open pdf and draw c# : Add links in pdf SDK software project winforms wpf asp.net UWP %5BO%60Reilly%5D%20-%20JavaScript.%20The%20Definitive%20Guide,%206th%20ed.%20-%20%5BFlanagan%5D7-part1603

3.10  Variable Scope
The scope of a variable is the region of your program source code in which it is defined.
A global variable has global scope; it is defined everywhere in your JavaScript code. On
the other hand, variables declared within a function are defined only within the body
of the function. They are local variables and have local scope. Function parameters also
count as local variables and are defined only within the body of the function.
Within the body of a function, a local variable takes precedence over a global variable
with the same name. If you declare a local variable or function parameter with the same
name as a global variable, you effectively hide the global variable:
var scope = "global";         // Declare a global variable
function checkscope() {
var scope = "local";      // Declare a local variable with the same name
return scope;             // Return the local value, not the global one
}
checkscope()                  // => "local"
Although you can get away with not using the 
var
statement when you write code in
the global scope, you must always use 
var
to declare local variables. Consider what
happens if you don’t:
scope = "global";            // Declare a global variable, even without var.
function checkscope2() {
scope = "local";         // Oops! We just changed the global variable.
myscope = "local";       // This implicitly declares a new global variable.
return [scope, myscope]; // Return two values.
}
checkscope2()                // => ["local", "local"]: has side effects!
scope                        // => "local": global variable has changed.
myscope                      // => "local": global namespace cluttered up.
Function definitions can be nested. Each function has its own local scope, so it is pos-
sible to have several nested layers of local scope. For example:
var scope = "global scope";          // A global variable
function checkscope() {
var scope = "local scope";       // A local variable
function nested() {
var scope = "nested scope";  // A nested scope of local variables
return scope;                // Return the value in scope here
}
return nested();
}
checkscope()                         // => "nested scope"
3.10.1  Function Scope and Hoisting
In some C-like programming languages, each block of code within curly braces has its
own scope, and variables are not visible outside of the block in which they are declared.
This is called block scope, and JavaScript does not have it. Instead, JavaScript uses
3.10  Variable Scope | 53
Core JavaScript
Add links in pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink to pdf online; add links pdf document
Add links in pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
clickable links in pdf; add hyperlinks to pdf
function scope: variables are visible within the function in which they are defined and
within any functions that are nested within that function.
In the following code, the variables 
i
j
, and 
k
are declared in different spots, but all
have the same scope—all three are defined throughout the body of the function:
function test(o) {
var i = 0;                      // i is defined throughout function
if (typeof o == "object") {
var j = 0;                  // j is defined everywhere, not just block
for(var k=0; k < 10; k++) { // k is defined everywhere, not just loop
console.log(k);         // print numbers 0 through 9
}
console.log(k);             // k is still defined: prints 10
}
console.log(j);                 // j is defined, but may not be initialized
}
JavaScript’s function scope means that all variables declared within a function are visi-
ble throughout the body of the function. Curiously, this means that variables are even
visible before they are declared. This feature of JavaScript is informally known as hoist-
ing: JavaScript code behaves as if all variable declarations in a function (but not any
associated assignments) are “hoisted” to the top of the function. Consider the following
code:
var scope = "global";
function f() {
console.log(scope);  // Prints "undefined", not "global"
var scope = "local"; // Variable initialized here, but defined everywhere
console.log(scope);  // Prints "local"
}
You might think that the first line of the function would print “global”, because the
var
statement declaring the local variable has not yet been executed. Because of the
rules of function scope, however, this is not what happens. The local variable is defined
throughout the body of the function, which means the global variable by the same name
is hidden throughout the function. Although the local variable is defined throughout,
it is not actually initialized until the 
var
statement is executed. Thus, the function above
is equivalent to the following, in which the variable declaration is “hoisted” to the top
and the variable initialization is left where it is:
function f() {
var scope;          // Local variable is declared at the top of the function
console.log(scope); // It exists here, but still has "undefined" value
scope = "local";    // Now we initialize it and give it a value
console.log(scope); // And here it has the value we expect
}
In programming languages with block scope, it is generally good programming practice
to declare variables as close as possible to where they are used and with the narrowest
possible scope. Since JavaScript does not have block scope, some programmers make
a point of declaring all their variables at the top of the function, rather than trying to
54 | Chapter 3: Types, Values, and Variables
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
HTML converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to Add necessary references
clickable links in pdf files; change link in pdf
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
PDF Write. Insert text, text box into PDF. Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add, edit, delete links. Form Process
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; add url pdf
declare them closer to the point at which they are used. This technique makes their
source code accurately reflect the true scope of the variables.
3.10.2  Variables As Properties
When you declare a global JavaScript variable, what you are actually doing is defining
a property of the global object (§3.5). If you use 
var
to declare the variable, the property
that is created is nonconfigurable (see §6.7), which means that it cannot be deleted
with the 
delete
operator. We’ve already noted that if you’re not using strict mode and
you assign a value to an undeclared variable, JavaScript automatically creates a global
variable for you. Variables created in this way are regular, configurable properties of
the global object and they can be deleted:
var truevar = 1;     // A properly declared global variable, nondeletable.
fakevar = 2;         // Creates a deletable property of the global object.
this.fakevar2 = 3;   // This does the same thing.
delete truevar       // => false: variable not deleted
delete fakevar       // => true: variable deleted
delete this.fakevar2 // => true: variable deleted
JavaScript global variables are properties of the global object, and this is mandated by
the ECMAScript specification. There is no such requirement for local variables, but
you can imagine local variables as the properties of an object associated with each
function invocation. The ECMAScript 3 specification referred to this object as the “call
object,” and the ECMAScript 5 specification calls it a “declarative environment record.”
JavaScript allows us to refer to the global object with the 
this
keyword, but it does not
give us any way to refer to the object in which local variables are stored. The precise
nature of these objects that hold local variables is an implementation detail that need
not concern us. The notion that these local variable objects exist, however, is an im-
portant one, and it is developed further in the next section.
3.10.3  The Scope Chain
JavaScript is a lexically scoped language: the scope of a variable can be thought of as
the set of source code lines for which the variable is defined. Global variables are defined
throughout the program. Local variables are defined throughout the function in which
they are declared, and also within any functions nested within that function.
If we think of local variables as properties of some kind of implementation-defined
object, then there is another way to think about variable scope. Every chunk of Java-
Script code (global code or functions) has a scope chain associated with it. This scope
chain is a list or chain of objects that defines the variables that are “in scope” for that
code. When JavaScript needs to look up the value of a variable 
x
(a process called
variable resolution), it starts by looking at the first object in the chain. If that object has
a property named 
x
, the value of that property is used. If the first object does not have
a property named 
x
, JavaScript continues the search with the next object in the chain.
If the second object does not have a property named 
x
, the search moves on to the next
3.10  Variable Scope | 55
Core JavaScript
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
adding a link to a pdf; add links to pdf acrobat
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness). C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C# Add necessary references
add hyperlink pdf document; add link to pdf
object, and so on. If 
x
is not a property of any of the objects in the scope chain, then
x
is not in scope for that code, and a ReferenceError occurs.
In top-level JavaScript code (i.e., code not contained within any function definitions),
the scope chain consists of a single object, the global object. In a non-nested function,
the scope chain consists of two objects. The first is the object that defines the function’s
parameters and local variables, and the second is the global object. In a nested function,
the scope chain has three or more objects. It is important to understand how this chain
of objects is created. When a function is defined, it stores the scope chain then in effect.
When that function is invoked, it creates a new object to store its local variables, and
adds that new object to the stored scope chain to create a new, longer, chain that
represents the scope for that function invocation. This becomes more interesting for
nested functions because each time the outer function is called, the inner function is
defined again. Since the scope chain differs on each invocation of the outer function,
the inner function will be subtly different each time it is defined—the code of the inner
function will be identical on each invocation of the outer function, but the scope chain
associated with that code will be different.
This notion of a scope chain is helpful for understanding the 
with
statement (§5.7.1)
and is crucial for understanding closures (§8.6).
56 | Chapter 3: Types, Values, and Variables
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
pdf hyperlink; pdf edit hyperlink
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add links to pdf in preview; pdf email link
CHAPTER 4
Expressions and Operators
An expression is a phrase of JavaScript that a JavaScript interpreter can evaluate to
produce a value. A constant embedded literally in your program is a very simple kind
of expression. A variable name is also a simple expression that evaluates to whatever
value has been assigned to that variable. Complex expressions are built from simpler
expressions. An array access expression, for example, consists of one expression that
evaluates to an array followed by an open square bracket, an expression that evaluates
to an integer, and a close square bracket. This new, more complex expression evaluates
to the value stored at the specified index of the specified array. Similarly, a function
invocation expression consists of one expression that evaluates to a function object and
zero or more additional expressions that are used as the arguments to the function.
The most common way to build a complex expression out of simpler expressions is
with an operator. An operator combines the values of its operands (usually two of them)
in some way and evaluates to a new value. The multiplication operator 
*
is a simple
example. The expression 
x * y
evaluates to the product of the values of the expressions
x
and 
y
. For simplicity, we sometimes say that an operator returns a value rather than
“evaluates to” a value.
This chapter documents all of JavaScript’s operators, and it also explains expressions
(such as array indexing and function invocation) that do not use operators. If you al-
ready know another programming language that uses C-style syntax, you’ll find that
the syntax of most of JavaScript’s expressions and operators is already familiar to you.
4.1  Primary Expressions
The simplest expressions, known as primary expressions, are those that stand alone—
they do not include any simpler expressions. Primary expressions in JavaScript are
constant or literal values, certain language keywords, and variable references.
57
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
active links in pdf; pdf link
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Management Using C#.NET Imaging
more detailed C# tutorials on each part by following the links respectively are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf link to specific page; adding links to pdf in preview
Literals are constant values that are embedded directly in your program. They look like
these:
1.23         // A number literal
"hello"      // A string literal
/pattern/    // A regular expression literal
JavaScript syntax for number literals was covered in §3.1. String literals were docu-
mented in §3.2. The regular expression literal syntax was introduced in §3.2.4 and will
be documented in detail in Chapter 10.
Some of JavaScript’s reserved words are primary expressions:
true      // Evalutes to the boolean true value
false     // Evaluates to the boolean false value
null      // Evaluates to the null value
this      // Evaluates to the "current" object
We learned about 
true
false
, and 
null
in §3.3 and §3.4. Unlike the other keywords,
this
is not a constant—it evaluates to different values in different places in the program.
The 
this
keyword is used in object-oriented programming. Within the body of a meth-
od, 
this
evaluates to the object on which the method was invoked. See §4.5Chap-
ter 8 (especially §8.2.2), and Chapter 9 for more on 
this
.
Finally, the third type of primary expression is the bare variable reference:
            // Evaluates to the value of the variable i.
sum           // Evaluates to the value of the variable sum.
undefined     // undefined is a global variable, not a keyword like null.
When any identifier appears by itself in a program, JavaScript assumes it is a variable
and looks up its value. If no variable with that name exists, the expression evaluates to
the 
undefined
value. In the strict mode of ECMAScript 5, however, an attempt to eval-
uate a nonexistent variable throws a ReferenceError instead.
4.2  Object and Array Initializers
Object and array initializers are expressions whose value is a newly created object or
array. These initializer expressions are sometimes called “object literals” and “array
literals.” Unlike true literals, however, they are not primary expressions, because they
include a number of subexpressions that specify property and element values. Array
initializers have a slightly simpler syntax, and we’ll begin with those.
An array initializer is a comma-separated list of expressions contained within square
brackets. The value of an array initializer is a newly created array. The elements of this
new array are initialized to the values of the comma-separated expressions:
[]         // An empty array: no expressions inside brackets means no elements
[1+2,3+4]  // A 2-element array.  First element is 3, second is 7
The element expressions in an array initializer can themselves be array initializers,
which means that these expressions can create nested arrays:
58 | Chapter 4: Expressions and Operators
var matrix = [[1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7,8,9]];
The element expressions in an array initializer are evaluated each time the array ini-
tializer is evaluated. This means that the value of an array initializer expression may be
different each time it is evaluated.
Undefined elements can be included in an array literal by simply omitting a value be-
tween commas. For example, the following array contains five elements, including three
undefined elements:
var sparseArray = [1,,,,5];
A single trailing comma is allowed after the last expression in an array initializer and
does not create an undefined element.
Object initializer expressions are like array initializer expressions, but the square brack-
ets are replaced by curly brackets, and each subexpression is prefixed with a property
name and a colon:
var p = { x:2.3, y:-1.2 };  // An object with 2 properties
var q = {};                 // An empty object with no properties
q.x = 2.3; q.y = -1.2;      // Now q has the same properties as p
Object literals can be nested. For example:
var rectangle = { upperLeft:  { x: 2, y: 2 },
lowerRight: { x: 4, y: 5 } };
The expressions in an object initializer are evaluated each time the object initializer is
evaluated, and they need not have constant values: they can be arbitrary JavaScript
expressions. Also, the property names in object literals may be strings rather than iden-
tifiers (this is useful to specify property names that are reserved words or are otherwise
not legal identifiers):
var side = 1;
var square = { "upperLeft":  { x: p.x, y: p.y },
'lowerRight': { x: p.x + side, y: p.y + side}};
We’ll see object and array initializers again in Chapters 6 and 7.
4.3  Function Definition Expressions
A function definition expression defines a JavaScript function, and the value of such
an expression is the newly defined function. In a sense, a function definition expression
is a “function literal” in the same way that an object initializer is an “object literal.” A
function definition expression typically consists of the keyword 
function
followed by
a comma-separated list of zero or more identifiers (the parameter names) in parentheses
and a block of JavaScript code (the function body) in curly braces. For example:
// This function returns the square of the value passed to it.
var square = function(x) { return x * x; }
4.3  Function Definition Expressions | 59
Core JavaScript
A function definition expression can also include a name for the function. Functions
can also be defined using a function statement rather than a function expression. Com-
plete details on function definition are in Chapter 8.
4.4  Property Access Expressions
A property access expression evaluates to the value of an object property or an array
element. JavaScript defines two syntaxes for property access:
expression . identifier
expression [ expression ]
The first style of property access is an expression followed by a period and an identifier.
The expression specifies the object, and the identifier specifies the name of the desired
property. The second style of property access follows the first expression (the object or
array) with another expression in square brackets. This second expression specifies the
name of the desired property of the index of the desired array element. Here are some
concrete examples:
var o = {x:1,y:{z:3}};  // An example object
var a = [o,4,[5,6]];    // An example array that contains the object
o.x                     // => 1: property x of expression o
o.y.z                   // => 3: property z of expression o.y
o["x"]                  // => 1: property x of object o
a[1]                    // => 4: element at index 1 of expression a
a[2]["1"]               // => 6: element at index 1 of expression a[2]
a[0].x                  // => 1: property x of expression a[0]
With either type of property access expression, the expression before the . or [ is first
evaluated. If the value is 
null
or 
undefined
, the expression throws a TypeError, since
these are the two JavaScript values that cannot have properties. If the value is not an
object (or array), it is converted to one (see §3.6). If the object expression is followed
by a dot and an identifier, the value of the property named by that identifier is looked
up and becomes the overall value of the expression. If the object expression is followed
by another expression in square brackets, that second expression is evaluated and con-
verted to a string. The overall value of the expression is then the value of the property
named by that string. In either case, if the named property does not exist, then the value
of the property access expression is 
undefined
.
The 
.identifier
syntax is the simpler of the two property access options, but notice
that it can only be used when the property you want to access has a name that is a legal
identifier, and when you know then name when you write the program. If the property
name is a reserved word or includes spaces or punctuation characters, or when it is a
number (for arrays), you must use the square bracket notation. Square brackets are also
used when the property name is not static but is itself the result of a computation (see
§6.2.1 for an example).
Objects and their properties are covered in detail in Chapter 6, and arrays and their
elements are covered in Chapter 7.
60 | Chapter 4: Expressions and Operators
4.5  Invocation Expressions
An invocation expression is JavaScript’s syntax for calling (or executing) a function or
method. It starts with a function expression that identifies the function to be called.
The function expression is followed by an open parenthesis, a comma-separated list of
zero or more argument expressions, and a close parenthesis. Some examples:
f(0)            // f is the function expression; 0 is the argument expression.
Math.max(x,y,z) // Math.max is the function; x, y and z are the arguments.
a.sort()        // a.sort is the function; there are no arguments.
When an invocation expression is evaluated, the function expression is evaluated first,
and then the argument expressions are evaluated to produce a list of argument values.
If the value of the function expression is not a callable object, a TypeError is thrown.
(All functions are callable. Host objects may also be callable even if they are not func-
tions. This distinction is explored in §8.7.7.) Next, the argument values are assigned,
in order, to the parameter names specified when the function was defined, and then
the body of the function is executed. If the function uses a 
return
statement to return
a value, then that value becomes the value of the invocation expression. Otherwise, the
value of the invocation expression is 
undefined
. Complete details on function invoca-
tion, including an explanation of what happens when the number of argument expres-
sions does not match the number of parameters in the function definition, are in
Chapter 8.
Every invocation expression includes a pair of parentheses and an expression before
the open parenthesis. If that expression is a property access expression, then the invo-
cation is known as a method invocation. In method invocations, the object or array that
is the subject of the property access becomes the value of the 
this
parameter while the
body of the function is being executed. This enables an object-oriented programming
paradigm in which functions (known by their OO name, “methods”) operate on the
object of which they are part. See Chapter 9 for details.
Invocation expressions that are not method invocations normally use the global object
as the value of the 
this
keyword. In ECMAScript 5, however, functions that are defined
in strict mode are invoked with 
undefined
as their 
this
value rather than the global
object. See §5.7.3 for more on strict mode.
4.6  Object Creation Expressions
An object creation expression creates a new object and invokes a function (called a
constructor) to initialize the properties of that object. Object creation expressions are
like invocation expressions except that they are prefixed with the keyword 
new
:
new Object()
new Point(2,3)
4.6  Object Creation Expressions | 61
Core JavaScript
If no arguments are passed to the constructor function in an object creation expression,
the empty pair of parentheses can be omitted:
new Object
new Date
When an object creation expression is evaluated, JavaScript first creates a new empty
object, just like the one created by the object initializer 
{}
. Next, it invokes the specified
function with the specified arguments, passing the new object as the value of the
this
keyword. The function can then use 
this
to initialize the properties of the newly
created object. Functions written for use as constructors do not return a value, and the
value of the object creation expression is the newly created and initialized object. If a
constructor does return an object value, that value becomes the value of the object
creation expression and the newly created object is discarded.
Constructors are explained in more detail in Chapter 9.
4.7  Operator Overview
Operators are used for JavaScript’s arithmetic expressions, comparison expressions,
logical expressions, assignment expressions, and more. Table 4-1 summarizes the op-
erators and serves as a convenient reference.
Note that most operators are represented by punctuation characters such as 
+
and 
=
.
Some, however, are represented by keywords such as 
delete
and 
instanceof
. Keyword
operators are regular operators, just like those expressed with punctuation; they simply
have a less succinct syntax.
Table 4-1 is organized by operator precedence. The operators listed first have higher
precedence than those listed last. Operators separated by a horizontal line have different
precedence levels. The column labeled A gives the operator associativity, which can be
L (left-to-right) or R (right-to-left), and the column N specifies the number of operands.
The column labeled Types lists the expected types of the operands and (after the →
symbol) the result type for the operator. The subsections that follow the table explain
the concepts of precedence, associativity, and operand type. The operators themselves
are individually documented following that discussion.
Table 4-1. JavaScript operators
Operator
Operation
A N
Types
++
Pre- or post-increment
R 1
lval→num
--
Pre- or post-decrement
R 1
lval→num
-
Negate number
R 1
num→num
+
Convert to number
R 1
num→num
~
Invert bits
R 1
int→int
!
Invert boolean value
R 1
bool→bool
62 | Chapter 4: Expressions and Operators
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested