open pdf and draw c# : Add url pdf SDK Library project winforms .net html UWP %5BO%60Reilly%5D%20-%20JavaScript.%20The%20Definitive%20Guide,%206th%20ed.%20-%20%5BFlanagan%5D6-part1592

When first created, the global object defines all of JavaScript’s predefined global values.
But this special object also holds program-defined globals as well. If your code declares
a global variable, that variable is a property of the global object. §3.10.2 explains this
in more detail.
3.6  Wrapper Objects
JavaScript objects are composite values: they are a collection of properties or named
values. We refer to the value of a property using the 
.
notation. When the value of a
property is a function, we call it a method. To invoke the method 
m
of an object 
o
, we
write 
o.m()
.
We’ve also seen that strings have properties and methods:
var s = "hello world!";                             // A string
var word = s.substring(s.indexOf(" ")+1, s.length); // Use string properties
Strings are not objects, though, so why do they have properties? Whenever you try to
refer to a property of a string 
s
, JavaScript converts the string value to an object as if by
calling 
new String(s)
. This object inherits (see §6.2.2) string methods and is used to
resolve the property reference. Once the property has been resolved, the newly created
object is discarded. (Implementations are not required to actually create and discard
this transient object: they must behave as if they do, however.)
Numbers and booleans have methods for the same reason that strings do: a temporary
object is created using the 
Number()
or 
Boolean()
constructor, and the method is re-
solved using that temporary object. There are not wrapper objects for the 
null
and
undefined
values: any attempt to access a property of one of these values causes a
TypeError
.
Consider the following code and think about what happens when it is executed:
var s = "test";         // Start with a string value.
s.len = 4;              // Set a property on it.
var t = s.len;          // Now query the property.
When you run this code, the value of 
t
is 
undefined
. The second line of code creates a
temporary String object, sets its 
len
property to 4, and then discards that object. The
third line creates a new String object from the original (unmodified) string value and
then tries to read the 
len
property. This property does not exist, and the expression
evaluates to 
undefined
. This code demonstrates that strings, numbers, and boolean
values behave like objects when you try to read the value of a property (or method)
from them. But if you attempt to set the value of a property, that attempt is silently
ignored: the change is made on a temporary object and does not persist.
The temporary objects created when you access a property of a string, number, or
boolean are known as wrapper objects, and it may occasionally be necessary to distin-
guish a string value from a String object or a number or boolean value from a Number
or Boolean object. Usually, however,  wrapper  objects can be considered an
3.6  Wrapper Objects | 43
Core JavaScript
Add url pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding links to pdf in preview; adding an email link to a pdf
Add url pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
change link in pdf; add links to pdf in acrobat
implementation detail and you don’t have to think about them. You just need to know
that string, number, and boolean values differ from objects in that their properties are
read-only and that you can’t define new properties on them.
Note that it is possible (but almost never necessary or useful) to explicitly create wrap-
per objects, by invoking the 
String()
Number()
, or 
Boolean()
constructors:
var s = "test", n = 1, b = true;  // A string, number, and boolean value.
var S = new String(s);            // A String object
var N = new Number(n);            // A Number object
var B = new Boolean(b);           // A Boolean object
JavaScript converts wrapper objects into the wrapped primitive value as necessary, so
the objects 
S
N
, and 
B
above usually, but not always, behave just like the values 
s
n
,
and 
b
. The 
==
equality operator treats a value and its wrapper object as equal, but you
can distinguish them with the 
===
strict equality operator. The 
typeof
operator will also
show you the difference between a primitive value and its wrapper object.
3.7  Immutable Primitive Values and Mutable Object
References
There is a fundamental difference in JavaScript between primitive values (
undefined
,
null
, booleans, numbers, and strings) and objects (including arrays and functions).
Primitives are immutable: there is no way to change (or “mutate”) a primitive value.
This is obvious for numbers and booleans—it doesn’t even make sense to change the
value of a number. It is not so obvious for strings, however. Since strings are like arrays
of characters, you might expect to be able to alter the character at any specified index.
In fact, JavaScript does not allow this, and all string methods that appear to return a
modified string are, in fact, returning a new string value. For example:
var s = "hello";   // Start with some lowercase text
s.toUpperCase();   // Returns "HELLO", but doesn't alter s
                 // => "hello": the original string has not changed
Primitives are also compared by value: two values are the same only if they have the
same value. This sounds circular for numbers, booleans, 
null
, and 
undefined
: there is
no other way that they could be compared. Again, however, it is not so obvious for
strings. If two distinct string values are compared, JavaScript treats them as equal if,
and only if, they have the same length and if the character at each index is the same.
Objects are different than primitives. First, they are mutable—their values can change:
var o = { x:1 };     // Start with an object
o.x = 2;             // Mutate it by changing the value of a property
o.y = 3;             // Mutate it again by adding a new property
var a = [1,2,3]      // Arrays are also mutable
a[0] = 0;            // Change the value of an array element
a[3] = 4;            // Add a new array element
44 | Chapter 3: Types, Values, and Variables
C#: How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) in HTML5 Viewer
License and Price. File Formats. PDF. Word. Excel. PowerPoint. Tiff. DNN (Dotnetnuke). Quick to Start. Add a Viewer Control on Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP).
c# read pdf from url; adding hyperlinks to pdf
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
addTab(_tabRedact); //add Tab "Sample new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.addCSS( new customStyle({ background: "url('RasterEdge_Resource_Files/images
convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks; add a link to a pdf
Objects are not compared by value: two objects are not equal even if they have the same
properties and values. And two arrays are not equal even if they have the same elements
in the same order:
var o = {x:1}, p = {x:1};  // Two objects with the same properties
o === p                    // => false: distinct objects are never equal
var a = [], b = [];        // Two distinct, empty arrays
a === b                    // => false: distinct arrays are never equal
Objects are sometimes called reference types to distinguish them from JavaScript’s
primitive types. Using this terminology, object values are references, and we say that
objects are compared by reference: two object values are the same if and only if they
refer to the same underlying object.
var a = [];   // The variable a refers to an empty array.
var b = a;    // Now b refers to the same array.
b[0] = 1;     // Mutate the array referred to by variable b.
a[0]          // => 1: the change is also visible through variable a.
a === b       // => true: a and b refer to the same object, so they are equal.
As you can see from the code above, assigning an object (or array) to a variable simply
assigns the reference: it does not create a new copy of the object. If you want to make
a new copy of an object or array, you must explicitly copy the properties of the object
or the elements of the array. This example demonstrates using a 
for
loop (§5.5.3):
var a = ['a','b','c'];              // An array we want to copy
var b = [];                         // A distinct array we'll copy into
for(var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) { // For each index of a[]
b[i] = a[i];                    // Copy an element of a into b
}
Similarly, if we want to compare two distinct objects or arrays, we must compare their
properties or elements. This code defines a function to compare two arrays:
function equalArrays(a,b) {
if (a.length != b.length) return false; // Different-size arrays not equal
for(var i = 0; i < a.length; i++)       // Loop through all elements
if (a[i] !== b[i]) return false;    // If any differ, arrays not equal
return true;                            // Otherwise they are equal
}
3.8  Type Conversions
JavaScript is very flexible about the types of values it requires. We’ve seen this for
booleans: when JavaScript expects a boolean value, you may supply a value of any type,
and JavaScript will convert it as needed. Some values (“truthy” values) convert to
true
and others (“falsy” values) convert to 
false
. The same is true for other types: if
JavaScript wants a string, it will convert whatever value you give it to a string. If Java-
Script wants a number, it will try to convert the value you give it to a number (or to
NaN
if it cannot perform a meaningful conversion). Some examples:
10 + " objects"     // => "10 objects".  Number 10 converts to a string
"7" * "4"           // => 28: both strings convert to numbers
3.8  Type Conversions | 45
Core JavaScript
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
clickable links in pdf from word; add page number to pdf hyperlink
C# Image: How to Download Image from URL in C# Project with .NET
Add this imaging library to your C#.NET project jpeg / jpg, or bmp image from a URL to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
adding a link to a pdf; add links to pdf file
var n = 1 - "x";    // => NaN: string "x" can't convert to a number
n + " objects"      // => "NaN objects": NaN converts to string "NaN"
Table 3-2 summarizes how values convert from one type to another in JavaScript. Bold
entries in the table highlight conversions that you may find surprising. Empty cells
indicate that no conversion is necessary and none is performed.
Table 3-2. JavaScript type conversions
Value
Converted to:
String
Number
Boolean Object
undefined
"undefined"
NaN
false
throws TypeError
null
"null"
0
false
throws TypeError
true
"true"
1
new Boolean(true)
false
"false"
0
new Boolean(false)
""
(empty string)
0
false
new String("")
"1.2"
(nonempty, numeric)
1.2
true
new String("1.2")
"one"
(nonempty, non-numeric)
NaN
true
new String("one")
0
"0"
false
new Number(0)
-0
"0"
false
new Number(-0)
NaN
"NaN"
false
new Number(NaN)
Infinity
"Infinity"
true
new Number(Infinity)
-Infinity
"-Infinity"
true
new Number(-Infinity)
1
(finite, non-zero)
"1"
true
new Number(1)
{}
(any object)
see §3.8.3
see §3.8.3
true
[]
(empty array)
""
0
true
[9]
(1 numeric elt)
"9"
9
true
['a']
(any other array)
use join() method
NaN
true
function(){}
(any function)
see §3.8.3
NaN
true
The  primitive-to-primitive  conversions  shown  in  the  table  are  relatively
straightforward. Conversion to boolean was already discussed in §3.3. Conversion to
strings is well-defined for all primitive values. Conversion to numbers is just a little
trickier. Strings that can be parsed as numbers convert to those numbers. Leading and
trailing spaces are allowed, but any leading or trailing nonspace characters that are not
part of a numeric literal cause the string-to-number conversion to produce 
NaN
. Some
numeric conversions may seem surprising: 
true
converts to 1, and 
false
and the empty
string 
""
convert to 0.
Primitive-to-object conversions are straightforward: primitive values convert to their
wrapper object (§3.6) as if by calling the 
String()
Number()
, or 
Boolean()
constructor.
46 | Chapter 3: Types, Values, and Variables
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
check links in pdf; add links to pdf acrobat
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
add links to pdf in acrobat; pdf reader link
The exceptions are 
null
and 
undefined
: any attempt to use these values where an object
is expected raises a TypeError exception rather than performing a conversion.
Object-to-primitive conversion is somewhat more complicated, and it is the subject of
§3.8.3.
3.8.1  Conversions and Equality
Because JavaScript can convert values flexibly, its 
==
equality operator is also flexible
with its notion of equality. All of the following comparisons are true, for example:
null == undefined // These two values are treated as equal.
"0" == 0          // String converts to a number before comparing.
0 == false        // Boolean converts to number before comparing.
"0" == false      // Both operands convert to numbers before comparing.
§4.9.1 explains exactly what conversions are performed by the 
==
operator in order to
determine whether two values should be considered equal, and it also describes the
strict equality operator 
===
that does not perform conversions when testing for equality.
Keep in mind that convertibility of one value to another does not imply equality of
those two values. If 
undefined
is used where a boolean value is expected, for example,
it will convert to 
false
. But this does not mean that 
undefined == false
. JavaScript
operators and statements expect values of various types, and perform conversions to
those types. The 
if
statement converts 
undefined
to 
false
, but the 
==
operator never
attempts to convert its operands to booleans.
3.8.2  Explicit Conversions
Although JavaScript performs many type conversions automatically, you may some-
times need to perform an explicit conversion, or you may prefer to make the conversions
explicit to keep your code clearer.
The simplest way to perform an explicit type conversion is to use the 
Boolean()
,
Number()
String()
, or 
Object()
functions. We’ve already seen these functions as con-
structors for wrapper objects (in §3.6). When invoked without the 
new
operator, how-
ever, they work as conversion functions and perform the conversions summarized in
Table 3-2:
Number("3")           // => 3
String(false)         // => "false"  Or use false.toString()
Boolean([])           // => true
Object(3)             // => new Number(3)
Note that any value other than 
null
or 
undefined
has a 
toString()
method and the
result of this method is usually the same as that returned by the 
String()
function. Also
note that Table 3-2 shows a TypeError if you attempt to convert 
null
or 
undefined
to
an object. The 
Object()
function does not throw an exception in this case: instead it
simply returns a newly created empty object.
3.8  Type Conversions | 47
Core JavaScript
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
add url pdf; add hyperlink to pdf online
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Download and Save Image from Web URL
Apart from image downloading from web URL, RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK still dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
adding a link to a pdf; add links in pdf
Certain JavaScript operators perform implicit type conversions, and are sometimes
used for the purposes of type conversion. If one operand of the 
+
operator is a string,
it converts the other one to a string. The unary 
+
operator converts its operand to a
number. And the unary 
!
operator converts its operand to a boolean and negates it.
These facts lead to the following type conversion idioms that you may see in some code:
x + ""           // Same as String(x)
+x               // Same as Number(x).  You may also see x-0
!!x              // Same as Boolean(x). Note double !
Formatting and parsing numbers are common tasks in computer programs and Java-
Script has specialized functions and methods that provide more precise control over
number-to-string and string-to-number conversions.
The 
toString()
method defined by the Number class accepts an optional argument
that specifies a radix, or base, for the conversion. If you do not specify the argument,
the conversion is done in base 10. However, you can also convert numbers in other
bases (between 2 and 36). For example:
var n = 17;
binary_string = n.toString(2);        // Evaluates to "10001"
octal_string = "0" + n.toString(8);   // Evaluates to "021"
hex_string = "0x" + n.toString(16);   // Evaluates to "0x11"
When working with financial or scientific data, you may want to convert numbers to
strings in ways that give you control over the number of decimal places or the number
of significant digits in the output, or you may want to control whether exponential
notation is used. The Number class defines three methods for these kinds of number-
to-string conversions. 
toFixed()
converts a number to a string with a specified number
of digits after the decimal point. It never uses exponential notation. 
toExponential()
converts a number to a string using exponential notation, with one digit before the
decimal point and a specified number of digits after the decimal point (which means
that the number of significant digits is one larger than the value you specify). 
toPreci
sion()
converts a number to a string with the number of significant digits you specify.
It uses exponential notation if the number of significant digits is not large enough to
display the entire integer portion of the number. Note that all three methods round the
trailing digits or pad with zeros as appropriate. Consider the following examples:
var n = 123456.789;
n.toFixed(0);         // "123457"
n.toFixed(2);         // "123456.79"
n.toFixed(5);         // "123456.78900"
n.toExponential(1);   // "1.2e+5"
n.toExponential(3);   // "1.235e+5"
n.toPrecision(4);     // "1.235e+5"
n.toPrecision(7);     // "123456.8"
n.toPrecision(10);    // "123456.7890"
If you pass a string to the 
Number()
conversion function, it attempts to parse that string
as an integer or floating-point literal. That function only works for base-10 integers,
and does not allow trailing characters that are not part of the literal. The 
parseInt()
48 | Chapter 3: Types, Values, and Variables
and 
parseFloat()
functions (these are global functions, not methods of any class) are
more flexible. 
parseInt()
parses only integers, while 
parseFloat()
parses both integers
and floating-point numbers. If a string begins with “0x” or “0X”, 
parseInt()
interprets
it as a hexadecimal number.
2
Both 
parseInt()
and 
parseFloat()
skip leading white-
space, parse as many numeric characters as they can, and ignore anything that follows.
If the first nonspace character is not part of a valid numeric literal, they return NaN:
parseInt("3 blind mice")     // => 3
parseFloat(" 3.14 meters")   // => 3.14
parseInt("-12.34")           // => -12
parseInt("0xFF")             // => 255
parseInt("0xff")             // => 255
parseInt("-0XFF")            // => -255
parseFloat(".1")             // => 0.1
parseInt("0.1")              // => 0
parseInt(".1")               // => NaN: integers can't start with "."
parseFloat("$72.47");        // => NaN: numbers can't start with "$"
parseInt()
accepts an optional second argument specifying the radix (base) of the
number to be parsed. Legal values are between 2 and 36. For example:
parseInt("11", 2);           // => 3 (1*2 + 1)
parseInt("ff", 16);          // => 255 (15*16 + 15)
parseInt("zz", 36);          // => 1295 (35*36 + 35)
parseInt("077", 8);          // => 63 (7*8 + 7)
parseInt("077", 10);         // => 77 (7*10 + 7)
3.8.3  Object to Primitive Conversions
Object-to-boolean conversions are trivial: all objects (including arrays and functions)
convert to 
true
. This is so even for wrapper objects: 
new Boolean(false)
is an object
rather than a primitive value, and so it converts to 
true
.
Object-to-string and object-to-number conversions are performed by invoking a meth-
od of the object to be converted. This is complicated by the fact that JavaScript objects
have two different methods that perform conversions, and it is also complicated by
some special cases described below. Note that the string and number conversion rules
described here apply only to native objects. Host objects (defined by web browsers, for
example) can convert to numbers and strings according to their own algorithms.
All objects inherit two conversion methods. The first is called 
toString()
, and its job
is to return a string representation of the object. The default 
toString()
method does
not return a very interesting value (though we’ll find it useful in Example 6-4):
({x:1, y:2}).toString()    // => "[object Object]"
2.In ECMAScript 3, 
parseInt()
may parse a string that begins with “0” (but not “0x” or “0X”) as an octal
number or as a decimal number. Because the behavior is unspecified, you should never use 
parseInt()
to parse numbers with leading zeros, unless you explicitly specify the radix to be used! In ECMAScript 5,
parseInt()
only parses octal numbers if you explicitly pass 8 as the second argument.
3.8  Type Conversions | 49
Core JavaScript
Many classes define more specific versions of the 
toString()
method. The 
toString()
method of the Array class, for example, converts each array element to a string and
joins the resulting strings together with commas in between. The 
toString()
method
of the Function class returns an implementation-defined representation of a function.
In practice, implementations usually convert user-defined functions to strings of Java-
Script source code. The Date class defines a 
toString()
method that returns a human-
readable (and JavaScript-parsable) date and time string. The RegExp class defines a
toString()
method that converts RegExp objects to a string that looks like a RegExp
literal:
[1,2,3].toString()                  // => "1,2,3"
(function(x) { f(x); }).toString()  // => "function(x) {\n    f(x);\n}"
/\d+/g.toString()                   // => "/\\d+/g"
new Date(2010,0,1).toString()  // => "Fri Jan 01 2010 00:00:00 GMT-0800 (PST)"
The other object conversion function is called 
valueOf()
. The job of this method is less
well-defined: it is supposed to convert an object to a primitive value that represents the
object, if any such primitive value exists. Objects are compound values, and most ob-
jects cannot really be represented by a single primitive value, so the default 
valueOf()
method simply returns the object itself rather than returning a primitive. Wrapper
classes define 
valueOf()
methods that return the wrapped primitive value. Arrays,
functions, and regular expressions simply inherit the default method. Calling
valueOf()
for instances of these types simply returns the object itself. The Date class
defines a 
valueOf()
method that returns the date in its internal representation: the
number of milliseconds since January 1, 1970:
var d = new Date(2010, 0, 1);   // January 1st, 2010, (Pacific time)
d.valueOf()                     // => 1262332800000
With the 
toString()
and 
valueOf()
methods explained, we can now cover object-to-
string and object-to-number conversions. Do note, however, that there are some special
cases in which JavaScript performs a different object-to-primitive conversion. These
special cases are covered at the end of this section.
To convert an object to a string, JavaScript takes these steps:
• If the object has a 
toString()
method, JavaScript calls it. If it returns a primitive
value, JavaScript converts that value to a string (if it is not already a string) and
returns the result of that conversion. Note that primitive-to-string conversions are
all well-defined in Table 3-2.
• If the object has no 
toString()
method, or if that method does not return a primitive
value, then JavaScript looks for a 
valueOf()
method. If the method exists, Java-
Script calls it. If the return value is a primitive, JavaScript converts that value to a
string (if it is not already) and returns the converted value.
• Otherwise, JavaScript cannot obtain a primitive value from either 
toString()
or
valueOf()
, so it throws a TypeError.
50 | Chapter 3: Types, Values, and Variables
To convert an object to a number, JavaScript does the same thing, but it tries the
valueOf()
method first:
• If the object has a 
valueOf()
method that returns a primitive value, JavaScript con-
verts (if necessary) that primitive value to a number and returns the result.
• Otherwise, if the object has a 
toString()
method that returns a primitive value,
JavaScript converts and returns the value.
• Otherwise, JavaScript throws a TypeError.
The details of this object-to-number conversion explain why an empty array converts
to the number 0 and why an array with a single element may also convert to a number.
Arrays inherit the default 
valueOf()
method that returns an object rather than a prim-
itive value, so array-to-number conversion relies on the 
toString()
method. Empty
arrays convert to the empty string. And the empty string converts to the number 0. An
array with a single element converts to the same string that that one element does. If
an array contains a single number, that number is converted to a string, and then back
to a number.
The 
+
operator in JavaScript performs numeric addition and string concatenation. If
either of its operands is an object, JavaScript converts the object using a special object-
to-primitive conversion rather than the object-to-number conversion used by the other
arithmetic operators. The 
==
equality operator is similar. If asked to compare an object
with a primitive value, it converts the object using the object-to-primitive conversion.
The object-to-primitive conversion used by 
+
and 
==
includes a special case for Date
objects. The Date class is the only predefined core JavaScript type that defines mean-
ingful conversions to both strings and numbers. The object-to-primitive conversion is
basically an object-to-number conversion (
valueof()
first) for all objects that are not
dates, and an object-to-string conversion (
toString()
first) for Date objects. The con-
version is not exactly the same as those explained above, however: the primitive value
returned by 
valueOf()
or 
toString()
is used directly without being forced to a number
or string.
The 
<
operator and the other relational operators perform object-to-primitive conver-
sions like 
==
does, but without the special case for Date objects: any object is converted
by trying 
valueOf()
first and then 
toString()
. Whatever primitive value is obtained is
used directly, without being further converted to a number or string.
+
==
!=
and the relational operators are the only ones that perform this special kind of
string-to-primitive conversions. Other operators convert more explicitly to a specified
type and do not have any special case for Date objects. The 
-
operator, for example,
converts its operands to numbers. The following code demonstrates the behavior of
+
-
==
, and 
>
with Date objects:
var now = new Date();     // Create a Date object
typeof (now + 1)          // => "string": + converts dates to strings
typeof (now - 1)          // => "number": - uses object-to-number conversion
3.8  Type Conversions | 51
Core JavaScript
now == now.toString()     // => true: implicit and explicit string conversions
now > (now -1)            // => true: > converts a Date to a number
3.9  Variable Declaration
Before you use a variable in a JavaScript program, you should declare it. Variables are
declared with the 
var
keyword, like this:
var i;
var sum;
You can also declare multiple variables with the same 
var
keyword:
var i, sum;
And you can combine variable declaration with variable initialization:
var message = "hello";
var i = 0, j = 0, k = 0;
If you don’t specify an initial value for a variable with the 
var
statement, the variable
is declared, but its value is 
undefined
until your code stores a value into it.
Note that the 
var
statement can also appear as part of the 
for
and 
for/in
loops (intro-
duced in Chapter 5), allowing you to succinctly declare the loop variable as part of the
loop syntax itself. For example:
for(var i = 0; i < 10; i++) console.log(i);
for(var i = 0, j=10; i < 10; i++,j--) console.log(i*j);
for(var p in o) console.log(p);
If you’re used to statically typed languages such as C or Java, you will have noticed that
there is no type associated with JavaScript’s variable declarations. A JavaScript variable
can hold a value of any type. For example, it is perfectly legal in JavaScript to assign a
number to a variable and then later assign a string to that variable:
var i = 10;
i = "ten";
3.9.1  Repeated and Omitted Declarations
It is legal and harmless to declare a variable more than once with the 
var
statement. If
the repeated declaration has an initializer, it acts as if it were simply an assignment
statement.
If you attempt to read the value of an undeclared variable, JavaScript generates an error.
In ECMAScript 5 strict mode (§5.7.3), it is also an error to assign a value to an unde-
clared variable. Historically, however, and in non-strict mode, if you assign a value to
an undeclared variable, JavaScript actually creates that variable as a property of the
global object, and it works much like (but not exactly the same as, see §3.10.2) a prop-
erly declared global variable. This means that you can get away with leaving your global
variables undeclared. This is a bad habit and a source of bugs, however, and you should
always declare your variables with 
var
.
52 | Chapter 3: Types, Values, and Variables
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested