open pdf and draw c# : Add url pdf Library application component .net html web page mvc %5BO%60Reilly%5D%20-%20JavaScript.%20The%20Definitive%20Guide,%206th%20ed.%20-%20%5BFlanagan%5D23-part1552

constructor using an unnamed function definition expression, the 
getName()
method
will return an empty string:
// This constructor has no name
var Complex = function(x,y) { this.r = x; this.i = y; } 
// This constructor does have a name
var Range = function Range(f,t) { this.from = f; this.to = t; }
9.5.4  Duck-Typing
None of the techniques described above for determining the class of an object are
problem-free, at least in client-side JavaScript. An alternative is to sidestep the issue:
instead of asking “what is the class of this object?” we ask instead, “what can this object
do?” This approach to programming is common in languages like Python and Ruby
and is called duck-typing after this expression (often attributed to poet James Whitcomb
Riley):
When I see a bird that walks like a duck and swims like a duck and quacks like a duck,
I call that bird a duck.
For JavaScript programmers, this aphorism can be understood to mean “if an object
can walk and swim and quack like a Duck, then we can treat it as a Duck, even if it
does not inherit from the prototype object of the Duck class.”
The Range class of Example 9-2 serves as an example. This class was designed with
numeric ranges in mind. Notice, however, that the 
Range()
constructor does not check
its arguments to ensure that they are numbers. It does use the 
>
operator on them,
however, so it assumes that they are comparable. Similarly, the 
includes()
method uses
the 
<=
operator but makes no other assumptions about the endpoints of the range.
Because the class does not enforce a particular type, its 
includes()
method works for
any kind of endpoint that can be compared with the relational operators:
var lowercase = new Range("a", "z");
var thisYear = new Range(new Date(2009, 0, 1), new Date(2010, 0, 1));
The 
foreach()
method of our Range class doesn’t explicitly test the type of the range
endpoints either, but its use of 
Math.ceil()
and the 
++
operator means that it only works
with numeric endpoints.
As another example, recall the discussion of array-like objects from §7.11. In many
circumstances, we don’t need to know whether an object is a true instance of the Array
class: it is enough to know that it has a nonnegative integer 
length
property. The ex-
istence of an integer-valued 
length
is how arrays walk, we might say, and any object
that can walk in this way can (in many circumstances) be treated as an array.
Keep in mind, however, that the 
length
property of true arrays has special behavior:
when new elements are added, the length is automatically updated, and when the length
is set to a smaller value, the array is automatically truncated. We might say that this is
how arrays swim and quack. If you are writing code that requires swimming and
quacking, you can’t use an object that only walks like an array.
9.5  Classes and Types | 213
Core JavaScript
Add url pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlinks to pdf; pdf link to attached file
Add url pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf hyperlink; pdf hyperlinks
The examples of duck-typing presented above involve the response of objects to the 
<
operator and the special behavior of the 
length
property. More typically, however,
when we talk about duck-typing, we’re talking about testing whether an object imple-
ments one or more methods. A strongly-typed 
triathlon()
function might require its
argument to be an TriAthlete object. A duck-typed alternative could be designed to
accept any object that has 
walk()
swim()
, and 
bike()
methods. Less frivolously, we
might redesign our Range class so that instead of using the 
<
and 
++
operators, it uses
the 
compareTo()
and 
succ()
(successor) methods of its endpoint objects.
One approach to duck-typing is laissez-faire: we simply assume that our input objects
implement the necessary methods and perform no checking at all. If the assumption is
invalid, an error will occur when our code attempts to invoke a nonexistent method.
Another approach does check the input objects. Rather than check their class, however,
it checks that they implement methods with the appropriate names. This allows us to
reject bad input earlier and can result in more informative error messages.
Example 9-5 defines a 
quacks()
function (“implements” would be a better name, but
implements
is a reserved word) that can be useful when duck-typing. 
quacks()
tests
whether an object (the first argument) implements the methods specified by the re-
maining arguments. For each remaining argument, if the argument is a string, it checks
for a method by that name. If the argument is an object, it checks whether the first
object implements methods with the same names as the methods of that object. If the
argument is a function, it is assumed to be a constructor, and the function checks
whether the first object implements methods with the same names as the prototype
object.
Example 9-5. A function for duck-type checking
// Return true if o implements the methods specified by the remaining args.
function quacks(o /*, ... */) {
for(var i = 1; i < arguments.length; i++) {  // for each argument after o
var arg = arguments[i];
switch(typeof arg) { // If arg is a:
case 'string':       // string: check for a method with that name
if (typeof o[arg] !== "function") return false;
continue;
case 'function':     // function: use the prototype object instead
// If the argument is a function, we use its prototype object
arg = arg.prototype;
// fall through to the next case
case 'object':       // object: check for matching methods
for(var m in arg) { // For each property of the object
if (typeof arg[m] !== "function") continue; // skip non-methods
if (typeof o[m] !== "function") return false;
}
}
}
// If we're still here, then o implements everything
return true;
}
214 | Chapter 9: Classes and Modules
C#: How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) in HTML5 Viewer
License and Price. File Formats. PDF. Word. Excel. PowerPoint. Tiff. DNN (Dotnetnuke). Quick to Start. Add a Viewer Control on Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP).
add hyperlink to pdf acrobat; clickable links in pdf
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
addTab(_tabRedact); //add Tab "Sample new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.addCSS( new customStyle({ background: "url('RasterEdge_Resource_Files/images
add link to pdf file; adding an email link to a pdf
There are a couple of important things to keep in mind about this 
quacks()
function.
First, it only tests that an object has one or more function-valued properties with speci-
fied names. The existence of these properties doesn’t tell us anything about what those
functions do or how many and what kind of arguments they expect. This, however, is
the nature of duck-typing. If you define an API that uses duck-typing rather than a
stronger version of type checking, you are creating a more flexible API but also en-
trusting the user of your API with the responsibility to use the API correctly. The second
important point to note about the 
quacks()
function is that it doesn’t work with built-
in classes. For example, you can’t write 
quacks(o, Array)
to test that o has methods
with the same names as all Array methods. This is because the methods of the built-in
classes are nonenumerable and the 
for/in
loop in 
quacks()
does not see them. (Note
that this can be remedied in ECMAScript 5 with the use of 
Object.getOwnProperty
Names()
.)
9.6  Object-Oriented Techniques in JavaScript
So far in this chapter we’ve covered the architectural fundamentals of classes in Java-
Script: the importance of the prototype object, its connections to the constructor func-
tion, how the 
instanceof
operator works, and so on. In this section we switch gears
and demonstrate a number of practical (though not fundamental) techniques for pro-
gramming with JavaScript classes. We begin with two nontrivial example classes that
are interesting in their own right but also serve as starting points for the discussions
that follow.
9.6.1  Example: A Set Class
A set is a data structure that represents an unordered collection of values, with no
duplicates. The fundamental operations on sets are adding values and testing whether
a value is a member of the set, and sets are generally implemented so that these oper-
ations are fast. JavaScript’s objects are basically sets of property names, with values
associated with each name. It is trivial, therefore, to use an object as a set of strings.
Example 9-6 implements a more general Set class in JavaScript. It works by mapping
any JavaScript value to a unique string, and then using that string as a property name.
Objects and functions do not have a concise and reliably unique string representation,
so the Set class must define an identifying property on any object or function stored in
the set.
Example 9-6. Set.js: An arbitrary set of values
function Set() {          // This is the constructor
this.values = {};     // The properties of this object hold the set
this.n = 0;           // How many values are in the set
this.add.apply(this, arguments);  // All arguments are values to add
}
// Add each of the arguments to the set.
Set.prototype.add = function() {
9.6  Object-Oriented Techniques in JavaScript | 215
Core JavaScript
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
pdf links; convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks
C# Image: How to Download Image from URL in C# Project with .NET
Add this imaging library to your C#.NET project jpeg / jpg, or bmp image from a URL to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add hyperlinks to pdf online; add a link to a pdf
for(var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++) {  // For each argument
var val = arguments[i];                  // The value to add to the set
var str = Set._v2s(val);                 // Transform it to a string
if (!this.values.hasOwnProperty(str)) {  // If not already in the set
this.values[str] = val;              // Map string to value
this.n++;                            // Increase set size
}
}
return this;                                 // Support chained method calls
};
// Remove each of the arguments from the set.
Set.prototype.remove = function() {
for(var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++) {  // For each argument
var str = Set._v2s(arguments[i]);        // Map to a string
if (this.values.hasOwnProperty(str)) {   // If it is in the set
delete this.values[str];             // Delete it
this.n--;                            // Decrease set size
}
}
return this;                                 // For method chaining
};
// Return true if the set contains value; false otherwise.
Set.prototype.contains = function(value) {
return this.values.hasOwnProperty(Set._v2s(value));
};
// Return the size of the set.
Set.prototype.size = function() { return this.n; };
// Call function f on the specified context for each element of the set.
Set.prototype.foreach = function(f, context) {
for(var s in this.values)                 // For each string in the set
if (this.values.hasOwnProperty(s))    // Ignore inherited properties
f.call(context, this.values[s]);  // Call f on the value
};
// This internal function maps any JavaScript value to a unique string.
Set._v2s = function(val) {
switch(val) {
case undefined:     return 'u';          // Special primitive
case null:          return 'n';          // values get single-letter
case true:          return 't';          // codes.
case false:         return 'f';
default: switch(typeof val) {
case 'number':  return '#' + val;    // Numbers get # prefix.
case 'string':  return '"' + val;    // Strings get " prefix.
default: return '@' + objectId(val); // Objs and funcs get @
}
}
// For any object, return a string. This function will return a different
// string for different objects, and will always return the same string
// if called multiple times for the same object. To do this it creates a
// property on o. In ES5 the property would be nonenumerable and read-only.
216 | Chapter 9: Classes and Modules
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
adding a link to a pdf in preview; add hyperlink to pdf in
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
pdf email link; clickable pdf links
function objectId(o) {
var prop = "|**objectid**|";   // Private property name for storing ids
if (!o.hasOwnProperty(prop))   // If the object has no id
o[prop] = Set._v2s.next++; // Assign it the next available
return o[prop];                // Return the id
}
};
Set._v2s.next = 100;    // Start assigning object ids at this value.
9.6.2  Example: Enumerated Types
An enumerated type is a type with a finite set of values that are listed (or “enumerated”)
when the type is defined. In C and languages derived from it, enumerated types are
declared with the 
enum
keyword. 
enum
is  a  reserved (but unused)  word  in
ECMAScript 5 which leaves open the possibility that JavaScript may someday have
native enumerated types. Until then, Example 9-7 shows how you can define your own
enumerated types in JavaScript. Note that it uses the 
inherit()
function from
Example 6-1.
Example 9-7 consists of a single function 
enumeration()
. This is not a constructor
function, however: it does not define a class named “enumeration”. Instead, this is a
factory function: each invocation creates and returns a new class. Use it like this:
// Create a new Coin class with four values: Coin.Penny, Coin.Nickel, etc.
var Coin = enumeration({Penny: 1, Nickel:5, Dime:10, Quarter:25});
var c = Coin.Dime;                   // This is an instance of the new class
c instanceof Coin                    // => true: instanceof works
c.constructor == Coin                // => true: constructor property works
Coin.Quarter + 3*Coin.Nickel         // => 40: values convert to numbers
Coin.Dime == 10                      // => true: more conversion to numbers
Coin.Dime > Coin.Nickel              // => true: relational operators work
String(Coin.Dime) + ":" + Coin.Dime  // => "Dime:10": coerce to string
The point of this example is to demonstrate that JavaScript classes are much more
flexible and dynamic than the static classes of languages like C++ and Java.
Example 9-7. Enumerated types in JavaScript
// This function creates a new enumerated type.  The argument object specifies
// the names and values of each instance of the class. The return value
// is a constructor function that identifies the new class.  Note, however
// that the constructor throws an exception: you can't use it to create new
// instances of the type.  The returned constructor has properties that 
// map the name of a value to the value itself, and also a values array,
// a foreach() iterator function
function enumeration(namesToValues) {
// This is the dummy constructor function that will be the return value.
var enumeration = function() { throw "Can't Instantiate Enumerations"; };
// Enumerated values inherit from this object.
var proto = enumeration.prototype = {
constructor: enumeration,                   // Identify type
toString: function() { return this.name; }, // Return name
valueOf: function() { return this.value; }, // Return value
9.6  Object-Oriented Techniques in JavaScript | 217
Core JavaScript
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; add url pdf
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Download and Save Image from Web URL
Apart from image downloading from web URL, RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK still dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf reader link; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
toJSON: function() { return this.name; }    // For serialization
};
enumeration.values = [];  // An array of the enumerated value objects
// Now create the instances of this new type.
for(name in namesToValues) {         // For each value 
var e = inherit(proto);          // Create an object to represent it
e.name = name;                   // Give it a name
e.value = namesToValues[name];   // And a value
enumeration[name] = e;           // Make it a property of constructor
enumeration.values.push(e);      // And store in the values array
}
// A class method for iterating the instances of the class
enumeration.foreach = function(f,c) {
for(var i = 0; i < this.values.length; i++) f.call(c,this.values[i]);
};
// Return the constructor that identifies the new type
return enumeration;
}
The “hello world” of enumerated types is to use an enumerated type to represent the
suits in a deck of cards. Example 9-8 uses the 
enumeration()
function in this way and
also defines classes to represents cards and decks of cards.
1
Example 9-8. Representing cards with enumerated types
// Define a class to represent a playing card
function Card(suit, rank) {
this.suit = suit;         // Each card has a suit
this.rank = rank;         // and a rank
}
// These enumerated types define the suit and rank values
Card.Suit = enumeration({Clubs: 1, Diamonds: 2, Hearts:3, Spades:4});
Card.Rank = enumeration({Two: 2, Three: 3, Four: 4, Five: 5, Six: 6,
Seven: 7, Eight: 8, Nine: 9, Ten: 10,
Jack: 11, Queen: 12, King: 13, Ace: 14});
// Define a textual representation for a card
Card.prototype.toString = function() {
return this.rank.toString() + " of " + this.suit.toString();
};
// Compare the value of two cards as you would in poker
Card.prototype.compareTo = function(that) {
if (this.rank < that.rank) return -1;
if (this.rank > that.rank) return 1;
return 0;
};
// A function for ordering cards as you would in poker
1.This example is based on a Java example by Joshua Bloch, available at http://jcp.org/aboutJava/
communityprocess/jsr/tiger/enum.html.
218 | Chapter 9: Classes and Modules
Card.orderByRank = function(a,b) { return a.compareTo(b); };
// A function for ordering cards as you would in bridge 
Card.orderBySuit = function(a,b) {
if (a.suit < b.suit) return -1;
if (a.suit > b.suit) return 1;
if (a.rank < b.rank) return -1;
if (a.rank > b.rank) return  1;
return 0;
};
// Define a class to represent a standard deck of cards
function Deck() {
var cards = this.cards = [];     // A deck is just an array of cards
Card.Suit.foreach(function(s) {  // Initialize the array
Card.Rank.foreach(function(r) {
cards.push(new Card(s,r));
});
});
}
// Shuffle method: shuffles cards in place and returns the deck
Deck.prototype.shuffle = function() { 
// For each element in the array, swap with a randomly chosen lower element
var deck = this.cards, len = deck.length;
for(var i = len-1; i > 0; i--) {
var r = Math.floor(Math.random()*(i+1)), temp;     // Random number
temp = deck[i], deck[i] = deck[r], deck[r] = temp; // Swap
}
return this;
};
// Deal method: returns an array of cards
Deck.prototype.deal = function(n) {  
if (this.cards.length < n) throw "Out of cards";
return this.cards.splice(this.cards.length-n, n);
};
// Create a new deck of cards, shuffle it, and deal a bridge hand
var deck = (new Deck()).shuffle();
var hand = deck.deal(13).sort(Card.orderBySuit);
9.6.3  Standard Conversion Methods
§3.8.3 and §6.10 described important methods used for type conversion of objects,
some of which are invoked automatically by the JavaScript interpreter when conversion
is necessary. You do not need to implement these methods for every class you write,
but they are important methods, and if you do not implement them for your classes, it
should be a conscious choice not to implement them rather than mere oversight.
The first, and most important, method is 
toString()
. The purpose of this method is to
return a string representation of an object. JavaScript automatically invokes this meth-
od if you use an object where a string is expected—as a property name, for example,
9.6  Object-Oriented Techniques in JavaScript | 219
Core JavaScript
or with the 
+
operator to perform string concatenation. If you don’t implement this
method, your class will inherit the default implementation from 
Object.prototype
and
will convert to the useless string “[object Object]”. A 
toString()
method might return
a human-readable string suitable for display to end users of your program. Even if this
is not necessary, however, it is often useful to define 
toString()
for ease of debugging.
The Range and Complex classes in Examples 9-2 and 9-3 have 
toString()
methods, as
do the enumerated types of Example 9-7. We’ll define a 
toString()
method for the Set
class of Example 9-6 below.
The 
toLocaleString()
is closely related to 
toString()
: it should convert an object to a
string in a locale-sensitive way. By default, objects inherit a 
toLocaleString()
method
that simply calls their 
toString()
method. Some built-in types have useful 
toLocale
String()
methods that actually return locale-dependent strings. If you find yourself
writing a 
toString()
method that converts other objects to strings, you should also
define a 
toLocaleString()
method that performs those conversions by invoking the
toLocaleString()
method on the objects. We’ll do this for the Set class below.
The third method is 
valueOf()
. Its job is to convert an object to a primitive value. The
valueOf()
method is invoked automatically when an object is used in a numeric context,
with arithmetic operators (other than 
+
) and with the relational operators, for example.
Most objects do not have a reasonable primitive representation and do not define this
method. The enumerated types in Example 9-7 demonstrate a case in which the
valueOf()
method is important, however.
The fourth method is 
toJSON()
, which is invoked automatically by 
JSON.stringify()
.
The JSON format is intended for serialization of data structures and can handle Java-
Script primitive values, arrays, and plain objects. It does not know about classes, and
when serializing an object, it ignores the object’s prototype and constructor. If you call
JSON.stringify()
on a Range or Complex object, for example, it returns a string like
{"from":1, "to":3}
or 
{"r":1, "i":-1}
. If you pass these strings to 
JSON.parse()
, you’ll
obtain a plain object with properties appropriate for Range and Complex objects, but
which do not inherit the Range and Complex methods.
This kind of serialization is appropriate for classes like Range and Complex, but for
other classes you may want to write a 
toJSON()
method to define some other serializa-
tion format. If an object has a 
toJSON()
method, 
JSON.stringify()
does not serialize
the object but instead calls 
toJSON()
and serializes the value (either primitive or object)
that it returns. Date objects, for example, have a 
toJSON()
method that returns a string
representation of the date. The enumerated types of Example 9-7 do the same: their
toJSON()
method is the same as their 
toString()
method. The closest JSON analog to
a set is an array, so we’ll define a 
toJSON()
method below that converts a Set object to
an array of values.
The Set class of Example 9-6 does not define any of these methods. A set has no prim-
itive representation, so it doesn’t make sense to define a 
valueOf()
method, but the
class should probably have 
toString()
toLocaleString()
, and 
toJSON()
methods. We
220 | Chapter 9: Classes and Modules
can do that with code like the following. Note the use of the 
extend()
function (Ex-
ample 6-2) to add methods to 
Set.prototype
:
// Add these methods to the Set prototype object.
extend(Set.prototype, {
// Convert a set to a string
toString: function() {
var s = "{", i = 0;
this.foreach(function(v) { s += ((i++ > 0)?", ":"") + v; });
return s + "}";
},
// Like toString, but call toLocaleString on all values
toLocaleString : function() {
var s = "{", i = 0;
this.foreach(function(v) {
if (i++ > 0) s += ", ";
if (v == null) s += v; // null & undefined
else s += v.toLocaleString(); // all others
});
return s + "}";
},
// Convert a set to an array of values
toArray: function() {
var a = [];
this.foreach(function(v) { a.push(v); });
return a;
}
});
// Treat sets like arrays for the purposes of JSON stringification.
Set.prototype.toJSON = Set.prototype.toArray;
9.6.4  Comparison Methods
JavaScript equality operators compare objects by reference, not by value. That is, given
two object references, they look to see if both references are to the same object. They
do not check to see if two different objects have the same property names and values.
It is often useful to be able to compare two distinct objects for equality or even for
relative order (as the 
<
and 
>
operators do). If you define a class and want to be able to
compare instances of that class, you should define appropriate methods to perform
those comparisons.
The Java programming language uses methods for object comparison, and adopting
the Java conventions is a common and useful thing to do in JavaScript. To enable
instances of your class to be tested for equality, define an instance method named
equals()
. It should take a single argument and return 
true
if that argument is equal to
the object it is invoked on. Of course it is up to you to decide what “equal” means in
the context of your own class. For simple classes you can often simply compare the
constructor
properties to ensure that the two objects are of the same type and then
compare the instance properties of the two objects to ensure that they have the same
values. The Complex class in Example 9-3 has an 
equals()
method of this sort, and we
can easily write a similar one for the Range class:
9.6  Object-Oriented Techniques in JavaScript | 221
Core JavaScript
Download from Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
// The Range class overwrote its constructor property. So add it now.
Range.prototype.constructor = Range;
// A Range is not equal to any nonrange.  
// Two ranges are equal if and only if their endpoints are equal.
Range.prototype.equals = function(that) {
if (that == null) return false;               // Reject null and undefined
if (that.constructor !== Range) return false; // Reject non-ranges
// Now return true if and only if the two endpoints are equal.
return this.from == that.from && this.to == that.to;
}
Defining an 
equals()
method for our Set class is somewhat trickier. We can’t just com-
pare the 
values
property of two sets but must perform a deeper comparison:
Set.prototype.equals = function(that) {
// Shortcut for trivial case
if (this === that) return true;  
// If the that object is not a set, it is not equal to this one.
// We use instanceof to allow any subclass of Set.
// We could relax this test if we wanted true duck-typing.
// Or we could strengthen it to check this.constructor == that.constructor
// Note that instanceof properly rejects null and undefined values
if (!(that instanceof Set)) return false;
// If two sets don't have the same size, they're not equal
if (this.size() != that.size()) return false;
// Now check whether every element in this is also in that.
// Use an exception to break out of the foreach if the sets are not equal.
try {
this.foreach(function(v) { if (!that.contains(v)) throw false; });
return true;                    // All elements matched: sets are equal.
} catch (x) {
if (x === false) return false;  // An element in this is not in that.
throw x;                        // Some other exception: rethrow it.
}
};
It is sometimes useful to compare objects according to some ordering. That is, for some
classes, it is possible to say that one instance is “less than” or “greater than” another
instance. You might order Range object based on the value of their lower bound, for
example. Enumerated types could be ordered alphabetically by name, or numerically
by the associated value (assuming the associated value is a number). Set objects, on the
other hand, do not really have a natural ordering.
If you try to use objects with JavaScript’s relation operators, such as 
<
and 
<=
, JavaScript
first calls the 
valueOf()
method of the objects and, if this method returns a primitive
value, compares those values. The enumerated types returned by the 
enumeration()
method of Example 9-7 have a 
valueOf()
method and can be meaningfully compared
using the relational operators. Most classes do not have a 
valueOf()
method, however.
To compare objects of these types according to an explicitly defined ordering of your
222 | Chapter 9: Classes and Modules
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested