open pdf and draw c# : Add a link to a pdf control application platform web page html asp.net web browser %5BO%60Reilly%5D%20-%20JavaScript.%20The%20Definitive%20Guide,%206th%20ed.%20-%20%5BFlanagan%5D26-part1555

that inherits from the superclass prototype and also define the properties of the newly
created object. The difficulty with this approach, as mentioned earlier, is that it requires
the use of awkward property descriptors.
Another interesting point about this example is that it passes 
null
to 
Object.create()
to create an object that inherits nothing. This object is used to store the members of
the set, and the fact that it has no prototype allows us to use the 
in
operator with it
instead of the 
hasOwnProperty()
method.
Example 9-22. StringSet: a set subclass using ECMAScript 5
function StringSet() {
this.set = Object.create(null);  // Create object with no proto
this.n = 0;
this.add.apply(this, arguments);
}
// Note that with Object.create we can inherit from the superclass prototype
// and define methods in a single call. Since we don't specify any of the
// writable, enumerable, and configurable properties, they all default to false.
// Readonly methods makes this class trickier to subclass.
StringSet.prototype = Object.create(AbstractWritableSet.prototype, {
constructor: { value: StringSet },
contains: { value: function(x) { return x in this.set; } },
size: { value: function(x) { return this.n; } },
foreach: { value: function(f,c) { Object.keys(this.set).forEach(f,c); } },
add: {
value: function() {
for(var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++) {
if (!(arguments[i] in this.set)) {
this.set[arguments[i]] = true;
this.n++;
}
}
return this;
},
remove: {
value: function() {
for(var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++) {
if (arguments[i] in this.set) {
delete this.set[arguments[i]];
this.n--;
}
}
return this;
}
});
9.8.6  Property Descriptors
§6.7 described the property descriptors of ECMAScript 5 but didn’t include many
examples of their use. We conclude this section on ECMAScript 5 with an extended
9.8  Classes in ECMAScript 5 | 243
Core JavaScript
Add a link to a pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf link to attached file; clickable links in pdf from word
Add a link to a pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add a link to a pdf in preview; add a link to a pdf file
example that will demonstrate many operations on ECMAScript 5 properties.
Example 9-23 will add a 
properties()
method (nonenumerable, of course) to
Object.prototype
. The return value of this method is an object that represents a list of
properties and defines useful methods for displaying the properties and attributes (use-
ful for debugging), for obtaining property descriptors (useful when you want to copy
properties along with their attributes), and for setting attributes on the properties (use-
ful alternatives to the 
hideProps()
and 
freezeProps()
functions defined earlier). This
one example demonstrates most of the property-related features of ECMAScript 5, and
also uses a modular coding technique that will be discussed in the next section.
Example 9-23. ECMAScript 5 properties utilities
/*
* Define a properties() method in Object.prototype that returns an
* object representing the named properties of the object on which it
* is invoked (or representing all own properties of the object, if
* invoked with no arguments).  The returned object defines four useful 
* methods: toString(), descriptors(), hide(), and show().
*/
(function namespace() {  // Wrap everything in a private function scope
// This is the function that becomes a method of all object
function properties() {
var names;  // An array of property names
if (arguments.length == 0)  // All own properties of this
names = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(this);
else if (arguments.length == 1 && Array.isArray(arguments[0]))
names = arguments[0];   // Or an array of names
else                        // Or the names in the argument list
names = Array.prototype.splice.call(arguments, 0);
// Return a new Properties object representing the named properties
return new Properties(this, names);
}
// Make it a new nonenumerable property of Object.prototype.
// This is the only value exported from this private function scope.
Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, "properties", {
value: properties,  
enumerable: false, writable: true, configurable: true
});
// This constructor function is invoked by the properties() function above.
// The Properties class represents a set of properties of an object.
function Properties(o, names) {
this.o = o;            // The object that the properties belong to
this.names = names;    // The names of the properties
}
// Make the properties represented by this object nonenumerable
Properties.prototype.hide = function() {
var o = this.o, hidden = { enumerable: false };
this.names.forEach(function(n) {
if (o.hasOwnProperty(n))
244 | Chapter 9: Classes and Modules
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C#
adding links to pdf in preview; c# read pdf from url
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
add links to pdf in acrobat; clickable pdf links
Object.defineProperty(o, n, hidden);
});
return this;
};
// Make these properties read-only and nonconfigurable
Properties.prototype.freeze = function() {
var o = this.o, frozen = { writable: false, configurable: false };
this.names.forEach(function(n) {
if (o.hasOwnProperty(n))
Object.defineProperty(o, n, frozen);
});
return this;
};
// Return an object that maps names to descriptors for these properties.
// Use this to copy properties along with their attributes:
//   Object.defineProperties(dest, src.properties().descriptors());
Properties.prototype.descriptors = function() {
var o = this.o, desc = {};
this.names.forEach(function(n) {
if (!o.hasOwnProperty(n)) return;
desc[n] = Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(o,n);
});
return desc;
};
// Return a nicely formatted list of properties, listing the 
// name, value and attributes. Uses the term "permanent" to mean
// nonconfigurable, "readonly" to mean nonwritable, and "hidden"
// to mean nonenumerable. Regular enumerable, writable, configurable 
// properties have no attributes listed.
Properties.prototype.toString = function() {
var o = this.o; // Used in the nested function below
var lines = this.names.map(nameToString);
return "{\n  " + lines.join(",\n  ") + "\n}";
function nameToString(n) {
var s = "", desc = Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(o, n);
if (!desc) return "nonexistent " + n + ": undefined";
if (!desc.configurable) s += "permanent ";
if ((desc.get && !desc.set) || !desc.writable) s += "readonly ";
if (!desc.enumerable) s += "hidden ";
if (desc.get || desc.set) s += "accessor " + n
else s += n + ": " + ((typeof desc.value==="function")?"function"
:desc.value);
return s;
}
};
// Finally, make the instance methods of the prototype object above 
// nonenumerable, using the methods we've defined here.
Properties.prototype.properties().hide();
}()); // Invoke the enclosing function as soon as we're done defining it.
9.8  Classes in ECMAScript 5 | 245
Core JavaScript
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
add hyperlink to pdf online; add hyperlink pdf file
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
add hyperlink to pdf in preview; convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks
9.9  Modules
An important reason to organize code into classes is to make that code more modular
and suitable for reuse in a variety of situations. Classes are not the only kind of modular
code, however. Typically, a module is a single file of JavaScript code. A module file
might contain a class definition, a set of related classes, a library of utility functions, or
just a script of code to execute. Any chunk of JavaScript code can be a module, as long
as it is written in a modular way. JavaScript does not define any language constructs
for working with modules (it does reserve the keywords 
imports
and 
exports
, however,
so future versions of the language might), which means that writing modular JavaScript
is largely a matter of following certain coding conventions.
Many JavaScript libraries and client-side programming frameworks include some kind
of module system. Both the Dojo toolkit and Google’s Closure library, for example,
define 
provide()
and 
require()
functions for declaring and loading modules. And the
CommonJS server-side JavaScript standardization effort (see http://commonjs.org) has
created a modules specification that also uses a 
require()
function. Module systems
like this often handle module loading and dependency management for you and are
beyond the scope of this discussion. If you use one of these frameworks, then you
should use and define modules following the conventions appropriate to that frame-
work. In this section we’ll discuss very simple module conventions.
The goal of modules is to allow large programs to be assembled using code from dis-
parate sources, and for all of that code to run correctly even in the presence of code
that the module authors did not anticipate. In order for this to work, the various mod-
ules must avoid altering the global execution environment, so that subsequent modules
are allowed to run in the pristine (or near pristine) environment that it expects. As a
practical matter, this means that modules should minimize the number of global sym-
bols they define—ideally, no module should define more than one. The subsections
that follow describe simple ways to accomplish this. You’ll see that writing modular
code in JavaScript is not at all tricky: we’ve seen examples of the techniques described
here throughout this book.
9.9.1  Objects As Namespaces
One way for a module to avoid the creation of global variables is to use an object as its
namespace. Instead of defining global functions and variables, it stores the functions
and values as properties of an object (which may be referenced by a global variable).
Consider the Set class of Example 9-6. It defines a single global constructor function
Set
. It defines various instance methods for the class, but it stores them as properties
of 
Set.prototype
so they are not globals. That example also defines a 
_v2s()
utility
function, but instead of making it a global function, it stores it as a property of 
Set
.
Next, consider Example 9-16. That example defined a number of abstract and concrete
set classes. Each class had only a single global symbol, but the whole module (the single
246 | Chapter 9: Classes and Modules
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add links to pdf online; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
pdf link to email; add url pdf
file of code) defined quite a few globals. From the standpoint of a clean global name-
space, it would be better if this module of set classes defined a single global:
var sets = {};
This 
sets
object is the namespace for the module, and we define each of the set classes
as a property of this object:
sets.SingletonSet = sets.AbstractEnumerableSet.extend(...);
When we want to use a class defined like this, we simply include the namespace when
we refer to the constructor:
var s = new sets.SingletonSet(1);
The author of a module cannot know what other modules their module will be used
with and must guard against name collisions by using namespaces like this. The pro-
grammer who uses the module, however, knows what modules are in use and what
names are defined. This programmer doesn’t have to keep using the namespaces rigidly,
and can import frequently used values into the global namespace. A programmer who
was going to make frequent use of the Set class from the 
sets
namespace might import
the class like this:
var Set = sets.Set;     // Import Set to the global namespace
var s = new Set(1,2,3); // Now we can use it without the sets prefix.
Sometimes module authors use more deeply nested namespaces. If the sets module was
part of a larger group of collections modules, it might use 
collections.sets
as a name-
space, and the module would begin with code like this:
var collections;      // Declare (or re-declare) the single global variable
if (!collections)     // If it doesn't already exist
collections = {}; // Create a toplevel namespace object
collections.sets = {} // And create the sets namespace within that.
// Now start defining our set classes inside collections.sets
collections.sets.AbstractSet = function() { ... }
Sometimes the top-level namespace is used to identify the person or organization that
created the modules and prevent name collisions between namespace names. The
Google Closure library, for example, defines its Set class in the namespace goog.structs.
Individuals can reverse the components of an Internet domain name to create a globally
unique namespace prefix that is unlikely to be in use by any other module authors.
Since my website is at davidflanagan.com, I could publish my sets module in the name-
space 
com.davidflanagan.collections.sets
.
With namespaces this long, importing values becomes important for any user of your
module. Rather than importing individual classes, however, a programmer might im-
port the entire module to the global namespace:
var sets = com.davidflanagan.collections.sets;
By convention, the filename of a module should match its namespace. The sets module
should be stored in a file named sets.js. If that module uses the namespace
collections.sets, then this file should be stored in a directory named collections/ (this
9.9  Modules | 247
Core JavaScript
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
adding hyperlinks to a pdf; check links in pdf
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
pdf link to specific page; add hyperlink pdf
directory might also include a file named maps.js). And a module that used the name-
space com.davidflanagan.collections.sets would be in com/davidflanagan/collections/
sets.js.
9.9.2  Function Scope As a Private Namespace
Modules have a public API that they export: these are the functions, classes, properties,
and methods that are intended to be used by other programmers. Often, however,
module implementations require additional functions or methods that are not intended
for use outside of the module. The 
Set._v2s()
function of Example 9-6 is an example—
we don’t want users of the Set class to ever call that function, so it would be better if it
was inaccessible.
We can do that by defining our module (the Set class in this case) inside a function. As
described in §8.5, variables and functions defined within another function are local to
that function and not visible outside of it. In effect, we can use the scope of a function
(sometimes called a “module function”) as a private namespace for our module.
Example 9-24 shows what this might look like for our Set class.
Example 9-24. A Set class in a module function
// Declare a global variable Set and assign it the return value of this function
// The open parenthesis and the function name below hint that the function 
// will be invoked immediately after being defined, and that it is the function
// return value, not the function itself, that is being assigned.
// Note that this is a function expression, not a statement, so the name
// "invocation" does not create a global variable.
var Set = (function invocation() {
function Set() {  // This constructor function is a local variable.
this.values = {};     // The properties of this object hold the set
this.n = 0;           // How many values are in the set
this.add.apply(this, arguments);  // All arguments are values to add
}
// Now define instance methods on Set.prototype.
// For brevity, code has been omitted here
Set.prototype.contains = function(value) {
// Note that we call v2s(), not the heavily prefixed Set._v2s()
return this.values.hasOwnProperty(v2s(value));
};
Set.prototype.size = function() { return this.n; };
Set.prototype.add = function() { /* ... */ };
Set.prototype.remove = function() { /* ... */ };
Set.prototype.foreach = function(f, context) { /* ... */ };
// These are helper functions and variables used by the methods above
// They're not part of the public API of the module, but they're hidden
// within this function scope so we don't have to define them as a 
// property of Set or prefix them with underscores.
function v2s(val) { /* ... */ }
function objectId(o) { /* ... */ }
var nextId = 1;
248 | Chapter 9: Classes and Modules
// The public API for this module is the Set() constructor function.
// We need to export that function from this private namespace so that
// it can be used on the outside.  In this case, we export the constructor
// by returning it.  It becomes the value of the assignment expression
// on the first line above.
return Set;
}()); // Invoke the function immediately after defining it.
Note that this function definition followed by immediate invocation is idiomatic in
JavaScript. Code that is to run in a private namespace is prefixed by “(function() {”
and followed by “}());”. The open parenthesis at the start ensures that this is a function
expression, not a function definition statement, so any function name that clarifies your
code can be added to the prefix. In Example 9-24 we used the name “invocation” to
emphasize that the function would be invoked immediately after being defined. The
name “namespace” could also be used to emphasize that the function was serving as a
namespace.
Once module code has been sealed up inside a function, it needs some way to export
its public API so that it can be used from outside the module function. In Exam-
ple 9-24, the module function returned the constructor, which we then assigned to a
global variable. The fact that the value is returned makes it very clear that it is being
exported outside of the function scope. Modules that have more than one item in their
API can return a namespace object. For our sets module, we might write code that looks
something like this:
// Create a single global variable to hold all collection-related modules
var collections; 
if (!collections) collections = {};
// Now define the sets module
collections.sets = (function namespace() {
// Define the various set classes here, using local variables and functions
//    ... Lots of code omitted...
// Now export our API by returning a namespace object
return {
// Exported property name : local variable name
AbstractSet: AbstractSet,
NotSet: NotSet,
AbstractEnumerableSet: AbstractEnumerableSet,
SingletonSet: SingletonSet,
AbstractWritableSet: AbstractWritableSet,
ArraySet: ArraySet
};
}());
A similar technique is to treat the module function as a constructor, invoke it with
new
, and export values by assigning them to 
this
:
var collections; 
if (!collections) collections = {};
collections.sets = (new function namespace() {
9.9  Modules | 249
Core JavaScript
//    ... Lots of code omitted...
// Now export our API to the this object
this.AbstractSet = AbstractSet;
this.NotSet = NotSet;      // And so on....
// Note no return value.
}());
As an alternative, if a global namespace object has already been defined, the module
function can simply set properties of that object directly, and not bother returning
anything at all:
var collections; 
if (!collections) collections = {};
collections.sets = {};
(function namespace() {
//    ... Lots of code omitted...
// Now export our public API to the namespace object created above
collections.sets.AbstractSet = AbstractSet;
collections.sets.NotSet = NotSet;     // And so on...
// No return statement is needed since exports were done above.
}());
Frameworks that define module loading systems may have other methods of exporting
a module’s API. There may be a 
provides()
function for modules to register their API,
or an 
exports
object into which modules must store their API. Until JavaScript has
module management features of its own, you should choose the module creation and
exporting system that works best with whatever framework or toolkit you use.
250 | Chapter 9: Classes and Modules
CHAPTER 10
Pattern Matching with
Regular Expressions
A regular expression is an object that describes a pattern of characters. The JavaScript
RegExp class represents regular expressions, and both String and RegExp define meth-
ods that use regular expressions to perform powerful pattern-matching and search-and-
replace functions on text. JavaScript’s regular expression grammar is a fairly complete
subset of the regular-expression syntax used by Perl 5, so if you are an experienced Perl
programmer, you already know how to describe patterns in JavaScript.
1
This chapter begins by defining the syntax that regular expressions use to describe
textual patterns. It then moves on to describe the String and RegExp methods that use
regular expressions.
10.1  Defining Regular Expressions
In JavaScript, regular expressions are represented by RegExp objects. RegExp objects
may be created with the 
RegExp()
constructor, of course, but they are more often created
using a special literal syntax. Just as string literals are specified as characters within
quotation marks, regular expression literals are specified as characters within a pair of
slash (
/
) characters. Thus, your JavaScript code may contain lines like this:
var pattern = /s$/;
This line creates a new RegExp object and assigns it to the variable 
pattern
. This par-
ticular RegExp object matches any string that ends with the letter “s.” This regular
expression could have equivalently been defined with the 
RegExp()
constructor like this:
var pattern = new RegExp("s$");
1.Perl regular expression features that are not supported by ECMAScript include the 
s
(single-line mode)
and 
x
(extended syntax) flags; the 
\a
\e
\l
\u
\L
\U
\E
\Q
\A
\Z
\z
, and 
\G
escape sequences; the
(?<=
positive look-behind anchor and the 
(?<!
negative look-behind anchor; and the 
(?#
comment and
the other extended 
(?
syntaxes.
251
RegExp Literals and Object Creation
Literals of primitive type, like strings and numbers, evaluate (obviously) to the same
value each time they are encountered in a program. Object literals (or initializers) such
as 
{}
and 
[]
create a new object each time they are encountered. If you write 
var a =
[]
in the body of a loop, for example, each iteration of the loop will create a new empty
array.
Regular expression literals are a special case. The ECMAScript 3 specification says that
a RegExp literal is converted to a RegExp object when the code is parsed, and each
evaluation of the code returns the same object. The ECMAScript 5 specification reverses
this and requires that each evaluation of a RegExp return a new object. IE has always
implemented the ECMAScript 5 behavior and most current browsers have now switch-
ed to it, even before they fully implement the standard.
Regular-expression pattern specifications consist of a series of characters. Most char-
acters, including all alphanumeric characters, simply describe characters to be matched
literally. Thus, the regular expression 
/java/
matches any string that contains the sub-
string “java”. Other characters in regular expressions are not matched literally but have
special significance. For example, the regular expression 
/s$/
contains two characters.
The first, “s”, matches itself literally. The second, “$”, is a special metacharacter that
matches the end of a string. Thus, this regular expression matches any string that con-
tains the letter “s” as its last character.
The following sections describe the various characters and metacharacters used in
JavaScript regular expressions.
10.1.1  Literal Characters
As noted earlier, all alphabetic characters and digits match themselves literally in reg-
ular expressions. JavaScript regular-expression syntax also supports certain nonalpha-
betic characters through escape sequences that begin with a backslash (
\
). For example,
the sequence 
\n
matches a literal newline character in a string. Table 10-1 lists these
characters.
Table 10-1. Regular-expression literal characters
Character
Matches
Alphanumeric
character
Itself
\0
The NUL character 
(\u0000)
\t
Tab 
(\u0009
)
\n
Newline (
\u000A
)
\v
Vertical tab (
\u000B
)
\f
Form feed (
\u000C
)
252 | Chapter 10: Pattern Matching with Regular Expressions
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested