open pdf and draw c# : Add a link to a pdf file SDK Library API .net asp.net web page sharepoint %5BO%60Reilly%5D%20-%20JavaScript.%20The%20Definitive%20Guide,%206th%20ed.%20-%20%5BFlanagan%5D58-part1590

If either the URL or data string passed to 
jQuery.getJSON()
contains the string “=?” at
the end of the string or before an ampersand, it is taken to specify a JSONP request.
(See §18.2 for an explanation of JSONP.) jQuery will replace the question mark with
the name of a callback function it creates, and 
jQuery.getJSON()
will then behave as if
a script is being requested rather than a JSON object. This does not work for static
JSON data files: it only works with server-side scripts that support JSONP. Because
JSONP requests are handled as scripts, however, it does mean that JSON-formatted
data can be requested cross-domain.
19.6.2.3  jQuery.get() and jQuery.post()
jQuery.get()
and 
jQuery.post()
fetch the content of the specified URL, passing the
specified data, if any, and pass the result to the specified callback. 
jQuery.get()
does
this using an HTTP GET request and 
jQuery.post()
uses a POST request, but otherwise
these two utility functions are the same. These two methods take the same three argu-
ments that 
jQuery.getJSON()
does: a required URL, an optional data string or object,
and a technically optional but almost always used callback function. The callback
function is invoked with the returned data as its first argument, the string “success” as
its second, and the XMLHttpRequest (if there was one) as its third:
// Request text from the server and display it in an alert dialog
jQuery.get("debug.txt", alert);
In addition to the three arguments described above, these two methods accept a fourth
optional argument (passed as the third argument if the data is omitted) that specifies
the type of the data being requested. This fourth argument affects the way the data is
processed before being passed to your callback. The 
load()
method uses the type
“html”, 
jQuery.getScript()
uses the type “script”, and 
jQuery.getJSON()
uses the type
“json”. 
jQuery.get()
and 
jQuery.post()
are more flexible than those special-purpose
utilities, however, and you can specify any of these types. The legal values for this
argument, as well as jQuery’s behavior when you omit the argument, are explained in
the sidebar.
jQuery’s Ajax Data Types
You can pass any of the following six types as an argument to 
jQuery.get()
or
jQuery.post()
. Additionally, as we’ll see below, you can pass one of these types to
jQuery.ajax()
using the 
dataType
option:
"text"
Returns the server’s response as plain text with no processing.
"html"
This type works just like “text”: the response is plain text. The 
load()
method uses
this type and inserts the returned text into the document itself.
"xml"
The URL is assumed to refer to XML-formatted data, and jQuery uses the
responseXML
property of the XMLHttpRequest object instead of the 
responseText
19.6  Ajax with jQuery | 563
Client-Side
JavaScript
Add a link to a pdf file - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf reader link; add link to pdf file
Add a link to a pdf file - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding hyperlinks to a pdf; adding links to pdf
property. The value passed to the callback is a Document object representing the
XML document instead of a string holding the document text.
"script"
The URL is assumed to reference a file of JavaScript, and the returned text is exe-
cuted as a script before being passed to the callback. 
jQuery.getScript()
uses this
type. When the type is “script”, jQuery can handle cross-domain requests using a
<script>
element instead of an XMLHttpRequest object.
"json"
The URL is assumed to reference a file of JSON-formatted data. The value passed
to the callback is the object obtained by parsing the URL contents with
jQuery.parseJSON()
(§19.7). 
jQuery.getJSON()
uses this type. If the type is “json”
and the URL or data string contains 
"=?"
, the type is converted to “jsonp”.
"jsonp"
The URL is assumed to refer to a server-side script that supports the JSONP pro-
tocol for passing JSON-formatted data as an argument to a client-specified func-
tion. (See §18.2 for more on JSONP.) This type passes the parsed object to the
callback function. Because JSONP requests can be made with 
<script>
elements,
this type can be used to make cross-domain requests, like the “script” type can.
When you use this type, your URL or data string should typically include a pa-
rameter like 
"&jsonp=?"
or 
"&callback=?"
. jQuery will replace the question mark
with the name of an automatically generated callback function. (But see the
jsonp
and 
jsonpCallback
options in §19.6.3.3 for alternatives.)
If you do not specify one of these types when you invoke a 
jQuery.get()
,
jQuery.post()
, or 
jQuery.ajax()
, jQuery examines the Content-Type header of the
HTTP response. If that header includes the string “xml”, an XML document is passed
to the callback. Otherwise, if the header includes the string “json”, the data is parsed
as JSON and the parsed object is passed to the callback. Otherwise, if the header in-
cludes the string “javascript”, the data is executed as a script. Otherwise, the data is
treated as plain text.
19.6.3  The jQuery.ajax() Function
All of jQuery’s Ajax utilities end up invoking 
jQuery.ajax()
—the most complicated
function in the entire library. 
jQuery.ajax()
accepts just a single argument: an options
object whose properties specify many details about how the Ajax request is to be per-
formed. A call to 
jQuery.getScript(url,callback)
, for example, is equivalent to this
jQuery.ajax()
invocation:
jQuery.ajax({
type: "GET",          // The HTTP request method.
url: url,             // The URL of the data to fetch.
data: null,           // Don't add any data to the URL.
dataType: "script",   // Execute the response as a script once we get it.
success: callback     // Call this function when done.
});
564 | Chapter 19: The jQuery Library
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update, and delete PDF file metadata, like
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; pdf link
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
pdf links; add link to pdf acrobat
You can set these five fundamental options with 
jQuery.get()
and 
jQuery.post()
.
jQuery.ajax()
supports quite a few other options, however, if you invoke it directly.
The options (including the basic five shown above) are explained in detail below.
Before we dive into the options, note that you can set defaults for any of these options
by passing an options object to 
jQuery.ajaxSetup()
:
jQuery.ajaxSetup({
timeout: 2000, // Abort all Ajax requests after 2 seconds
cache: false   // Defeat browser cache by adding a timestamp to the URL
});
After running the code above, the specified 
timeout
and 
cache
options will be used for
all Ajax requests (including high-level ones like 
jQuery.get()
and the 
load()
method)
that do not specify their own values for these options.
While reading about jQuery’s many options and callbacks in the sections that follow,
you may find it helpful to refer to the sidebars about jQuery’s Ajax status code and data
type strings in §19.6.1 and §19.6.2.3.
Ajax in jQuery 1.5
jQuery 1.5, which was released as this book was going to press, features a rewritten
Ajax module, with several convenient new features. The most important is that
jQuery.ajax()
and all of the Ajax utility functions described earlier now return a jqXHR
object. This object simulates the XMLHttpRequest API, even for requests (like those
made with 
$.getScript()
) that do not use an XMLHttpRequest object. Furthermore,
the jqXHR object defines 
success()
error()
methods that you can use to register call-
back functions to be invoked when the request succeeds or fails. So instead of passing
a callback to 
jQuery.get()
, for example, you might instead pass it to the 
success()
method of the jqXHR object returned by that utility function:
jQuery.get("data.txt")
.success(function(data) { console.log("Got", data); })
.success(function(data) { process(data); });
19.6.3.1  Common Options
The most commonly used 
jQuery.ajax()
options are the following:
type
Specifies the HTTP request method. The default is “GET”. “POST” is another
commonly used value. You can specify other HTTP request methods, such as
“DELETE” and “PUT”, but not all browsers support them. Note that this option
is misleadingly named: it has nothing to do with the data type of the request or
response, and “method” would be a better name.
19.6  Ajax with jQuery | 565
Client-Side
JavaScript
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
pdf hyperlinks; pdf reader link
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
add link to pdf file; add a link to a pdf in acrobat
url
The URL to be fetched. For GET requests, the 
data
option will be appended to this
URL. jQuery may add parameters to the URL for JSONP requests and when the
cache
option is 
false
.
data
Data to be appended to the URL (for GET requests) or sent in the body of the
request (for POST requests). This can be a string or an object. Objects are usually
converted to strings as described in the sidebar of §19.6.2.2, but see the 
process
Data
option for an exception.
dataType
Specifies the type of data expected in the response, and the way that that data
should be processed by jQuery. Legal values are “text”, “html”, “script”, “json”,
“jsonp”, and “xml”. The meanings of these values were explained in the sidebar
in §19.6.2.3. This option has no default value. When left unspecified, jQuery ex-
amines the 
Content-Type
header of the response to determine what to do with the
returned data.
contentType
Specifies the HTTP 
Content-Type
header for the request. The default is “applica-
tion/x-www-form-urlencoded”, which is the normal value used by HTML forms
and most server-side scripts. If you have set 
type
to “POST” and want to send plain
text or an XML document as the request body, you also need to set this option.
timeout
A timeout, in milliseconds. If this option is set and the request has not completed
within the specified timeout, the request will be aborted and the 
error
callback
will be called with status “timeout”. The default timeout is 0, which means that
requests continue until they complete and are never aborted.
cache
For GET requests, if this option is set to 
false
, jQuery will add a 
_=
parameter to
the URL or replace an existing parameter with that name. The value of this pa-
rameter is set to the current time (in millisecond format). This defeats browser-
based caching, since the URL will be different each time the request is made.
ifModified
When this option is set to 
true
, jQuery records the values of the 
Last-Modified
and
If-None-Match
response headers for each URL it requests and then sets those head-
ers in any subsequent requests for the same URL. This instructs the server to send
an HTTP 304 “Not Modified” response if the URL has not changed since the last
time it was requested. By default, this option is unset and jQuery does not set or
record these headers.
jQuery translates an HTTP 304 response to the status code “notmodified”. The
“notmodified” status is not considered an error, and this value is passed to the
success
callback instead of the normal “success” status code. Thus, if you set
the 
ifModified
option, you must check the status code in your callback—if the
566 | Chapter 19: The jQuery Library
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Have a try with this sample C#.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file.
add a link to a pdf file; add hyperlink pdf file
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Have a try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file. ' Open a document.
pdf hyperlink; add links to pdf online
status is “notmodified”, the first argument (the response data) will be undefined.
Note that in versions of jQuery before 1.4, a HTTP 304 code was considered an
error and the “notmodified” status code was passed to the error callback instead
of the success callback. See the sidebar in §19.6.1 for more on jQuery’s Ajax status
codes.
global
This option specifies whether jQuery should trigger events that describe the pro-
gress of the Ajax request. The default is 
true
; set this option to 
false
to disable all
Ajax-related events. (See §19.6.4 for full event details.) The name of this option is
confusing: it is named “global” because jQuery normally triggers its events globally
rather than on a specific object.
19.6.3.2  Callbacks
The following options specify functions to be invoked at various stages during the Ajax
request. The 
success
option is already familiar: it is the callback function that you pass
to methods like 
jQuery.getJSON()
. Note that jQuery also sends notification about the
progress of an Ajax request as events (unless you have set the 
global
option to 
false
) .
context
This option specifies the object to be used as the context—the 
this
value—for
invocations of the various callback functions. This option has no default value, and
if left unset, callbacks are invoked on the options object that holds them. Setting
the 
context
option also affects the way Ajax events are triggered (see §19.6.4). If
you set it, the value should be a Window, Document, or Element on which events
can be triggered.
beforeSend
This option specifies a callback function that will be invoked before the Ajax re-
quest is sent to the server. The first argument is the XMLHttpRequest object and
the second argument is the options object for the request. The 
beforeSend
callback
gives  programs  the  opportunity  to  set  custom  HTTP  headers  on  the
XMLHttpRequest
object. If this callback function returns 
false
, the Ajax request will
be aborted. Note that cross-domain “script” and “jsonp” requests do not use an
XMLHttpRequest object and do not trigger the 
beforeSend
callback.
success
This option specifies the callback function to be invoked when an Ajax request
completes successfully. The first argument is the data sent by the server. The second
argument is the jQuery status code, and the third argument is the XMLHttpRequest
object that was used to make the request. As explained in §19.6.2.3, the type of
the first argument depends on the 
dataType
option or on the 
Content-Type
header
of the server’s response. If the type is “xml”, the first argument is a Document
object. If the type is “json” or “jsonp”, the first argument is the object that results
from parsing the server’s JSON-formatted response. If the type was “script”, the
response is the text of the loaded script (that script will already have been executed,
19.6  Ajax with jQuery | 567
Client-Side
JavaScript
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
accessible links in pdf; add url to pdf
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Add necessary references: using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Note: When you get the error "Could not load file or assembly 'RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic' or any other
clickable links in pdf; add links to pdf in preview
however, so the response can usually be ignored in this case). For other types, the
response is simply the text of the requested resource.
The second argument status code is normally the string “success”, but if you have
set the 
ifModified
option, this argument might be “notmodified” instead. In this
case, the server does not send a response and the first argument is undefined. Cross-
domain requests of type “script” and “jsonp” are performed with a 
<script>
ele-
ment instead of an XMLHttpRequest, so for those requests, the third argument
will be undefined.
error
This option specifies the callback function to be invoked if the Ajax request does
not succeed. The first argument to this callback is the XMLHttpRequest object of
the request (if it used one). The second argument is the jQuery status code. This
may be “error” for an HTTP error, “timeout” for a timeout, and “parsererror” for
an error that occurred while parsing the server’s response. If an XML document or
JSON object is not well-formed, for example, the status code will be “parsererror”.
In this case, the third argument to the 
error
callback will be the Error object that
was thrown. Note that requests with 
dataType
“script” that return invalid Java-
Script code do not cause errors. Any errors in the script are silently ignored, and
the 
success
callback is invoked instead of the 
error
callback.
complete
This option specifies a callback function to be invoked when the Ajax request is
complete. Every Ajax request either succeeds and calls the 
success
callback or fails
and calls the 
error
callback. jQuery invokes the 
complete
callback after invoking
either 
success
or 
error
. The first argument to the 
complete
callback is the
XMLHttpRequest object, and the second is the status code.
19.6.3.3  Uncommon options and hooks
The following Ajax options are not commonly used. Some specify options that you are
not likely to set and others provide customization hooks for those who need to modify
jQuery’s default handling of Ajax requests.
async
Scripted  HTTP  requests  are  asynchronous  by  their  very  nature.  The
XMLHttpRequest object provides an option to block until the response is received,
however. Set this option to 
false
if you want jQuery to block. Setting this option
does not change the return value of 
jQuery.ajax()
: the function always returns the
XMLHttpRequest object, if it used one. For synchronous requests, you can extract
the server’s response and HTTP status code from the XMLHttpRequest object
yourself, or you can specify a 
complete
callback (as you would for an asynchronous
request) if you want jQuery’s parsed response and status code.
dataFilter
This option specifies a function to filter or preprocess the data returned by the
server. The first argument will be the raw data from the server (either as a string or
568 | Chapter 19: The jQuery Library
Document object for XML requests) and the second argument will be the value of
the 
dataType
option. If this function is specified, it must return a value, and that
value will be used in place of the server’s response. Note that the 
dataFilter
func-
tion is invoked before JSON parsing or script execution is performed. Also note
that 
dataFilter
is not invoked for cross-origin “script” and “jsonp” requests.
jsonp
When you set the 
dataType
option to “jsonp”, your 
url
or 
data
option usually
includes a parameter like “jsonp=?”. If jQuery does not find such a parameter in
the URL or data, it inserts one, using this option as the parameter name. The default
value of this option is “callback”. Set this option if you are using JSONP with a
server that expects a different parameter name and have not already encoded that
parameter into your URL or data. See §18.2 for more about JSONP.
jsonpCallback
For requests with 
dataType
“jsonp” (or type “json” when the URL includes a JSONP
parameter like “jsonp=?”), jQuery must alter the URL to replace the question mark
with the name of the wrapper function that the server will pass its data to. Nor-
mally, jQuery synthesizes a unique function name based on the current time. Set
this option if you want to substitute your own function for jQuery’s. If you do this,
however, it will prevent jQuery from invoking the 
success
and 
complete
callbacks
and from triggering its normal events.
processData
When you set the 
data
option to an object (or pass an object as the second argument
to 
jQuery.get()
and related methods), jQuery normally converts that object to a
string in the standard HTML “application/x-www-form-urlencoded” format (see
the sidebar in §19.6.2.2). If you want to avoid this step (such as when you want to
pass a Document object as the body of a POST request), set this option to 
false
.
scriptCharset
For cross-origin “script” and “jsonp” requests that use a 
<script>
element, this
option specifies the value of the 
charset
attribute of that element. It has no effect
for regular XMLHttpRequest-based requests.
traditional
jQuery 1.4 altered slightly the way that data objects were serialized to “application/
x-www-form-urlencoded” strings (see the sidebar in §19.6.2.2 for details). Set this
option to 
true
if you need jQuery to revert to its old behavior.
username
password
If a request requires password-based authentication, specify the username and
password using these two options.
xhr
This option specifies a factory function for obtaining an XMLHttpRequest. It is
invoked with no arguments and must return an object that implements the
XMLHttpRequest API. This very low-level hook allows you create your own wrap-
per around XMLHttpRequest, adding features or instrumentation to its methods.
19.6  Ajax with jQuery | 569
Client-Side
JavaScript
19.6.4  Ajax Events
§19.6.3.2 explained that 
jQuery.ajax()
has four callback options: 
beforeSend
success
,
error
, and 
complete
. In addition to invoking these individually specified callback func-
tions, jQuery’s Ajax functions also fire custom events at each of the same stages in a
Ajax request. The following table shows the callback options and the corresponding
events:
Callback
Event Type
Handler Registration Method
beforeSend
“ajaxSend”
ajaxSend()
success
“ajaxSuccess”
ajaxSuccess()
error
“ajaxError”
ajaxError()
complete
“ajaxComplete”
ajaxComplete()
“ajaxStart”
ajaxStart()
“ajaxStop”
ajaxStop()
You can register handlers for these custom Ajax events using the 
bind()
method
(§19.4.4) and the event type string shown in the second column or using the event
registration methods shown in the third column. 
ajaxSuccess()
and the other methods
work just like the 
click()
mouseover()
, and other simple event registration methods
of §19.4.1.
Since the Ajax events are custom events, generated by jQuery rather than the browser,
the Event object passed to the event handler does not contain much useful detail. The
ajaxSend, ajaxSuccess, ajaxError, and ajaxComplete events are all triggered with ad-
ditional arguments, however. Handlers for these events will all be invoked with two
extra arguments after the event. The first extra argument is the XMLHttpRequest object
and the second extra argument is the options object. This means, for example, that a
handler for the ajaxSend event can add custom headers to an XMLHttpRequest object
just like the 
beforeSend
callback can. The ajaxError event is triggered with a third extra
argument, in addition to the two just described. This final argument to the event han-
dler is the Error object, if any, that was thrown when the error occurred. Surprisingly,
these Ajax events are not passed jQuery’s status code. If the handler for an ajaxSuccess
event needs to distinguish “success” from “notmodified”, for example, it will need to
examine the raw HTTP status code in the XMLHttpRequest object.
The last two events listed in the table above are different from the others, most obviously
because they have no corresponding callback functions, and also because they are trig-
gered with no extra arguments. ajaxStart and ajaxStop are a pair of events that indicate
the start and stop of Ajax-related network activity. When jQuery is not performing any
Ajax requests and a new request is initiated, it fires an ajaxStart event. If other requests
begin before this first one ends, those new requests do not cause a new ajaxStart event.
The ajaxStop event is triggered when the last pending Ajax request is completed and
jQuery is no longer performing any network activity. This pair of events can be useful
570 | Chapter 19: The jQuery Library
to show and hide some kind of “Loading...” animation or network activity icon. For
example:
$("#loading_animation").bind({
ajaxStart: function() { $(this).show(); },
ajaxStop: function() { $(this).hide(); }
});
These ajaxStart and ajaxStop event handlers can be bound to any document element:
jQuery triggers them globally (§19.4.6) rather than on any one particular element. The
other four Ajax events, ajaxSend, ajaxSuccess, ajaxError, and ajaxComplete, are also
normally triggered globally, so you can bind handlers to any element. If you set the
context
option in your call to 
jQuery.ajax()
, however, these four events are triggered
on the context element rather than globally.
Finally, remember that you can prevent jQuery from triggering any Ajax-related events
by setting the 
global
option to 
false
. Despite its confusing name, setting 
global
to
false
stops jQuery from triggering events on a 
context
object as well as stopping jQuery
from triggering events globally.
19.7  Utility Functions
The jQuery library defines a number of utility functions (as well as two properties) that
you may find useful in your programs. As you’ll see in the list below, a number of these
functions now have equivalents in ECMAScript 5 (ES5). jQuery’s functions predate
ES5 and work in all browsers. In alphabetical order, the utility functions are:
jQuery.browser
The 
browser
property is not a function but an object that you can use for client
sniffing (§13.4.5). This object will have the property 
msie
set to 
true
if the browser
is IE. The 
mozilla
property will be true if the browser is Firefox or related. The
webkit
property will be true for Safari and Chrome, and the 
opera
property will be
true for Opera. In addition to this browser-specific property, the 
version
property
contains the browser version number. Client sniffing is best avoided whenever
possible, but you can use this property to work around browser-specific bugs with
code like this:
if ($.browser.mozilla && parseInt($.browser.version) < 4) {
// Work around a hypothetical Firefox bug here...
}
jQuery.contains()
This function expects two document elements as its arguments. It returns 
true
if
the first element contains the second element and returns 
false
otherwise.
jQuery.each()
Unlike the 
each()
method which iterates only  over jQuery objects, the
jQuery.each()
utility function iterates through the elements of an array or the
properties of an object. The first argument is the array or object to be iterated.
19.7  Utility Functions | 571
Client-Side
JavaScript
The second argument is the function to be called for each array element or object
property. That function will be invoked with two arguments: the index or name of
the array element or object property, and the value of the array element or object
property. The 
this
value for the function is the same as the second argument. If
the function returns 
false
jQuery.each()
returns immediately without completing
the iteration. 
jQuery.each()
always returns its first argument.
jQuery.each()
enumerates object properties with an ordinary 
for/in
loop, so all
enumerable properties are iterated, even inherited properties. 
jQuery.each()
enu-
merates array elements in numerical order by index and does not skip the undefined
properties of sparse arrays.
jQuery.extend()
This function expects objects as its arguments. It copies the properties of the second
and subsequent objects into the first object, overwriting any properties with the
same name in the first argument. This function skips any properties whose value
is 
undefined
or 
null
. If only one object is passed, the properties of that object are
copied into the 
jQuery
object itself. The return value is the object into which prop-
erties were copied. If the first argument is the value 
true
, a deep or recursive copy
is performed: the second argument is extended with the properties of the third (and
any subsequent) objects.
This function is useful for cloning objects and for merging options objects with
sets of defaults:
var clone = jQuery.extend({}, original);
var options = jQuery.extend({}, default_options, user_options);
jQuery.globalEval()
This function executes a string of JavaScript code in the global context, as if it were
the contents of a 
<script>
element. (In fact, jQuery actually implements this func-
tion by creating a 
<script>
element and temporarily inserting it into the document.)
jQuery.grep()
This function is like the ES5 
filter()
method of the Array object. It expects an
array as its first argument and a predicate function as its second, and it invokes the
predicate once for each element in the array, passing the element value and the
element index. 
jQuery.grep()
returns a new array that contains only those elements
of the argument array for which the predicate returned 
true
(or another truthy
value). If you pass 
true
as the third argument to 
jQuery.grep()
, it inverts the sense
of the predicate and returns an array of elements for which the predicate returned
false
or another falsy value.
jQuery.inArray()
This function is like the ES5 
indexOf()
method of the Array object. It expects an
arbitrary value as its first argument and an array (or array-like object) as its second
and returns the first index in the array at which the value appears, or -1 if the array
does not contain the value.
572 | Chapter 19: The jQuery Library
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested