open pdf and draw c# : Add links to pdf document SDK application service wpf html web page dnn %5BO%60Reilly%5D%20-%20JavaScript.%20The%20Definitive%20Guide,%206th%20ed.%20-%20%5BFlanagan%5D54-part1586

CHAPTER 19
The jQuery Library
JavaScript has an intentionally simple core API and an overly complicated client-side
API that is marred by major incompatibilities between browsers. The arrival of IE9
eliminates the worst of those incompatibilities, but many programmers find it easier to
write web applications using a JavaScript framework or utility library to simplify com-
mon tasks and hide the differences between browsers. At the time of this writing, one
of the most popular and widely used such libraries is jQuery.
1
Because the jQuery library has become so widely used, web developers should be fa-
miliar with it: even if you don’t use it in your own code, you are likely to encounter it
in code written by others. Fortunately, jQuery is stable and small enough to document
in this book. You’ll find a comprehensive introduction in this chapter, and Part IV
includes a 
jQuery
quick reference. jQuery methods do not have individual entries in
the reference section, but the 
jQuery
gives a synopsis of each method.
jQuery makes it easy to find the elements of a document that you care about and then
manipulate those elements by adding content, editing HTML attributes and CSS prop-
erties, defining event handlers, and performing animations. It also has Ajax utilities for
dynamically making HTTP requests and general-purpose utility functions for working
with objects and arrays.
As its name implies, the jQuery library is focused on queries. A typical query uses a CSS
selector to identify a set of document elements and returns an object that represents
those elements. This returned object provides many useful methods for operating on
the matching elements as a group. Whenever possible, these methods return the object
on which they are invoked, which allows a succinct method chaining idiom to be used.
These features are at the heart of jQuery’s power and utility:
• An expressive syntax (CSS selectors) for referring to elements in the document
1. Other commonly used libraries not covered in this book include Prototype, YUI, and dojo. Search the
Web for “JavaScript libraries” to find many more.
523
Add links to pdf document - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
clickable links in pdf; adding a link to a pdf in preview
Add links to pdf document - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlink to pdf; add links to pdf in acrobat
• An efficient query method for finding the set of document elements that match a
CSS selector
• A useful set of methods for manipulating selected elements
• Powerful functional programming techniques for operating on sets of elements as
a group, rather than one at a time
• A succinct idiom (method chaining) for expressing sequences of operations
This chapter begins with an introduction to jQuery that shows how to make simple
queries and work with the results. The sections that follow explain:
• How to set HTML attributes, CSS styles and classes, HTML form values and ele-
ment content, geometry, and data
• How to alter the structure of a document by inserting, replacing, wrapping, and
deleting elements
• How to use jQuery’s cross-browser event model
• How to produce animated visual effects with jQuery
• jQuery’s Ajax utilities for making scripted HTTP requests
• jQuery’s utility functions
• The full syntax of jQuery’s selectors, and how to use jQuery’s advanced selection
methods
• How to extend jQuery by using and writing plug-ins
• The jQuery UI library
19.1  jQuery Basics
The jQuery library defines a single global function named 
jQuery()
. This function is so
frequently used that the library also defines the global symbol 
$
as a shortcut for it.
These are the only two symbols jQuery defines in the global namespace.
2
This single global function with two names is the central query function for jQuery.
Here, for example, is how we ask for the set of all 
<div>
elements in a document:
var divs = $("div");
The value returned by this function represents a set of zero or more DOM elements
and is known as a jQuery object. Note that 
jQuery()
is a factory function rather than
a constructor: it returns a newly created object but is not used with the 
new
keyword.
jQuery objects define many methods for operating on the sets of elements they repre-
sent, and most of this chapter is devoted to explaining those methods. Below, for ex-
ample, is code that finds, highlights, and quickly displays all hidden 
<p>
elements that
have a class of “details”:
2. If you use 
$
in your own code, or are using another library, such as Prototype, that uses 
$
, you can call
jQuery.noConflict()
to restore 
$
to its original value.
524 | Chapter 19: The jQuery Library
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Add necessary references:
pdf hyperlinks; adding links to pdf
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
edit, delete links. Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically. Read form data from PDF form file. Add, Update, Delete form fields programmatically. Document
add hyperlink pdf file; add links in pdf
$("p.details").css("background-color", "yellow").show("fast");
The 
css()
method operates on the jQuery object returned by 
$()
, and returns that same
object, so that the 
show()
method can be invoked next in a compact “method chain.”
This method chaining idiom is common in jQuery programming. As another example,
the code below finds all elements in the document that have the CSS class “clicktohide”
and registers an event handler on each one. That event handler is invoked when the
user clicks on the element and makes the element slowly “slide up” and disappear:
$(".clicktohide").click(function() { $(this).slideUp("slow"); });
Obtaining jQuery
The jQuery library is free software. You can download it from http://jquery.com . Once
you have the code, you can include it in your web pages with a 
<script>
element
like this:
<script src="jquery-1.4.2.min.js"></script>
The “min” in the filename above indicates that this is the minimized version of the
library, with unnecessary comments and whitespace removed, and internal identifiers
replaced with shorter ones.
Another way to use jQuery in your web applications is to allow a content distribution
network to serve it using a URL like one of these:
http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.4.2.min.js
http://ajax.microsoft.com/ajax/jquery/jquery-1.4.2.min.js
http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.2/jquery.min.js
This chapter documents jQuery version 1.4. If you are using a different version, you
should replace the “1.4.2” version number in the URLs above as necessary.
3
If you use
the Google CDN, you can use “1.4” to get the latest release in the 1.4.x series, or just
“1” to get the most current release less than 2.0. The major advantage of loading
jQuery
from well-known URLs like these is that, because of jQuery’s popularity, visitors
to your website will likely already have a copy of the library in their browser’s cache
and no download will be necessary.
19.1.1  The jQuery() Function
The 
jQuery()
function (a.k.a. 
$()
) is the most important one in the jQuery library. It is
heavily overloaded, however, and there are four different ways you can invoke it.
The first, and most common, way to invoke 
$()
is to pass a CSS selector (a string) to
it. When called this way, it returns the set of elements from the current document that
match the selector. jQuery supports most of the CSS3 selector syntax, plus some ex-
tensions of its own. Complete details of the jQuery selector syntax are in §19.8.1. If
3. When this chapter was written, the current version of jQuery was 1.4.2. As the book goes to press,
jQuery 1.5 has just been released. The changes in jQuery 1.5 mostly involve the Ajax utility function,
and they will be mentioned in passing in §19.6.
19.1  jQuery Basics | 525
Client-Side
JavaScript
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
adding links to pdf document; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
adding a link to a pdf; add hyperlink to pdf online
you pass an element or a jQuery object as the second argument to 
$()
, it returns only
matching descendants of the specified element or elements. This optional second ar-
gument value defines the starting point (or points) for the query and is often called the
context.
The second way to invoke 
$()
is to pass it an Element or Document or Window object.
Called like this, it simply wraps the element, document, or window in a jQuery object
and returns that object. Doing this allows you to use jQuery methods to manipulate
the element rather than using raw DOM methods. It is common to see jQuery programs
call 
$(document)
or 
$(this)
, for example. jQuery objects can represent more than one
element in a document, and you can also pass an array of elements to 
$()
. In this case,
the returned jQuery object represents the set of elements in your array.
The third way to invoke 
$()
is to pass it a string of HTML text. When you do this,
jQuery creates the HTML element or elements described by that text and then returns
a jQuery object representing those elements. jQuery does not automatically insert the
newly created elements into the document, but the jQuery methods described in
§19.3 allow you to easily insert them where you want them. Note that you cannot pass
plain text when you invoke 
$()
in this way, or jQuery will think you are passing a CSS
selector. For this style of invocation, the string you pass to 
$()
must include at least
one HTML tag with angle brackets.
When invoked in this third way, 
$()
accepts an optional second argument. You can
pass a Document object to specify the document with which the elements are to be
associated. (If you are creating elements to be inserted into an 
<iframe>
, for example,
you’ll need to explicitly specify the document object of that frame.) Or you can pass
an object as the second argument. If you do this, the object properties are assumed to
specify the names and values of HTML attributes to be set on the object. But if the
object  includes  properties with any  of the names “css”, “html”, “text”, “width”,
“height”, “offset”, “val”, or “data”, or properties that have the same name as any of
the jQuery event handler registration methods, jQuery will invoke the method of the
same name on the newly created element and pass the property value to it. (Methods
like 
css()
html()
, and 
text()
are covered in §19.2 and event handler registration
methods are in §19.4. For example:
var img = $("<img/>",                // Create a new <img> element
{ src:url,               // with this HTML attribute,
css: {borderWidth:5},  // this CSS style,
click: handleClick     // and this event handler.
});
Finally, the fourth way to invoke 
$()
is to pass a function to it. If you do this, the function
you pass will be invoked when the document has been loaded and the DOM is ready
to be manipulated. This is the jQuery version of the 
onLoad()
function from Exam-
ple 13-5. It is very common to see jQuery programs written as anonymous functions
defined within a call to 
jQuery()
:
526 | Chapter 19: The jQuery Library
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness). C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C# Add necessary references
add links to pdf online; add a link to a pdf file
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. a PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
clickable links in pdf files; add url to pdf
jQuery(function() {  // Invoked when the document has loaded
// All jQuery code goes here
});
You’ll  sometimes  see 
$(f)
written  using  the  older  and  more  verbose  form:
$(document).ready(f)
.
The function you pass to 
jQuery()
will be invoked with the document object as its
this
value and with the 
jQuery
function as its single argument. This means that you
can undefine the global 
$
function and still use that convenient alias locally with this
idiom:
jQuery.noConflict();  // Restore $ to its original state
jQuery(function($) {  // Use $ as a local alias for the jQuery object
// Put all your jQuery code here
});
jQuery triggers functions registered through 
$()
when the DOMContentLoaded event
is fired (§13.3.4) or, in browsers that don’t support that event, when the load event is
fired. This means that the document will be completely parsed, but that external re-
sources such as images may not be loaded yet. If you pass a function to 
$()
after the
DOM is ready, that function will be invoked immediately, before 
$()
returns.
The jQuery library also uses the 
jQuery()
function as its namespace and defines a num-
ber of utility functions and properties under it. The 
jQuery.noConflict()
function
mentioned above is one such utility function. Others include 
jQuery.each()
for general-
purpose iteration and 
jQuery.parseJSON()
for parsing JSON text. §19.7 lists general-
purpose utility functions, and other jQuery functions are described throughout this
chapter.
jQuery Terminology
Let’s pause here to define some important terms and phrases that you’ll see throughout
this chapter:
“the jQuery function”
The jQuery function is the value of 
jQuery
or of 
$
. This is the function that creates
jQuery objects, registers handlers to be invoked when the DOM is ready, and that
also serves as the jQuery namespace. I usually refer to it as 
$()
. Because it serves
as a namespace, the jQuery function might also be called “the global jQuery ob-
ject,” but it is very important not to confuse it with “a jQuery object.”
“a jQuery object”
A jQuery object is an object returned by the jQuery function. A jQuery object
represents a set of document elements and can also be called a “jQuery result,” a
“jQuery set,” or a “wrapped set.”
“the selected elements”
When you pass a CSS selector to the jQuery function, it returns a jQuery object
that represents the set of document elements that match that selector. When de-
scribing the methods of the jQuery object, I’ll often use the phrase “the selected
elements” to refer to those matching elements. For example, to explain the
19.1  jQuery Basics | 527
Client-Side
JavaScript
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Management Using C#.NET Imaging
detailed C# tutorials on each part by following the links respectively. are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks; add hyperlink to pdf in
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
clickable links in pdf from word; add email link to pdf
attr()
method, I might write “the 
attr()
method sets HTML attributes on the
selected elements.” This is instead of a more precise but awkward description like
“the 
attr()
method sets HTML attributes on the elements of the jQuery object on
which it was invoked.” Note that the word “selected” refers to the CSS selector
and has nothing to do with any selection performed by the user.
“a jQuery function”
A jQuery function is a function like 
jQuery.noConflict()
that is defined in the
namespace of the jQuery function. jQuery functions might also be described as
“static methods.”
“a jQuery method”
A jQuery method is a method of a jQuery object returned by the jQuery function.
The most important part of the jQuery library is the powerful methods it defines.
The distinction between jQuery functions and methods is sometimes tricky because a
number of functions and methods have the same name. Note the differences between
these two lines of code:
// Call the jQuery function each() to
// invoke the function f once for each element of the array a
$.each(a,f);
// Call the jQuery() function to obtain a jQuery object that represents all
// <a> elements in the document. Then call the each() method of that jQuery 
// object to invoke the function f once for each selected element.
$("a").each(f);
The official jQuery documentation at http://jquery.com  uses names like 
$.each
to refer
to jQuery functions and names like 
.each
(with a period but without a dollar sign) to
refer to jQuery methods. In this book, I’ll use the terms “function” and “method”
instead. Usually it will be clear from the context which is being discussed.
19.1.2  Queries and Query Results
When you pass a CSS selector string to 
$()
, it returns a jQuery object that represents
the  set  of  matched  (or  “selected”)  elements.  CSS  selectors  were  introduced  in
§15.2.5, and you can review that section for examples—all of the examples shown
there work when passed to 
$()
. The specific selector syntax supported by jQuery is
detailed in §19.8.1. Rather than focus on those advanced selector details now, however,
we’re going to first explore what you can do with the results of a query.
The value returned by 
$()
is a jQuery object. jQuery objects are array-like: they have a
length
property and have numeric properties from 0 to 
length
-1. (See §7.11 for more
on array-like objects.) This means that you can access the contents of the jQuery object
using standard square-bracket array notation:
$("body").length   // => 1: documents have only a single body element
$("body")[0]       // This the same as document.body
If you prefer not to use array notation with jQuery objects, you can use the 
size()
method instead of the 
length
property and the 
get()
method instead of indexing with
528 | Chapter 19: The jQuery Library
square brackets. If you need to convert a jQuery object to a true array, call the
toArray()
method.
In addition to the 
length
property, jQuery objects have three other properties that are
sometimes of interest. The 
selector
property is the selector string (if any) that was used
when the jQuery object was created. The 
context
property is the context object that
was passed as the second argument to 
$()
, or the Document object otherwise. Finally,
all jQuery objects have a property named 
jquery
, and testing for the existence of this
property is a simple way to distinguish jQuery objects from other array-like objects.
The value of the 
jquery
property is the jQuery version number as a string:
// Find all <script> elements in the document body
var bodyscripts = $("script", document.body);
bodyscripts.selector   // => "script"
bodyscripts.context    // => document.body
bodyscripts.jquery     // => "1.4.2"
$() versus querySelectorAll()
The 
$()
function is similar to the Document method 
querySelectorAll()
that was de-
scribed in §15.2.5: both take a CSS selector as their argument and return an array-like
object that holds the elements that match the selector. The jQuery implementation uses
querySelectorAll()
in browsers that support it, but there are good reasons to use 
$()
instead of 
querySelectorAll()
in your own code:
querySelectorAll()
has only recently been implemented by browser vendors.
$()
works in older browsers as well as new ones.
• Because jQuery can perform selections “by hand,” the CSS3 selectors supported
by 
$()
work in all browsers, not just those browsers that support CSS3.
• The array-like object returned by 
$()
(a jQuery object) is much more useful than
the array-like object (a NodeList) returned by 
querySelectorAll()
.
If you want to loop over all elements in a jQuery object, you can call the 
each()
method
instead of writing a 
for
loop. The 
each()
method is something like the ECMAScript 5
(ES5) 
forEach()
array method. It expects a callback function as its sole argument, and
it invokes that callback function once for each element in the jQuery object (in docu-
ment order). The callback is invoked as a method of the matched element, so within
the callback the 
this
keyword refers to an Element object. 
each()
also passes the index
and the element as the first and second arguments to the callback. Note that 
this
and
the second argument are raw document elements, not jQuery objects; if you want to
use a jQuery method to manipulate the element, you’ll need to pass it to 
$()
first.
jQuery’s 
each()
method has one feature that is quite different than 
forEach()
: if your
callback returns 
false
for any element, iteration is terminated after that element (this
is like using the 
break
keyword in a normal loop). 
each()
returns the jQuery object on
which it is called, so that it can be used in method chains. Here is an example (it uses
the 
prepend()
method that will be explained in §19.3):
19.1  jQuery Basics | 529
Client-Side
JavaScript
// Number the divs of the document, up to and including div#last
$("div").each(function(idx) { // find all <div>s, and iterate through them
$(this).prepend(idx + ": ");          // Insert index at start of each
if (this.id === "last") return false; // Stop at element #last
});
Despite the power of the 
each()
method, it is not very commonly used, since jQuery
methods usually iterate implicitly over the set of matched elements and operate on them
all. You typically only need to use 
each()
if you need to manipulate the matched ele-
ments in different ways. Even then, you may not need to call 
each()
, since a number
of jQuery methods allow you to pass a callback function.
The jQuery library predates the ES5 array methods, and it defines a couple of other
methods that provide functionality similar to the ES5 methods. The jQuery method
map()
works much like the 
Array.map()
method. It accepts a callback function as its
argument and invokes that function once for each element of the jQuery object, col-
lecting the return values of those invocations, and returning a new jQuery object hold-
ing those return values. 
map()
invokes the callback in the same way that the 
each()
method does: the element is passed as the 
this
value and as the second argument and
the index of the element is passed as the first argument. If the callback returns 
null
or
undefined
, that value is ignored and nothing is added to the new jQuery object for that
invocation. If the callback returns an array or an array-like object (such as a jQuery
object), it is “flattened” and its elements are added individually to the new jQuery
object. Note that the jQuery object returned by 
map()
may not hold document elements,
but it still works as an array-like object. Here is an example:
// Find all headings, map to their ids, convert to a true array, and sort it.
$(":header").map(function() { return this.id; }).toArray().sort();
Along with 
each()
and 
map()
, another fundamental jQuery method is 
index()
. This
method expects an element as its argument and returns the index of that element in
the jQuery object, or –1 if it is not found. In typical jQuery fashion, however, this
index()
method is overloaded. If you pass a jQuery object as the argument, 
index()
searches for the first element of that object. If you pass a string, 
index()
uses it as a CSS
selector and returns the index of the first element of this jQuery object in the set of
elements matching that selector. And if you pass no argument, 
index()
returns the index
of the first element of this jQuery object within its sibling elements.
The final general-purpose jQuery method we’ll discuss here is 
is()
. It takes a selector
as its argument and returns 
true
if at least one of the selected elements also matches
the specified selector. You might use it in an 
each()
callback function, for example:
$("div").each(function() {   // For each <div> element
if ($(this).is(":hidden")) return;  // Skip hidden elements
// Do something with the visible ones here
});
530 | Chapter 19: The jQuery Library
19.2  jQuery Getters and Setters
Some of the simplest, and most common, operations on jQuery objects are those that
get or set the value of HTML attributes, CSS styles, element content, or element
geometry. This section describes those methods. First, however, it is worth making
some generalizations about getter and setter methods in jQuery:
• Rather than defining a pair of methods, jQuery uses a single method as both getter
and setter. If you pass a new value to the method, it sets that value; if you don’t
specify a value, it returns the current value.
• When used as setters, these methods set values on every element in the jQuery
object, and then return the jQuery object to allow method chaining.
• When used as getters, these methods query only the first element of the set of
elements and return a single value. (Use 
map()
if you want to query all elements.)
Since getters do not return the jQuery object they are invoked on, they can only
appear at the end of a method chain.
• When used as setters, these methods often accept object arguments. In this case,
each property of the object specifies a name and a value to be set.
• When used as setters, these methods often accept functions as values. In this case,
the function is invoked to compute the value to be set. The element that the value
is being computed for is the 
this
value, the element index is passed as the first
argument to the function, and the current value is passed as the second argument.
Keep these generalizations about getters and setters in mind as you read the rest of this
section. Each subsection below explains an important category of jQuery getter/setter
methods.
19.2.1  Getting and Setting HTML Attributes
The 
attr()
method is the jQuery getter/setter for HTML attributes, and it adheres to
each of the generalizations described above. 
attr()
handles browser incompatibilities
and special cases and allows you to use either HTML attribute names or their JavaScript
property equivalents (where they differ). For example, you can use either “for” or
“htmlFor” and either “class” or “className”. 
removeAttr()
is a related function that
completely removes an attribute from all selected elements. Here are some examples:
$("form").attr("action");                // Query the action attr of 1st form
$("#icon").attr("src", "icon.gif");      // Set the src attribute 
$("#banner").attr({src:"banner.gif",     // Set 4 attributes at once
alt:"Advertisement",
width:720, height:64});
$("a").attr("target", "_blank");         // Make all links load in new windows
$("a").attr("target", function() {       // Load local links locally and load
if (this.host == location.host) return "_self"
else return "_blank";                // off-site links in a new window
});
19.2  jQuery Getters and Setters | 531
Client-Side
JavaScript
$("a").attr({target: function() {...}}); // We can also pass functions like this
$("a").removeAttr("target");             // Make all links load in this window
19.2.2  Getting and Setting CSS Attributes
The 
css()
method is very much like the 
attr()
method, but it works with the CSS styles
of an element rather than the HTML attributes of the element. When querying style
values, 
css()
returns the current (or “computed”; see §16.4) style of the element: the
returned value may come from the 
style
attribute or from a stylesheet. Note that it is
not possible to query compound styles such as “font” or “margin”. You must instead
query individual styles such as “font-weight”, “font-family”, “margin-top”, or “margin-
left”. When setting styles, the 
css()
method simply adds the style to the element’s
style
attribute. 
css()
allows you to use hyphenated CSS style names (“background-
color”) or camel-case JavaScript style names (“backgroundColor”). When querying
style values, 
css()
returns numeric values as strings, with units suffixes included. When
setting, however, it converts numbers to strings and adds a “px” (pixels) suffix to them
when necessary:
$("h1").css("font-weight");              // Get font weight of first <h1>
$("h1").css("fontWeight");               // Camel case works, too
$("h1").css("font");                     // Error: can't query compound styles
$("h1").css("font-variant",              // Set a style on all <h1> elements
"smallcaps");         
$("div.note").css("border",              // Okay to set compound styles
"solid black 2px");
$("h1").css({ backgroundColor: "black",  // Set multiple styles at once
textColor: "white",        // camelCase names work better
fontVariant: "small-caps", // as object properties
padding: "10px 2px 4px 20px",
border: "dotted black 4px" });
// Increase all <h1> font sizes by 25%
$("h1").css("font-size", function(i,curval) {    
return Math.round(1.25*parseInt(curval));
});
19.2.3  Getting and Setting CSS Classes
Recall that the value of the 
class
attribute (accessed via the 
className
property in Java-
Script) is interpreted as a space-separated list of CSS class names. Usually, we want to
add, remove, or test for the presence of a single name in the list rather than replacing
one list of classes with another. For this reason, jQuery defines convenience methods
for working with the 
class
attribute. 
addClass()
and 
removeClass()
add and remove
classes from the selected elements. 
toggleClass()
adds classes to elements that don’t
already have them and removes classes from those that do. 
hasClass()
tests for the
presence of a specified class. Here are some examples:
// Adding CSS classes
$("h1").addClass("hilite");            // Add a class to all <h1> elements
$("h1+p").addClass("hilite first");    // Add 2 classes to <p> elts after <h1>
$("section").addClass(function(n) {    // Pass a function to add a custom class
return "section" + n;              //  to each matched element
532 | Chapter 19: The jQuery Library
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested