open pdf and draw c# : Convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks application Library cloud html asp.net windows class %5BO%60Reilly%5D%20-%20JavaScript.%20The%20Definitive%20Guide,%206th%20ed.%20-%20%5BFlanagan%5D33-part1563

13.2.2  Scripts in External Files
The 
<script>
tag supports a 
src
attribute that specifies the URL of a file containing
JavaScript code. It is used like this:
<script src="../../scripts/util.js"></script>
A JavaScript file contains pure JavaScript, without 
<script>
tags or any other HTML.
By convention, files of JavaScript code have names that end with .js.
<script>
tag with the 
src
attribute specified behaves exactly as if the contents of the
specified JavaScript file appeared directly between the 
<script>
and 
</script>
tags.
Note that the closing 
</script>
tag is required in HTML documents even when the
src
attribute is specified, and there is no content between the 
<script>
and 
</script>
tags. In XHTML, you can use the shortcut 
<script/>
tag in this case.
When  you  use  the 
src
attribute,  any  content  between  the  opening  and  closing
<script>
tags is ignored. If desired, you can use the content of the 
<script>
tag to include
documentation or copyright information for the included code. Note, however, that
HTML5 validators will complain if any text that is not whitespace or a JavaScript com-
ment appears between 
<script src="">
and 
</script>
.
There are a number of advantages to using the 
src
attribute:
• It simplifies your HTML files by allowing you to remove large blocks of JavaScript
code from them—that is, it helps keep content and behavior separate.
• When multiple web pages share the same JavaScript code, using the 
src
attribute
allows you to maintain only a single copy of that code, rather than having to edit
each HTML file when the code changes.
• If a file of JavaScript code is shared by more than one page, it only needs to be
downloaded once, by the first page that uses it—subsequent pages can retrieve it
from the browser cache.
• Because the 
src
attribute takes an arbitrary URL as its value, a JavaScript program
or web page from one web server can employ code exported by other web servers.
Much Internet advertising relies on this fact.
• The ability to load scripts from other sites allows us to take the benefits of caching
a step further: Google is promoting the use of standard well-known URLs for the
most commonly used client-side libraries, allowing the browser to cache a single
copy for shared use by any site across the Web. Linking to JavaScript code on
Google servers can decrease the start-up time for your web pages, since the library
is likely to already exist in the user’s browser cache, but you must be willing to
trust a third-party to serve code that is critical to your site. See http://code.google
.com/apis/ajaxlibs/ for more information.
Loading scripts from servers other than the one that served the document that uses the
script has important security implications. The same-origin security policy described
in §13.6.2 prevents JavaScript in a document from one domain from interacting with
13.2  Embedding JavaScript in HTML | 313
Client-Side
JavaScript
Convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
chrome pdf from link; pdf link to email
Convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf link to attached file; adding an email link to a pdf
content from another domain. However, notice that the origin of the script itself does
not matter: only the origin of the document in which the script is embedded. Therefore,
the same-origin policy does not apply in this case: JavaScript code can interact with the
document in which it is embedded, even when the code has a different origin than the
document. When you use the 
src
attribute to include a script in your page, you are
giving the author of that script (and the webmaster of the domain from which the script
is loaded) complete control over your web page.
13.2.3  Script Type
JavaScript was the original scripting language for the Web and 
<script>
elements are,
by default, assumed to contain or to reference JavaScript code. If you want to use a
nonstandard scripting language, such as Microsoft’s VBScript (which is supported by
IE only), you must use the 
type
attribute to specify the script MIME type:
<script type="text/vbscript">
' VBScript code goes here
</script>
The default value of the 
type
attribute is “text/javascript”. You can specify this type
explicitly if you want, but it is never necessary.
Older browsers used a 
language
attribute on the 
<script>
tag instead of the 
type
at-
tribute, and you may still sometimes see web pages that include tags like this:
<script language="javascript">
// JavaScript code here...
</script>
The 
language
attribute is deprecated and should no longer be used.
When a web browser encounters a 
<script>
element with a 
type
attribute whose value
it does not recognize, it parses the element but does not attempt to display or execute
that content. This means that you can use the 
<script>
element to embed arbitrary
textual data into your document: just use the 
type
attribute to specify a non-executable
type  for  your  data.  To  retrieve  the  data,  you  can  use  the 
text
property  of  the
HTMLElement
object that represents the script element (Chapter 15 explains how to ob-
tain these elements). Note, however, that this data embedding technique only works
for inline scripts. If you specify a 
src
attribute and an unknown 
type
, the script will be
ignored and nothing will be downloaded from the URL you specified.
13.2.4  Event Handlers in HTML
JavaScript code in a script is executed once: when the HTML file that contains it is
loaded into the web browser. In order to be interactive, a JavaScript program must
define event handlers—JavaScript functions that are registered with the web browser
and then invoked by the web browser in response to events (such as user input). As
shown at the start of this chapter, JavaScript code can register an event handler by
assigning a function to a property (such as 
onclick
or 
onmouseover
) of an Element object
314 | Chapter 13: JavaScript in Web Browsers
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Why do we need to convert PDF document to HTML webpage using VB.NET programming code?
add hyperlink pdf file; pdf reader link
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Our PDF to HTML converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML
pdf email link; adding links to pdf document
that represents an HTML element in the document. (There are also other ways to reg-
ister event handlers—see Chapter 17.)
Event handler properties like 
onclick
mirror HTML attributes with the same names,
and it is also possible to define event handlers by placing JavaScript code in HTML
attributes. For example, to define an event handler that is invoked when the user toggles
a checkbox in a form, you can specify the handler code as an attribute of the HTML
element that defines the checkbox:
<input type="checkbox" name="options" value="giftwrap"
onchange="order.options.giftwrap = this.checked;">
What’s of interest here is the 
onchange
attribute. The JavaScript code that is the value
of this attribute will be executed whenever the user checks or unchecks the checkbox.
Event  handler attributes  defined in  HTML  may include any  number of JavaScript
statements, separated from each other by semicolons. These statements become the
body of a function, and that function becomes the value of the corresponding event
handler property. (The details of the conversion of HTML attribute text to a JavaScript
function are covered in §17.2.2.) Typically, however, an HTML event handler attribute
consists of a simple assignment as above or a simple invocation of a function defined
elsewhere. This keeps most of your actual JavaScript code within scripts and reduces
the need to mingle JavaScript and HTML. In fact, the use of HTML event handler
attributes is considered poor style by many web developers who prefer to keep content
and behavior separate.
13.2.5  JavaScript in URLs
Another way that JavaScript code can be included on the client side is in a URL fol-
lowing the 
javascript:
protocol specifier. This special protocol type specifies that the
body of the URL is an arbitrary string of JavaScript code to be run by the JavaScript
interpreter. It is treated as a single line of code, which means that statements must be
separated by semicolons and that 
/* */
comments must be used in place of 
//
com-
ments. The “resource” identified by a 
javascript:
URL is the return value of the exe-
cuted code, converted to a string. If the code has an 
undefined
return value, the resource
has no content.
You can use a 
javascript:
URL anywhere you’d use a regular URL: the 
href
attribute
of an 
<a>
tag, the 
action
attribute of a 
<form>
, for example, or even as an argument to
a method like 
window.open()
. A JavaScript URL in a hyperlink might look like this:
<a href="javascript:new Date().toLocaleTimeString();">
What time is it?
</a>
Some browsers (such as Firefox) execute the code in the URL and use the returned
string as the content of a new document to display. Just as when following a link to an
http:
URL, the browser erases the current document and displays the new one. The
value returned by the code above does not contain any HTML tags, but if it did, the
13.2  Embedding JavaScript in HTML | 315
Client-Side
JavaScript
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images DNN, C#.NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET
clickable links in pdf files; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in
C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Generating thumbnail for PDF document is an easy work and gives
add links to pdf file; add url link to pdf
browser would have rendered them as it would have rendered the equivalent conven-
tionally loaded HTML document. Other browsers (such as Chrome and Safari) do not
allow URLs like the one above to overwrite the containing document—they just ignore
the return value of the code. They do, however, still support URLs like this one:
<a href="javascript:alert(new Date().toLocaleTimeString());">
Check the time without overwriting the document
</a>
When this sort of URL is loaded, the browser executes the JavaScript code, but because
there is no returned value (the 
alert()
method returns 
undefined
), browsers like Firefox
do not replace the currently displayed document. (In this case, the 
javascript:
URL
serves the same purpose as an 
onclick
event handler. The link above would be better
expressed as an 
onclick
handler on a 
<button>
element—the 
<a>
element should gen-
erally be reserved for hyperlinks that load new documents.) If you want to ensure that
javascript:
URL does not overwrite the document, you can use the 
void
operator to
force an invocation or assignment expression to be 
undefined
:
<a href="javascript:void window.open('about:blank');">Open Window</a>
Without the 
void
operator in this URL, the return value of the 
Window.open()
method
call would (in some browsers) be converted to a string and displayed, and the current
document would be overwritten by a document that contains this text:
[object Window]
Like HTML event handler attributes, JavaScript URLs are a holdover from the early
days of the Web and are generally avoided in modern HTML. 
javascript:
URLs do
have a useful role to play outside of HTML documents. If you need to test a small snippet
of JavaScript code, you can type a 
javascript:
URL directly into the location bar of
your browser. Another legitimate (and powerful) use of 
javascript:
URLs is in browser
bookmarks, as described below.
13.2.5.1  Bookmarklets
In a web browser, a “bookmark” is a saved URL. If you bookmark a 
javascript:
URL,
you are saving a small script, known as a bookmarklet. A bookmarklet is a mini-program
that can be easily launched from the browser’s menus or toolbar. The code in a book-
marklet runs as if it were a script on the page and can query and set document content,
presentation, and behavior. As long as a bookmarklet does not return a value, it can
operate on whatever document is currently displayed without replacing that document
with new content.
Consider the following 
javascript:
URL in an 
<a>
tag. Clicking the link opens a simple
JavaScript expression evaluator that allows you to evaluate expressions and execute
statements in the context of the page:
<a href='javascript:
var e = "", r = ""; /* Expression to evaluate and the result */
do {
/* Display expression and result and ask for a new expression */
316 | Chapter 13: JavaScript in Web Browsers
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
Able to convert PDF documents into other formats (multipage TIFF bookmarks and metadata; Advanced document cleanup and Annotate and redact in PDF documents; Fully
add link to pdf file; pdf link
PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
advanced capabilities, such as text extraction, hyperlinks, bookmarks and write, view, render, report and convert word document without need for PDF.
add url pdf; add url to pdf
e = prompt("Expression: " + e + "\n" + r + "\n", e);
try { r = "Result: " + eval(e); } /* Try to evaluate the expression */
catch(ex) { r = ex; }             /* Or remember the error instead  */
} while(e);  /* Continue until no expression entered or Cancel clicked */
void 0;      /* This prevents the current document from being overwritten */
'>
JavaScript Evaluator
</a>
Note that even though this JavaScript URL is written across multiple lines, the HTML
parser treats it as a single line, and single-line 
//
comments will not work in it. Also,
remember that the code is all part of a single-quoted HTML attribute, so the code may
not contain any single quotes.
A link like this is useful when hardcoded into a page that you are developing but be-
comes much more useful when stored as a bookmark that you can run on any page.
Browsers  typically allow you to bookmark the destination of a hyperlink by right-
clicking on the link and selecting something like Bookmark Link or by dragging the
link to your bookmarks toolbar.
13.3  Execution of JavaScript Programs
There is no formal definition of a program in client-side JavaScript. We can say that a
JavaScript program consists of all the JavaScript code in a web page (inline scripts,
HTML event handlers, and 
javascript:
URLs) along with external JavaScript code
referenced with the 
src
attribute of a 
<script>
tag. All of these separate bits of code
share a single global Window object. That means that they all see the same Document
object, and they share the same set of global functions and variables: if a script defines
a new global variable or function, that variable or function will be visible to any Java-
Script code that runs after the script does.
If a web page includes an embedded frame (using the 
<iframe>
element), the JavaScript
code in the embedded document has a different global object than the code in the
embedding document, and it can be considered a separate JavaScript program. Re-
member, though, that there is no formal definition of what the boundaries of a Java-
Script program are. If the container document and the contained document are from
the same server, the code in one document can interact with the code in the other, and
you can treat them as two interacting parts of a single program, if you wish. §14.8.3
explains more about the global Window object and the interactions between programs
in separate windows and frames.
javascript:
URLs in bookmarklets exist outside of any document and can be thought
of as a kind of user extension or modification to other programs. When the user runs
a bookmarklet, the bookmarked JavaScript code is given access to the global object and
content of the current document and can manipulate it as desired.
JavaScript program execution occurs in two phases. In the first phase, the document
content is loaded and the code from 
<script>
elements (both inline scripts and external
13.3  Execution of JavaScript Programs | 317
Client-Side
JavaScript
scripts) is run. Scripts generally (but not always; see §13.3.1) run in the order in which
they appear in the document. The JavaScript code within any single script is run from
top to bottom, in the order that it appears, subject, of course, to JavaScript’s condi-
tionals, loops, and other control statements.
Once the document is loaded and all scripts have run, JavaScript execution enters its
second phase. This phase is asynchronous and event-driven. During this event-driven
phase, the web browser invokes event handler functions (defined by HTML event han-
dler attributes, by scripts executed in the first phase, or by previously invoked event
handlers) in response to events that occur asynchronously. Event handlers are most
commonly invoked in response to user input (mouse clicks, keystrokes, etc.) but may
also be triggered by network activity, elapsed time, or errors in JavaScript code. Events
and event handlers are described in detail in Chapter 17. We’ll also have more to say
about them in §13.3.2. Note that 
javascript:
URLs embedded in a web page can be
thought of as a type of event handler, since they have no effect until activated by a user
input event such as clicking on a link or submitting a form.
One of the first events that occurs during the event-driven phase is the load event, which
indicates that the document is fully loaded and ready to be manipulated. JavaScript
programs often use this event as a trigger or starting signal. It is common to see programs
whose scripts define functions but take no action other than defining an 
onload
event
handler function to be triggered by the load event at the beginning of the event-driven
phase of execution. It is this onload handler that then manipulates the document and
does whatever it is that the program is supposed to do. The loading phase of a JavaScript
program is relatively short, typically lasting only a second or two. Once the document
is loaded, the event-driven phase lasts for as long as the document is displayed by the
web browser. Because this phase is asynchronous and event-driven, there may be long
periods of inactivity, where no JavaScript is executed, punctuated by bursts of activity
triggered by user or network events. §13.3.4 covers the two phases of JavaScript exe-
cution in more detail.
Both core JavaScript and client-side JavaScript have a single-threaded execution model.
Scripts and event handlers are (or must appear to be) executed one at a time without
concurrency. This keeps JavaScript programming simple and is discussed in §13.3.3.
13.3.1  Synchronous, Asynchronous, and Deferred Scripts
When JavaScript was first added to web browsers, there was no API for traversing and
manipulating the structure and content of a document. The only way that JavaScript
code could affect the content of a document was to generate that content on the fly
while the document was loading. It did this using the 
document.write()
method. Ex-
ample 13-3 shows what state-of-the-art JavaScript code looked like in 1996.
Example 13-3. Generating document content at load time
<h1>Table of Factorials</h1>
<script>
function factorial(n) {                 // A function to compute factorials
318 | Chapter 13: JavaScript in Web Browsers
Download from Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
if (n <= 1) return n;
else return n*factorial(n-1);
}
document.write("<table>");                         // Begin an HTML table
document.write("<tr><th>n</th><th>n!</th></tr>");  // Output table header
for(var i = 1; i <= 10; i++) {                     // Output 10 rows
document.write("<tr><td>" + i + "</td><td>" + factorial(i) + "</td></tr>");
}
document.write("</table>");                        // End the table
document.write("Generated at " + new Date());      // Output a timestamp
</script>
When a script passes text to 
document.write()
, that text is added to the document input
stream, and the HTML parser behaves as if the script element had been replaced by
that text. The use of 
document.write()
is no longer considered good style, but it is still
possible (see §15.10.2) and this fact has an important implication. When the HTML
parser encounters a 
<script>
element, it must, by default, run the script before it can
resume parsing and rendering the document. This is not much of a problem for inline
scripts, but if the script source code is in an external file specified with a 
src
attribute,
this means that the portions of the document that follow the script will not appear in
the browser until the script has been downloaded and executed.
This synchronous or blocking script execution is the default only. The 
<script>
tag can
have 
defer
and 
async
attributes, which (in browsers that support them) cause scripts
to be executed differently. These are boolean attributes—they don’t have a value; they
just need to be present on the 
<script>
tag. HTML5 says that these attributes are only
meaningful when used in conjunction with the 
src
attribute, but some browsers may
support deferred inline scripts as well:
<script defer src="deferred.js"></script>
<script async src="async.js"></script>
Both the 
defer
and 
async
attributes are ways of telling the browser that the linked script
does not use 
document.write()
and won’t be generating document content, and that
therefore the browser can continue to parse and render the document while down-
loading the script. The 
defer
attribute causes the browser to defer execution of the
script until after the document has been loaded and parsed and is ready to be manip-
ulated. The 
async
attribute causes the browser to run the script as soon as possible but
not to block document parsing while the script is being downloaded. If a 
<script>
tag
has both attributes, a browser that supports both will honor the 
async
attribute and
ignore the 
defer
attribute.
Note that deferred scripts run in the order in which they appear in the document. Async
scripts run as they load, which means that they may execute out of order.
At the time of this writing, the 
async
and 
defer
attributes are not yet widely imple-
mented, and they should be considered optimization hints only: your web pages should
be designed to work correctly even if deferred and asynchronous scripts are executed
synchronously.
13.3  Execution of JavaScript Programs | 319
Client-Side
JavaScript
You can load and execute scripts asynchronously, even in browsers that do not support
the 
async
attribute, by dynamically creating a 
<script>
element and inserting it into the
document. The 
loadasync()
function shown in Example 13-4 does this. The techniques
it uses are explained in Chapter 15.
Example 13-4. Asynchronously loading and executing a script
// Asynchronously load and execute a script from a specified URL
function loadasync(url) { 
var head = document.getElementsByTagName("head")[0]; // Find document <head>
var s = document.createElement("script");  // Create a <script> element
s.src = url;                               // Set its src attribute 
head.appendChild(s);                       // Insert the <script> into head
}
Notice that this 
loadasync()
function loads scripts dynamically—scripts that are nei-
ther included inline within the web page nor referenced statically from the web page
are loaded into the document and become part of the running JavaScript program.
13.3.2  Event-Driven JavaScript
The ancient JavaScript program shown in Example 13-3 is a synchronous one: it starts
running when the page loads, produces some output, and then terminates. This kind
of program is very uncommon today. Instead, we write programs that register event
handler functions. These functions are then invoked asynchronously when the events
for which they were registered occur. A web application that wants to enable keyboard
shortcuts for common actions would register an event handler for key events, for ex-
ample. Even noninteractive programs use events. Suppose you wanted to write a pro-
gram that would analyze the structure of its document and automatically generate a
table of contents for the document. No event handlers for user input events are neces-
sary, but the program would still register an 
onload
event handler so that it would know
when the document had finished loading and was ready to have a table of contents
generated.
Events and event handling are the subject of Chapter 17, but this section will provide
a quick overview. Events have a name, such as “click”, “change”, “load”, “mouseover”,
“keypress”, or “readystatechange”, that indicates the general type of event that has
occurred. Events also have a target, which is the object on which they occurred. When
we speak of an event, we must specify both the event type (the name) and the target: a
click event on an HTMLButtonElement object, for example, or a readystatechange
event on an XMLHttpRequest object.
If we want our program to respond to an event, we write a function known as an “event
handler,” “event listener,” or sometimes just a “callback.” We then register this func-
tion so that it is invoked when the event occurs. As noted earlier, this can be done using
HTML attributes, but this kind of mixing of JavaScript code with HTML content is
discouraged. Instead, the simplest way to register an event handler is usually to assign
a JavaScript function to a property of the target object, with code like this:
320 | Chapter 13: JavaScript in Web Browsers
window.onload = function() { ... };
document.getElementById("button1").onclick = function() { ... };
function handleResponse() { ... }
request.onreadystatechange = handleResponse;
Notice that event handler properties have names that, by convention, begin with “on”
and are followed by the name of the event. Also notice that there are no function in-
vocations in any of the code above: we’re assigning functions themselves to these prop-
erties. The browser will perform the invocation when the events occur. Asynchronous
programming with events often involves nested functions and it is not uncommon to
end up writing code that defines functions within functions within functions.
In most browsers, for most kinds of events, event handlers are passed an object as an
argument, and the properties of this object provide details about the event. The object
passed to a click event, for example, would have a property that specified which mouse
button was clicked. (In IE, these event details are stored in the global 
event
object
instead of being passed to the handler function.) The return value of an event handler
is sometimes used to indicate whether the function has sufficiently handled the event
and to prevent the browser from performing whatever default action it would otherwise
take.
Events whose targets are elements in a document often propagate up the document
tree in a process known as “bubbling.” If the user clicks the mouse on a 
<button>
element, for example, a click event is fired on the button. If that event is not handled
(and its propagation stopped) by a function registered on the button, the event bubbles
up to whatever element the button is nested within, and any click event handler regis-
tered on that container element will be invoked.
If you need to register more than one event handler function for a single event, or if you
want to write a module of code that can safely register event handlers even if another
module has already registered a handler for the same event on the same target, you have
to use another event handler registration technique. Most objects that can be event
targets have a method named 
addEventListener()
, which allows the registration of
multiple listeners:
window.addEventListener("load", function() {...}, false);
request.addEventListener("readystatechange", function() {...}, false);
Note  that the  first  argument  to this  function  is  the  name  of the  event.  Although
addEventListener()
has been standardized for over a decade, Microsoft is only now
implementing it for IE9. In IE8 and earlier, you must use a similar method, named
attachEvent()
:
window.attachEvent("onload", function() {...});
See Chapter 17 for more on 
addEventListener()
and 
attachEvent()
.
Client-side JavaScript programs also use other kinds of asynchronous notification that
are not, technically speaking, events. If you set the 
onerror
property of the Window
object to a function, that function will be invoked when a JavaScript error (or any
13.3  Execution of JavaScript Programs | 321
Client-Side
JavaScript
uncaught exception) occurs (see §14.6). Also, the 
setTimeout()
and 
setInterval()
functions (these are methods of the Window object and therefore global functions of
client-side JavaScript) trigger the invocation of a specified function after a specified
amount of time. The functions passed to 
setTimeout()
are registered differently than
true event handlers, and they are usually called “callbacks” instead of “handlers,” but
they are asynchronous just as event handlers are. See §14.1 for more on 
setTimeout()
and 
setInterval()
.
Example 13-5 demonstrates 
setTimeout()
addEventListener()
, and 
attachEvent()
to
define an 
onLoad()
function that registers a function to be run when the document
finishes  loading. 
onLoad()
is  a  very  useful  function,  and  we’ll  use  it  in  examples
throughout the rest of this book.
Example 13-5. onLoad(): invoke a function when the document loads
// Register the function f to run when the document finishes loading.
// If the document has already loaded, run it asynchronously ASAP.
function onLoad(f) {
if (onLoad.loaded)                  // If document is already loaded
window.setTimeout(f, 0);        // Queue f to be run as soon as possible
else if (window.addEventListener)   // Standard event registration method
window.addEventListener("load", f, false);
else if (window.attachEvent)        // IE8 and earlier use this instead
window.attachEvent("onload", f);
}
// Start by setting a flag that indicates that the document is not loaded yet.
onLoad.loaded = false;
// And register a function to set the flag when the document does load.
onLoad(function() { onLoad.loaded = true; });
13.3.3  Client-Side JavaScript Threading Model
The core JavaScript language does not contain any threading mechanism, and client-
side JavaScript has traditionally not defined any either. HTML5 defines “WebWorkers”
which serve as a kind of a background thread (more on web workers follows), but client-
side JavaScript still behaves as if it is strictly single-threaded. Even when concurrent
execution  is  possible,  client-side  JavaScript  cannot  ever  detect  the  fact  that  it  is
occurring.
Single-threaded execution makes for much simpler scripting: you can write code with
the assurance that two event handlers will never run at the same time. You can ma-
nipulate document content knowing that no other thread is attempting to modify it at
the same time, and you never need to worry about locks, deadlock, or race conditions
when writing JavaScript code.
Single-threaded execution means that web browsers must stop responding to user input
while scripts and event handlers are executing. This places a burden on JavaScript
programmers: it means that JavaScript scripts and event handlers must not run for too
long. If a script performs a computationally intensive task, it will introduce a delay into
document loading, and the user will not see the document content until the script
322 | Chapter 13: JavaScript in Web Browsers
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested