open pdf and draw c# : Add a link to a pdf software Library cloud windows asp.net web page class %5BO%60Reilly%5D%20-%20JavaScript.%20The%20Definitive%20Guide,%206th%20ed.%20-%20%5BFlanagan%5D4-part1570

convert text to a canonical form suitable for comparisons. JavaScript assumes that the
source code it is interpreting has already been normalized and makes no attempt to
normalize identifiers, strings, or regular expressions itself.
2.2  Comments
JavaScript supports two styles of comments. Any text between a 
//
and the end of a
line is treated as a comment and is ignored by JavaScript. Any text between the char-
acters 
/*
and 
*/
is also treated as a comment; these comments may span multiple lines
but may not be nested. The following lines of code are all legal JavaScript comments:
// This is a single-line comment.
/* This is also a comment */  // and here is another comment.
/*
* This is yet another comment.
* It has multiple lines.
*/
2.3  Literals
A literal is a data value that appears directly in a program. The following are all literals:
12               // The number twelve
1.2              // The number one point two
"hello world"    // A string of text
'Hi'             // Another string
true             // A Boolean value
false            // The other Boolean value
/javascript/gi   // A "regular expression" literal (for pattern matching)
null             // Absence of an object
Complete details on numeric and string literals appear in Chapter 3. Regular expression
literals are covered in Chapter 10. More complex expressions (see §4.2) can serve as
array and object literals. For example:
{ x:1, y:2 }    // An object initializer
[1,2,3,4,5]     // An array initializer
2.4  Identifiers and Reserved Words
An identifier is simply a name. In JavaScript, identifiers are used to name variables and
functions and to provide labels for certain loops in JavaScript code. A JavaScript iden-
tifier must begin with a letter, an underscore (
_
), or a dollar sign (
$
). Subsequent char-
acters can be letters, digits, underscores, or dollar signs. (Digits are not allowed as the
first character so that JavaScript can easily distinguish identifiers from numbers.) These
are all legal identifiers:
i
my_variable_name
v13
2.4  Identifiers and Reserved Words | 23
Core JavaScript
Add a link to a pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf link to attached file; add hyperlinks to pdf online
Add a link to a pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
c# read pdf from url; adding a link to a pdf
_dummy
$str
For portability and ease of editing, it is common to use only ASCII letters and digits in
identifiers. Note, however, that JavaScript allows identifiers to contain letters and digits
from the entire Unicode character set. (Technically, the ECMAScript standard also
allows Unicode characters from the obscure categories Mn, Mc, and Pc to appear in
identifiers after the first character.) This allows programmers to use variable names
from non-English languages and also to use mathematical symbols:
var sí = true;
var π = 3.14;
Like any language, JavaScript reserves certain identifiers for use by the language itself.
These “reserved words” cannot be used as regular identifiers. They are listed below.
2.4.1  Reserved Words
JavaScript reserves a number of identifiers as the keywords of the language itself. You
cannot use these words as identifiers in your programs:
break          delete         function       return         typeof
case           do             if             switch         var
catch          else           in             this           void
continue       false          instanceof     throw          while
debugger       finally        new            true           with
default        for            null           try
JavaScript also reserves certain keywords that are not currently used by the language
but which might be used in future versions. ECMAScript 5 reserves the following
words:
class     const     enum      export    extends   import    super
In addition, the following words, which are legal in ordinary JavaScript code, are re-
served in strict mode:
implements     let            private        public         yield
interface      package        protected      static
Strict mode also imposes restrictions on the use of the following identifiers. They are
not fully reserved, but they are not allowed as variable, function, or parameter names:
arguments      eval
ECMAScript 3 reserved all the keywords of the Java language, and although this has
been relaxed in ECMAScript 5, you should still avoid all of these identifiers if you plan
to run your code under an ECMAScript 3 implementation of JavaScript:
abstract       double         goto           native         static
boolean        enum           implements     package        super
byte           export         import         private        synchronized
char           extends        int            protected      throws
class          final          interface      public         transient
const          float          long           short          volatile
24 | Chapter 2: Lexical Structure
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C#
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; add link to pdf
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
add hyperlinks to pdf; adding hyperlinks to a pdf
JavaScript predefines a number of global variables and functions, and you should avoid
using their names for your own variables and functions:
arguments           encodeURI           Infinity  Number          RegExp
Array               encodeURIComponent  isFinite  Object          String
Boolean             Error               isNaN     parseFloat      SyntaxError
Date                eval                JSON      parseInt        TypeError
decodeURI           EvalError           Math      RangeError      undefined
decodeURIComponent  Function            NaN       ReferenceError  URIError
Keep in mind that JavaScript implementations may define other global variables and
functions, and each specific JavaScript embedding (client-side, server-side, etc.) will
have its own list of global properties. See the Window object in Part IV for a list of the
global variables and functions defined by client-side JavaScript.
2.5  Optional Semicolons
Like many programming languages, JavaScript uses the semicolon (
;
) to separate state-
ments (see Chapter 5) from each other. This is important to make the meaning of your
code clear: without a separator, the end of one statement might appear to be the be-
ginning of the next, or vice versa. In JavaScript, you can usually omit the semicolon
between two statements if those statements are written on separate lines. (You can also
omit a semicolon at the end of a program or if the next token in the program is a closing
curly brace 
}
.) Many JavaScript programmers (and the code in this book) use semico-
lons to explicitly mark the ends of statements, even where they are not required.
Another style is to omit semicolons whenever possible, using them only in the few
situations that require them. Whichever style you choose, there are a few details you
should understand about optional semicolons in JavaScript.
Consider the following code. Since the two statements appear on separate lines, the
first semicolon could be omitted:
a = 3;
b = 4;
Written as follows, however, the first semicolon is required:
a = 3; b = 4;
Note that JavaScript does not treat every line break as a semicolon: it usually treats line
breaks as semicolons only if it can’t parse the code without the semicolons. More for-
mally (and with two exceptions described below), JavaScript treats a line break as a
semicolon if the next nonspace character cannot be interpreted as a continuation of the
current statement. Consider the following code:
var a
a
=
3
console.log(a)
2.5  Optional Semicolons | 25
Core JavaScript
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; adding an email link to a pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
add email link to pdf; add hyperlinks pdf file
JavaScript interprets this code like this:
var a; a = 3; console.log(a);
JavaScript does treat the first line break as a semicolon because it cannot parse the code
var a a
without a semicolon. The second 
a
could stand alone as the statement 
a;
, but
JavaScript does not treat the second line break as a semicolon because it can continue
parsing the longer statement 
a = 3;
.
These statement termination rules lead to some surprising cases. This code looks like
two separate statements separated with a newline:
var y = x + f
(a+b).toString()
But the parentheses on the second line of code can be interpreted as a function invo-
cation of 
f
from the first line, and JavaScript interprets the code like this:
var y = x + f(a+b).toString();
More likely than not, this is not the interpretation intended by the author of the code.
In order to work as two separate statements, an explicit semicolon is required in this
case.
In general, if a statement begins with 
(
[
/
+
, or 
-
, there is a chance that it could be
interpreted as a continuation of the statement before. Statements beginning with 
/
+
,
and 
-
are quite rare in practice, but statements beginning with 
(
and 
[
are not uncom-
mon at all, at least in some styles of JavaScript programming. Some programmers like
to put a defensive semicolon at the beginning of any such statement so that it will
continue to work correctly even if the statement before it is modified and a previously
terminating semicolon removed:
var x = 0                         // Semicolon omitted here
;[x,x+1,x+2].forEach(console.log) // Defensive ; keeps this statement separate
There are two exceptions to the general rule that JavaScript interprets line breaks as
semicolons when it cannot parse the second line as a continuation of the statement on
the first line. The first exception involves the 
return
break
, and 
continue
statements
(see Chapter 5). These statements often stand alone, but they are sometimes followed
by an identifier or expression. If a line break appears after any of these words (before
any other tokens), JavaScript will always interpret that line break as a semicolon. For
example, if you write:
return
true;
26 | Chapter 2: Lexical Structure
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add a link to a pdf in preview; adding hyperlinks to pdf documents
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
pdf email link; add hyperlink to pdf
JavaScript assumes you meant:
return; true;
However, you probably meant:
return true;
What this means is that you must not insert a line break between 
return
break
or
continue
and the expression that follows the keyword. If you do insert a line break,
your code is likely to fail in a nonobvious way that is difficult to debug.
The second exception involves the 
++
and 
−−
operators (§4.8). These operators can be
prefix operators that appear before an expression or postfix operators that appear after
an expression. If you want to use either of these operators as postfix operators, they
must appear on the same line as the expression they apply to. Otherwise, the line break
will be treated as a semicolon, and the 
++
or 
--
will be parsed as a prefix operator applied
to the code that follows. Consider this code, for example:
x
++
y
It is parsed as 
x; ++y;
, not as 
x++; y
.
2.5  Optional Semicolons | 27
Core JavaScript
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
pdf link to email; pdf link
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
add url link to pdf; pdf link to specific page
CHAPTER 3
Types, Values, and Variables
Computer programs work by manipulating values, such as the number 3.14 or the text
“Hello World.” The kinds of values that can be represented and manipulated in a
programming language are known as types, and one of the most fundamental charac-
teristics of a programming language is the set of types it supports. When a program
needs to retain a value for future use, it assigns the value to (or “stores” the value in) a
variable. A variable defines a symbolic name for a value and allows the value to be
referred to by name. The way that variables work is another fundamental characteristic
of any programming language. This chapter explains types, values, and variables in
JavaScript. These introductory paragraphs provide an overview, and you may find it
helpful to refer to §1.1 while you read them. The sections that follow cover these topics
in depth.
JavaScript types can be divided into two categories: primitive types and object types.
JavaScript’s primitive types include numbers, strings of text (known as strings), and
Boolean truth values (known as booleans). A significant portion of this chapter is dedi-
cated to a detailed explanation of the numeric (§3.1) and string (§3.2) types in Java-
Script. Booleans are covered in §3.3.
The special JavaScript values 
null
and 
undefined
are primitive values, but they are not
numbers, strings, or booleans. Each value is typically considered to be the sole member
of its own special type. §3.4 has more about 
null
and 
undefined
.
Any JavaScript value that is not a number, a string, a boolean, or 
null
or 
undefined
is
an object. An object (that is, a member of the type object) is a collection of properties
where each property has a name and a value (either a primitive value, such as a number
or string, or an object). One very special object, the global object, is covered in §3.5,
but more general and more detailed coverage of objects is in Chapter 6.
An ordinary JavaScript object is an unordered collection of named values. The language
also defines a special kind of object, known as an array, that represents an ordered
collection of numbered values. The JavaScript language includes special syntax for
working with arrays, and arrays have some special behavior that distinguishes them
from ordinary objects. Arrays are the subject of Chapter 7.
29
JavaScript defines another special kind of object, known as a function. A function is an
object that has executable code associated with it. A function may be invoked to run
that executable code and return a computed value. Like arrays, functions behave dif-
ferently from other kinds of objects, and JavaScript defines a special language syntax
for working with them. The most important thing about functions in JavaScript is that
they are true values and that JavaScript programs can treat them like regular objects.
Functions are covered in Chapter 8.
Functions that are written to be used (with the 
new
operator) to initialize a newly created
object are known as constructors. Each constructor defines a class of objects—the set
of objects initialized by that constructor. Classes can be thought of as subtypes of the
object type. In addition to the Array and Function classes, core JavaScript defines three
other useful classes. The Date class defines objects that represent dates. The RegExp
class defines objects that represent regular expressions (a powerful pattern-matching
tool described in Chapter 10). And the Error class defines objects that represent syntax
and runtime errors that can occur in a JavaScript program. You can define your own
classes of objects by defining appropriate constructor functions. This is explained in
Chapter 9.
The JavaScript interpreter performs automatic garbage collection for memory manage-
ment. This means that a program can create objects as needed, and the programmer
never needs to worry about destruction or deallocation of those objects. When an object
is no longer reachable—when a program no longer has any way to refer to it—the
interpreter knows it can never be used again and automatically reclaims the memory it
was occupying.
JavaScript is an object-oriented language. Loosely, this means that rather than having
globally defined functions to operate on values of various types, the types themselves
define methods for working with values. To sort the elements of an array 
a
, for example,
we don’t pass 
a
to a 
sort()
function. Instead, we invoke the 
sort()
method of 
a
:
a.sort();       // The object-oriented version of sort(a).
Method definition is covered in Chapter 9. Technically, it is only JavaScript objects
that have methods. But numbers, strings, and boolean values behave as if they had
methods (§3.6 explains how this works). In JavaScript, 
null
and 
undefined
are the only
values that methods cannot be invoked on.
JavaScript’s types can be divided into primitive types and object types. And they can
be divided into types with methods and types without. They can also be categorized as
mutable and immutable types. A value of a mutable type can change. Objects and arrays
are mutable: a JavaScript program can change the values of object properties and array
elements. Numbers, booleans, 
null
, and 
undefined
are immutable—it doesn’t even
make sense to talk about changing the value of a number, for example. Strings can be
thought of as arrays of characters, and you might expect them to be mutable. In Java-
Script, however, strings are immutable: you can access the text at any index of a string,
30 | Chapter 3: Types, Values, and Variables
but JavaScript provides no way to alter the text of an existing string. The differences
between mutable and immutable values are explored further in §3.7.
JavaScript converts values liberally from one type to another. If a program expects a
string, for example, and you give it a number, it will automatically convert the number
to a string for you. If you use a nonboolean value where a boolean is expected, JavaScript
will convert accordingly. The rules for value conversion are explained in §3.8. Java-
Script’s liberal value conversion rules affect its definition of equality, and the 
==
equality
operator performs type conversions as described in §3.8.1.
JavaScript variables are untyped: you can assign a value of any type to a variable, and
you can later assign a value of a different type to the same variable. Variables are
declared with the 
var
keyword. JavaScript uses lexical scoping. Variables declared out-
side of a function are global variables and are visible everywhere in a JavaScript program.
Variables declared inside a function have function scope and are visible only to code
that appears inside that function. Variable declaration and scope are covered in §3.9
and §3.10.
3.1  Numbers
Unlike many languages, JavaScript does not make a distinction between integer values
and floating-point values. All numbers in JavaScript are represented as floating-point
values. JavaScript represents numbers using the 64-bit floating-point format defined
by the IEEE 754 standard,
1
which means it can represent numbers as large as
±1.7976931348623157 × 10
308
and as small as ±5 × 10
−324
.
The JavaScript number format allows you to exactly represent all integers between
−9007199254740992 (−253) and 9007199254740992 (253), inclusive. If you use integer
values larger than this, you may lose precision in the trailing digits. Note, however, that
certain operations in JavaScript (such as array indexing and the bitwise operators de-
scribed in Chapter 4) are performed with 32-bit integers.
When a number appears directly in a JavaScript program, it’s called a numeric literal.
JavaScript supports numeric literals in several formats, as described in the following
sections. Note that any numeric literal can be preceded by a minus sign (-) to make the
number negative. Technically, however, - is the unary negation operator (see Chap-
ter 4) and is not part of the numeric literal syntax.
1.This format should be familiar to Java programmers as the format of the 
double
type. It is also the
double
format used in almost all modern implementations of C and C++.
3.1  Numbers | 31
Core JavaScript
3.1.1  Integer Literals
In a JavaScript program, a base-10 integer is written as a sequence of digits. For
example:
0
3
10000000
In addition to base-10 integer literals, JavaScript recognizes hexadecimal (base-16) val-
ues. A hexadecimal literal begins with “0x” or “0X”, followed by a string of hexadecimal
digits. A hexadecimal digit is one of the digits 0 through 9 or the letters a (or A) through
f (or F), which represent values 10 through 15. Here are examples of hexadecimal in-
teger literals:
0xff  // 15*16 + 15 = 255 (base 10)
0xCAFE911
Although the ECMAScript standard does not support them, some implementations of
JavaScript allow you to specify integer literals in octal (base-8) format. An octal literal
begins with the digit 0 and is followed by a sequence of digits, each between 0 and 7.
For example:
0377  // 3*64 + 7*8 + 7 = 255 (base 10)
Since some implementations support octal literals and some do not, you should never
write an integer literal with a leading zero; you cannot know in this case whether an
implementation will interpret it as an octal or decimal value. In the strict mode of
ECMAScript 5 (§5.7.3), octal literals are explicitly forbidden.
3.1.2  Floating-Point Literals
Floating-point literals can have a decimal point; they use the traditional syntax for real
numbers. A real value is represented as the integral part of the number, followed by a
decimal point and the fractional part of the number.
Floating-point literals may also be represented using exponential notation: a real num-
ber followed by the letter e (or E), followed by an optional plus or minus sign, followed
by an integer exponent. This notation represents the real number multiplied by 10 to
the power of the exponent.
More succinctly, the syntax is:
[digits][.digits][(E|e)[(+|-)]digits]
For example:
3.14
2345.789
.333333333333333333
6.02e23        // 6.02 × 10
23
1.4738223E-32  // 1.4738223 × 10
−32
32 | Chapter 3: Types, Values, and Variables
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested