying and Setting Properties | 121
Core JavaScript
6.2.2  Inheritance
JavaScript objects have a set of “own properties,” and they also inherit a set of properties
from their prototype object. To understand this, we must consider property access in
more  detail.  The  examples  in  this  section  use  the 
inherit()
function  from Exam-
ple 6-1 in order to create objects with specified prototypes.
Suppose you query the property 
x
in the object 
o
. If 
o
does not have an own property
with that name, the prototype object of 
o
is queried for the property 
x
. If the prototype
object does not have an own property by that name, but has a prototype itself, the query
is performed on the prototype of the prototype. This continues until the property 
x
is
found or until an object with a 
null
prototype is searched. As you can see, the proto-
type  attribute  of  an  object  creates  a  chain  or  linked  list  from  which  properties  are
inherited.
var o = {}            // o inherits object methods from Object.prototype
o.x = 1;              // and has an own property x.
var p = inherit(o);   // p inherits properties from o and Object.prototype
p.y = 2;              // and has an own property y.
var q = inherit(p);   // q inherits properties from p, o, and Object.prototype
q.z = 3;              // and has an own property z.
var s = q.toString(); // toString is inherited from Object.prototype    
q.x + q.y             // => 3: x and y are inherited from o and p
Now  suppose you assign to  the  property 
x
of the  object 
o
.  If 
o
already  has  an own
(noninherited) property named 
x
, then the assignment simply changes the value of this
existing property. Otherwise, the assignment creates a new property named 
x
on the
object 
o
. If 
o
previously inherited the property 
x
, that inherited property is now hidden
by the newly created own property with the same name.
Property assignment examines the prototype chain to determine whether the assign-
ment  is  allowed.  If 
o
inherits  a  read-only  property  named 
x
,  for  example,  then  the
assignment is not allowed. (Details about when a property may be set are in §6.2.3.) If
the assignment is allowed, however, it always creates or sets a property in the original
object and never modifies the prototype chain. The fact that inheritance occurs when
querying properties but not when setting them is a key feature of JavaScript because it
allows us to selectively override inherited properties:
var unitcircle = { r:1 };     // An object to inherit from
var c = inherit(unitcircle);  // c inherits the property r
c.x = 1; c.y = 1;             // c defines two properties of its own
c.r = 2;                      // c overrides its inherited property
unitcircle.r;                 // => 1: the prototype object is not affected
There is one exception to the rule that a property assignment either fails or creates or
sets a property in the original object. If 
o
inherits the property 
x
, and that property is
an accessor property with a setter method (see §6.6), then that setter method is called
rather than creating a new property 
x
in 
o
. Note, however,  that the setter method is
called on the object 
o
, not on the prototype object that defines the property, so if the
122 | Chapter 6: Objects
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested