open pdf and draw c# : Add a link to a pdf Library software component .net winforms azure mvc %5BO%60Reilly%5D%20-%20JavaScript.%20The%20Definitive%20Guide,%206th%20ed.%20-%20%5BFlanagan%5D24-part1553

own choosing, you can (again, following Java convention) define a method named
compareTo()
.
The 
compareTo()
method should accept a single argument and compare it to the object
on which the method is invoked. If the 
this
object is less than the argument,
compareTo()
should return a value less than zero. If the 
this
object is greater than the
argument object, the method should return a value greater than zero. And if the two
objects are equal, the method should return zero. These conventions about the return
value are important, and they allow you to substitute the following expressions for
relational and equality operators:
Replace this With this
a < b
a.compareTo(b) < 0
a <= b
a.compareTo(b) <= 0
a > b
a.compareTo(b) > 0
a >= b
a.compareTo(b) >= 0
a == b
a.compareTo(b) == 0
a != b
a.compareTo(b) != 0
The Card class of Example 9-8 defines a 
compareTo()
method of this kind, and we can
write a similar method for the Range class to order ranges by their lower bound:
Range.prototype.compareTo = function(that) {
return this.from - that.from;
};
Notice that the subtraction performed by this method correctly returns a value less than
zero, equal to zero, or greater than zero, according to the relative order of the two
Ranges. Because the 
Card.Rank
enumeration in Example 9-8 has a 
valueOf()
method,
we could have used this same idiomatic trick in the 
compareTo()
method of the Card
class.
The 
equals()
methods above perform type checking on their argument and return
false
to indicate inequality if the argument is of the wrong type. The 
compareTo()
method does not have any return value that indicates “those two values are not com-
parable,” so a 
compareTo()
method that does type checking should typically throw an
error when passed an argument of the wrong type.
Notice that the 
compareTo()
method we defined for the Range class above returns 0
when two ranges have the same lower bound. This means that as far as 
compareTo()
is
concerned, any two ranges that start at the same spot are equal. This definition of
equality is inconsistent with the definition used by the 
equals()
method, which requires
both endpoints to match. Inconsistent notions of equality can be a pernicious source
of bugs, and it is best to make your 
equals()
and 
compareTo()
methods consistent. Here
is a revised 
compareTo()
method for the Range class. It is consistent with 
equals()
and
also throws an error if called with an incomparable value:
9.6  Object-Oriented Techniques in JavaScript | 223
Core JavaScript
Add a link to a pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
change link in pdf file; adding hyperlinks to pdf
Add a link to a pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
change link in pdf; active links in pdf
// Order ranges by lower bound, or upper bound if the lower bounds are equal.
// Throws an error if passed a non-Range value.
// Returns 0 if and only if this.equals(that).
Range.prototype.compareTo = function(that) {
if (!(that instanceof Range))
throw new Error("Can't compare a Range with " + that);
var diff = this.from - that.from;         // Compare lower bounds
if (diff == 0) diff = this.to - that.to;  // If equal, compare upper bounds
return diff;
};
One reason to define a 
compareTo()
method for a class is so that arrays of instances of
that class can be sorted. The 
Array.sort()
method accepts as an optional argument a
comparison function that uses the same return-value conventions as the 
compareTo()
method. Given the 
compareTo()
method shown above, it is easy to sort an array of Range
objects with code like this:
ranges.sort(function(a,b) { return a.compareTo(b); });
Sorting is important enough that you should consider defining this kind of two-
argument comparison function as a class method for any class for which you define a
compareTo()
instance method. One can easily be defined in terms of the other. For
example:
Range.byLowerBound = function(a,b) { return a.compareTo(b); };
With a method like this defined, sorting becomes simpler:
ranges.sort(Range.byLowerBound);
Some classes can be ordered in more than one way. The Card class, for example, defines
one class method that orders cards by suit and another that orders them by rank.
9.6.5  Borrowing Methods
There is nothing special about methods in JavaScript: they are simply functions as-
signed to object properties and invoked “through” or “on” an object. A single function
can be assigned to two properties, and it then serves as two methods. We did this for
our Set class, for example, when we copied the 
toArray()
method and made it do dual-
duty as a 
toJSON()
method as well.
A single function can even be used as a method of more than one class. Most of the
built-in methods of the Array class, for example, are defined generically, and if you
define a class whose instances are array-like objects, you can copy functions from
Array.prototype
to the prototype object of your class. If you view JavaScript through
the lens of classical object-oriented languages, the use of methods of one class as meth-
ods of another class can be thought of as a form of multiple inheritance. JavaScript is
not a classical object-oriented language, however, and I prefer to describe this kind of
method reuse using the informal term borrowing.
It is not only Array methods that can be borrowed: we can write our own generic
methods. Example 9-9 defines generic 
toString()
and 
equals()
methods that are suit-
224 | Chapter 9: Classes and Modules
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C#
add hyperlinks to pdf online; add link to pdf file
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
clickable links in pdf; pdf link open in new window
able for use by simple classes like our Range, Complex, and Card classes. If the Range
class did not have an 
equals()
method, we could borrow the generic 
equals()
like this:
Range.prototype.equals = generic.equals;
Note that the 
generic.equals()
method does only a shallow comparison, and it is not
suitable for use with classes whose instance properties refer to objects with their own
equals()
methods. Also notice that this method includes special case code to handle
the property added to objects when they are inserted into a Set (Example 9-6).
Example 9-9. Generic methods for borrowing
var generic = {
// Returns a string that includes the name of the constructor function
// if available and the names and values of all noninherited, nonfunction
// properties.
toString: function() {
var s = '[';
// If the object has a constructor and the constructor has a name,
// use that class name as part of the returned string.  Note that
// the name property of functions is nonstandard and not supported
// everywhere.
if (this.constructor && this.constructor.name)
s += this.constructor.name + ": ";
// Now enumerate all noninherited, nonfunction properties
var n = 0;
for(var name in this) {
if (!this.hasOwnProperty(name)) continue;   // skip inherited props
var value = this[name];
if (typeof value === "function") continue;  // skip methods
if (n++) s += ", ";
s += name + '=' + value;
}
return s + ']';
},
// Tests for equality by comparing the constructors and instance properties
// of this and that.  Only works for classes whose instance properties are
// primitive values that can be compared with ===.
// As a special case, ignore the special property added by the Set class.
equals: function(that) {
if (that == null) return false;
if (this.constructor !== that.constructor) return false;
for(var name in this) {
if (name === "|**objectid**|") continue;     // skip special prop.
if (!this.hasOwnProperty(name)) continue;    // skip inherited 
if (this[name] !== that[name]) return false; // compare values
}
return true;  // If all properties matched, objects are equal.
}
};
9.6  Object-Oriented Techniques in JavaScript | 225
Core JavaScript
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
add a link to a pdf; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
chrome pdf from link; add hyperlink to pdf in
9.6.6  Private State
In classical object-oriented programming, it is often a goal to encapsulate or hide the
state of an object within the object, allowing access to that state only through the
methods of the object, and now allowing the important state variables to be read or
written directly. To achieve this goal, languages like Java allow the declaration of “pri-
vate” instance fields of a class that are only accessible to the instance method of the
class and cannot be seen outside of the class.
We can approximate private instance fields using variables (or arguments) captured in
the closure of the constructor invocation that creates an instance. To do this, we define
functions inside the constructor (so they have access to the constructor’s arguments
and variables) and assign those functions to properties of the newly created object.
Example 9-10 shows how we can do this to create an encapsulated version of our Range
class. Instead of having 
from
and 
to
properties that give the endpoints of the range,
instances of this new version of the class have 
from
and 
to
methods that return the
endpoints of the range. These 
from()
and 
to()
methods are defined on the individual
Range object and are not inherited from the prototype. The other Range methods are
defined on the prototype as usual, but modified to call the 
from()
and 
to()
methods
rather than read the endpoints directly from properties.
Example 9-10. A Range class with weakly encapsulated endpoints
function Range(from, to) {
// Don't store the endpoints as properties of this object. Instead
// define accessor functions that return the endpoint values.
// These values are stored in the closure.
this.from = function() { return from; };
this.to = function() { return to; };
}
// The methods on the prototype can't see the endpoints directly: they have
// to invoke the accessor methods just like everyone else.
Range.prototype = {
constructor: Range,
includes: function(x) { return this.from() <= x && x <= this.to(); },
foreach: function(f) {
for(var x=Math.ceil(this.from()), max=this.to(); x <= max; x++) f(x);
},
toString: function() { return "(" + this.from() + "..." + this.to() + ")"; }
};
This new Range class defines methods for querying the endpoints of a range, but no
methods or properties for setting those endpoints. This gives instances of this class a
kind of immutability: if used correctly, the endpoints of a Range object will not change
after it has been created. Unless we use ECMAScript 5 features (see §9.8.3), however,
the 
from
and 
to
properties are still writable, and Range objects aren’t really immutable
at all:
var r = new Range(1,5);             // An "immutable" range
r.from = function() { return 0; };  // Mutate by replacing the method
226 | Chapter 9: Classes and Modules
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
change link in pdf; pdf hyperlinks
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
change link in pdf file; pdf hyperlink
Keep in mind that there is an overhead to this encapsulation technique. A class that
uses a closure to encapsulate its state will almost certainly be slower and larger than
the equivalent class with unencapsulated state variables.
9.6.7  Constructor Overloading and Factory Methods
Sometimes we want to allow objects to be initialized in more than one way. We might
want to create a Complex object initialized with a radius and an angle (polar coordi-
nates) instead of real and imaginary components, for example, or we might want to
create a Set whose members are the elements of an array rather than the arguments
passed to the constructor.
One way to do this is to overload the constructor and have it perform different kinds
of initialization depending on the arguments it is passed. Here is an overloaded version
of the Set constructor, for example:
function Set() {          
this.values = {};     // The properties of this object hold the set
this.n = 0;           // How many values are in the set
// If passed a single array-like object, add its elements to the set
// Otherwise, add all arguments to the set
if (arguments.length == 1 && isArrayLike(arguments[0])) 
this.add.apply(this, arguments[0]);
else if (arguments.length > 0)
this.add.apply(this, arguments);
}
Defining the 
Set()
constructor this way allows us to explicitly list set members in the
constructor call or to pass an array of members to the constructor. The constructor has
an unfortunate ambiguity, however: we cannot use it to create a set that has an array
as its sole member. (To do that, we’d have to create an empty set and then call the
add()
method explicitly.)
In the case of complex numbers initialized to polar coordinates, constructor overload-
ing really isn’t viable. Both representations of complex numbers involve two floating-
point numbers and, unless we add a third argument to the constructor, there is no way
for the constructor to examine its arguments and determine which representation is
desired. Instead, we can write a factory method—a class method that returns an in-
stance of the class. Here is a factory method for returning a Complex object initialized
using polar coordinates:
Complex.polar = function(r, theta) {
return new Complex(r*Math.cos(theta), r*Math.sin(theta));
};
And here is a factory method for initializing a Set from an array:
Set.fromArray = function(a) {
s = new Set();      // Create a new empty set
s.add.apply(s, a);  // Pass elements of array a to the add method
9.6  Object-Oriented Techniques in JavaScript | 227
Core JavaScript
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
adding a link to a pdf; add page number to pdf hyperlink
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
add url to pdf; add url link to pdf
return s;           // Return the new set
};
The appeal of factory methods here is that you can give them whatever name you want,
and methods with different names can perform different kinds of initializations. Since
constructors serve as the public identity of a class, however, there is usually only a single
constructor per class. This is not a hard-and-fast rule, however. In JavaScript it is pos-
sible to define multiple constructor functions that share a single prototype object, and
if you do this, objects created by any of the constructors will be of the same type. This
technique is not recommended, but here is an auxiliary constructor of this type:
// An auxiliary constructor for the Set class.
function SetFromArray(a) {
// Initialize new object by invoking Set() as a function, 
// passing the elements of a as individual arguments.
Set.apply(this, a); 
}
// Set the prototype so that SetFromArray creates instances of Set
SetFromArray.prototype = Set.prototype;
var s = new SetFromArray([1,2,3]);
s instanceof Set   // => true
In ECMAScript 5, the 
bind()
method of functions has special behavior that allows it
to create this kind of auxiliary constructor. See §8.7.4.
9.7  Subclasses
In object-oriented programming, a class B can extend or subclass another class A. We
say that A is the superclass and B is the subclass. Instances of B inherit all the instance
methods of A. The class B can define its own instance methods, some of which may
override methods of the same name defined by class A. If a method of B overrides a
method of A, the overriding method in B may sometimes want to invoke the overridden
method in A: this is called method chaining. Similarly, the subclass constructor 
B()
may
sometimes need to invoke the superclass constructor 
A()
. This is called constructor
chaining. Subclasses can themselves have subclasses, and when working with hierar-
chies of classes, it can sometimes be useful to define abstract classes. An abstract class
is one that defines one or more methods without an implementation. The implemen-
tation of these abstract methods is left to the concrete subclasses of the abstract class.
The key to creating subclasses in JavaScript is proper initialization of the prototype
object. If class B extends A, then 
B.prototype
must be an heir of 
A.prototype
. Then
instances of B will inherit from 
B.prototype
which in turn inherits from 
A.prototype
.
This section demonstrates each of the subclass-related terms defined above, and also
covers an alternative to subclassing known as composition.
Using the Set class of Example 9-6 as a starting point, this section will demonstrate how
to define subclasses, how to chain to constructors and overridden methods, how to use
composition instead of inheritance, and finally, how to separate interface from imple-
228 | Chapter 9: Classes and Modules
mentation with abstract classes. The section ends with an extended example that de-
fines a hierarchy of Set classes. Note that the early examples in this section are intended
to demonstrate basic subclassing techniques. Some of these examples have important
flaws that will be addressed later in the section.
9.7.1  Defining a Subclass
JavaScript objects inherit properties (usually methods) from the prototype object of
their class. If an object O is an instance of a class B and B is a subclass of A, then O
must also inherit properties from A. We arrange this by ensuring that the prototype
object of B inherits from the prototype object of A. Using our 
inherit()
function
(Example 6-1), we write:
B.prototype = inherit(A.prototype); // Subclass inherits from superclass
B.prototype.constructor = B;        // Override the inherited constructor prop.
These two lines of code are the key to creating subclasses in JavaScript. Without them,
the prototype object will be an ordinary object—an object that inherits from
Object.prototype
—and this means that your class will be a subclass of Object like all
classes are. If we add these two lines to the 
defineClass()
function (from §9.3), we can
transform  it  into  the 
defineSubclass()
function  and  the 
Function.proto
type.extend()
method shown in Example 9-11.
Example 9-11. Subclass definition utilities
// A simple function for creating simple subclasses
function defineSubclass(superclass,  // Constructor of the superclass
constructor, // The constructor for the new subclass
methods,     // Instance methods: copied to prototype
statics)     // Class properties: copied to constructor
{
// Set up the prototype object of the subclass
constructor.prototype = inherit(superclass.prototype);
constructor.prototype.constructor = constructor;
// Copy the methods and statics as we would for a regular class
if (methods) extend(constructor.prototype, methods);
if (statics) extend(constructor, statics);
// Return the class
return constructor;
}
// We can also do this as a method of the superclass constructor
Function.prototype.extend = function(constructor, methods, statics) {
return defineSubclass(this, constructor, methods, statics);
};
Example 9-12 demonstrates how to write a subclass “manually” without using the
defineSubclass()
function. It defines a SingletonSet subclass of Set. A SingletonSet is
a specialized set that is read-only and has a single constant member.
9.7  Subclasses | 229
Core JavaScript
Example 9-12. SingletonSet: a simple set subclass
// The constructor function 
function SingletonSet(member) {
this.member = member;   // Remember the single member of the set
}
// Create a prototype object that inherits from the prototype of Set.
SingletonSet.prototype = inherit(Set.prototype);
// Now add properties to the prototype.
// These properties override the properties of the same name from Set.prototype.
extend(SingletonSet.prototype, {
// Set the constructor property appropriately
constructor: SingletonSet,
// This set is read-only: add() and remove() throw errors
add: function() { throw "read-only set"; },    
remove: function() { throw "read-only set"; }, 
// A SingletonSet always has size 1
size: function() { return 1; },                
// Just invoke the function once, passing the single member.
foreach: function(f, context) { f.call(context, this.member); },
// The contains() method is simple: true only for one value
contains: function(x) { return x === this.member; }
});
Our SingletonSet class has a very simple implementation that consists of five simple
method definitions. It implements these five core Set methods, but inherits methods
such as 
toString()
toArray()
and 
equals()
from its superclass. This inheritance of
methods is the reason for defining subclasses. The 
equals()
method of the Set class
(defined in §9.6.4), for example, works to compare any Set instance that has working
size()
and 
foreach()
methods with any Set that has working 
size()
and 
contains()
methods. Because SingletonSet is a subclass of Set, it inherits this 
equals()
implemen-
tation automatically and doesn’t have to write its own. Of course, given the radically
simple nature of singleton sets, it might be more efficient for SingletonSet to define its
own version of 
equals()
:
SingletonSet.prototype.equals = function(that) {
return that instanceof Set && that.size()==1 && that.contains(this.member);
};
Note that SingletonSet does not statically borrow a list of methods from Set: it dynam-
ically inherits the methods of the Set class. If we add a new method to 
Set.prototype
,
it immediately becomes available to all instances of Set and of SingletonSet (assuming
SingletonSet does not already define a method by the same name).
9.7.2  Constructor and Method Chaining
The SingletonSet class in the last section defined a completely new set implementation,
and completely replaced the core methods it inherited from its superclass. Often, how-
ever, when we define a subclass, we only want to augment or modify the behavior of
our superclass methods, not replace them completely. To do this, the constructor and
230 | Chapter 9: Classes and Modules
methods of the subclass call or chain to the superclass constructor and the superclass
methods.
Example 9-13 demonstrates this. It defines a subclass of Set named NonNullSet: a set
that does not allow 
null
and 
undefined
as members. In order to restrict the membership
in this way, NonNullSet needs to test for null and undefined values in its 
add()
method.
But it doesn’t want to reimplement the 
add()
method completely, so it chains to the
superclass version of the method. Notice also that the 
NonNullSet()
constructor doesn’t
take any action of its own: it simply passes its arguments to the superclass constructor
(invoking it as a function, not as a constructor) so that the superclass constructor can
initialize the newly created object.
Example 9-13. Constructor and method chaining from subclass to superclass
/*
* NonNullSet is a subclass of Set that does not allow null and undefined
* as members of the set.
*/
function NonNullSet() {
// Just chain to our superclass.
// Invoke the superclass constructor as an ordinary function to initialize
// the object that has been created by this constructor invocation.
Set.apply(this, arguments);
}
// Make NonNullSet a subclass of Set:
NonNullSet.prototype = inherit(Set.prototype);
NonNullSet.prototype.constructor = NonNullSet;
// To exclude null and undefined, we only have to override the add() method
NonNullSet.prototype.add = function() {
// Check for null or undefined arguments
for(var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++)
if (arguments[i] == null)
throw new Error("Can't add null or undefined to a NonNullSet");
// Chain to the superclass to perform the actual insertion
return Set.prototype.add.apply(this, arguments);
};
Let’s generalize this notion of a non-null set to a “filtered set”: a set whose members
must pass through a filter function before being added. We’ll define a class factory
function (like the 
enumeration()
function from Example 9-7) that is passed a filter
function and returns a new Set subclass. In fact, we can generalize even further and
define our class factory to take two arguments: the class to subclass and the filter to
apply to its 
add()
method. We’ll call this factory method 
filteredSetSubclass()
, and
we might use it like this:
// Define a set class that holds strings only
var StringSet = filteredSetSubclass(Set,
function(x) {return typeof x==="string";});
// Define a set class that does not allow null, undefined or functions
9.7  Subclasses | 231
Core JavaScript
var MySet = filteredSetSubclass(NonNullSet,
function(x) {return typeof x !== "function";});
The code for this class factory function is in Example 9-14. Notice how this function
performs the same method and constructor chaining as NonNullSet did.
Example 9-14. A class factory and method chaining
/*
* This function returns a subclass of specified Set class and overrides 
* the add() method of that class to apply the specified filter.
*/
function filteredSetSubclass(superclass, filter) {
var constructor = function() {          // The subclass constructor
superclass.apply(this, arguments);  // Chains to the superclass
};
var proto = constructor.prototype = inherit(superclass.prototype);
proto.constructor = constructor;
proto.add = function() {
// Apply the filter to all arguments before adding any
for(var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++) {
var v = arguments[i];
if (!filter(v)) throw("value " + v + " rejected by filter");
}
// Chain to our superclass add implementation
superclass.prototype.add.apply(this, arguments);
};
return constructor;
}
One interesting point to note about Example 9-14 is that by wrapping a function around
our subclass creation code, we are able to use the 
superclass
argument in our con-
structor and method chaining code rather than hard-coding the name of the actual
superclass. This means that if we wanted to change the superclass, we would only have
to change it in one spot, rather than searching our code for every mention of it. This is
arguably a technique that is worth using, even if we’re not defining a class factory. For
example, we could rewrite our 
NonNullSet
using a wrapper function and the
Function.prototype.extend()
method (of Example 9-11) like this:
var NonNullSet = (function() {  // Define and invoke function
var superclass = Set;       // Only specify the superclass once.
return superclass.extend(
function() { superclass.apply(this, arguments); },  // the constructor
                                                  // the methods
add: function() {
// Check for null or undefined arguments
for(var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++)
if (arguments[i] == null)
throw new Error("Can't add null or undefined");
// Chain to the superclass to perform the actual insertion
return superclass.prototype.add.apply(this, arguments);
}
232 | Chapter 9: Classes and Modules
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested