pdf annotation in c# : Add hyperlink pdf application software utility azure html .net visual studio %5BO%60Reilly%5D%20-%20JavaScript.%20The%20Definitive%20Guide,%206th%20ed.%20-%20%5BFlanagan%5D84-part1619

See Also
Function.prototype
Object.hasOwnProperty()
Chapter 6
Object.seal()
ECMAScript 5
prevent the addition or deletion of properties
Synopsis
Object.seal(o)
Arguments
o
The object to be sealed
Returns
The now-sealed argument object 
o
.
Description
Object.seal()
makes 
o
non-extensible (see 
Object.preventExtensions()
) and makes all of its
own properties non-configurable. This has the effect of preventing the addition of new prop-
erties and preventing the deletion of existing properties. Sealing an object is permanent: once
sealed, an object cannot be unsealed.
Note that 
Object.seal()
does not make properties read-only; see 
Object.freeze()
for that.
Also note that 
Object.seal()
does not affect inherited properties. If a sealed object has a non-
sealed object in its prototype chain, then inherited properties may be added or removed.
Note that this is not a method to be invoked on an object: it is a global function and you must
pass an object to it.
See Also
Object.defineProperty()
Object.freeze()
Object.isSealed()
Object.preventExten-
sions()
§6.8.3
Object.toLocaleString()
return an object’s localized string representation
Synopsis
object.toString()
Returns
A string representing the object.
Object.toLocaleString()
Core JavaScript Reference | 823
Core JavaScript
Reference
Add hyperlink pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf edit hyperlink; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
Add hyperlink pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf links; add links pdf document
Description
This method is intended to return a string representation of the object, localized as appropriate
for the current  locale.  The  default 
toLocaleString()
method  provided  by the  Object class
simply calls the 
toString()
method and returns the nonlocalized string that it returns. Note,
however, that other classes, including Array, Date, and Number, define their own versions of
this method to perform localized string conversions. When defining your own classes, you
may want to override this method as well.
See Also
Array.toLocaleString()
Date.toLocaleString()
Number.toLocaleString()
Object.to-
String()
Object.toString()
define an object’s string representation
Synopsis
object.toString()
Returns
A string representing the object.
Description
The 
toString()
method is not one you often call explicitly in your JavaScript programs. In-
stead, you define this method in your objects, and the system calls it whenever it needs to
convert your object to a string.
The JavaScript system invokes the 
toString()
method to convert an object to a string when-
ever the object is used in a string context. For example, an object is converted to a string when
it is passed to a function that expects a string argument:
alert(my_object);
Similarly, objects are converted to strings when they are concatenated to strings with the 
+
operator:
var msg = 'My object is: ' + my_object;
The 
toString()
method is invoked without arguments and should return a string. To be useful,
the string you return should be based, in some way, on the value of the object for which the
method was invoked.
When you define a custom class in JavaScript, it is good practice to define a 
toString()
method
for the class. If you do not, the object inherits the default 
toString()
method from the Object
class. This default method returns a string of the form:
[objectclass]
where 
class
is the class of the object: a value such as “Object”, “String”, “Number”, “Func-
tion”, “Window”, “Document”, and so on. This behavior of the default 
toString()
method
is  occasionally useful  to determine the type or class of an unknown object.  Because most
Object.toString()
824 | Core JavaScript Reference
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. Hyperlink Edit. XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; adding a link to a pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. Hyperlink Edit. XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF
chrome pdf from link; add url link to pdf
objects  have  a  custom  version  of 
toString()
 however,  you  must  explicitly  invoke  the
Object.toString()
method on an object 
o
with code like this:
Object.prototype.toString.apply(o);
Note that this technique for identifying unknown objects works only for built-in objects. If
you define your own object class, it will have a 
class
of “Object”. In this case, you can use
the 
Object.constructor
property to obtain more information about the object.
The 
toString()
method can be quite useful when you are debugging JavaScript programs; it
allows you to print objects and see their value. For this reason alone, it is a good idea to define
toString()
method for every object class you create.
Although the 
toString()
method is usually invoked automatically by the system, there are
times when you may invoke it yourself. For example, you might want to do an explicit con-
version of an object to a string in a situation where JavaScript does not do it automatically for
you:
y = Math.sqrt(x);       // Compute a number
ystr = y.toString();       // Convert it to a string
Note in this example that numbers have a built-in 
toString()
method you can use to force a
conversion.
In  other  circumstances, you can choose to  use  a 
toString()
call even  in  a context where
JavaScript does the conversion automatically. Using 
toString()
explicitly can help to make
your code clearer:
alert(my_obj.toString());
See Also
Object.constructor
Object.toLocaleString()
Object.valueOf()
Object.valueOf()
the primitive value of the specified object
Synopsis
object.valueOf()
Returns
The primitive value associated with the 
object
, if any. If there  is no value associated with
object
, returns the object itself.
Description
The 
valueOf()
method of an object returns the primitive value associated with that object, if
there is one. For objects of type Object, there is no primitive value, and this method simply
returns the object itself.
For objects of type Number, however, 
valueOf()
returns the primitive numeric value repre-
sented by the object. Similarly, it returns the primitive boolean value associated with a Boolean
object and the string associated with a String object.
Object.valueOf()
Core JavaScript Reference | 825
Core JavaScript
Reference
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Word to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
pdf link to attached file; add url pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Excel to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
accessible links in pdf; add hyperlink in pdf
It is rarely necessary to invoke the 
valueOf()
method yourself. JavaScript does this automat-
ically whenever an object is used where a primitive value is expected. In fact, because of this
automatic  invocation  of  the 
valueOf()
method,  it  is  difficult  to  even  distinguish  between
primitive values and their corresponding objects. The 
typeof
operator shows you the differ-
ence between strings and String objects for example, but in practical terms, you can use them
equivalently in your JavaScript code.
The 
valueOf()
methods of the Number, Boolean, and String objects convert these wrapper
objects to the primitive values they represent. The 
Object()
constructor performs the opposite
operation when invoked with a number, boolean, or string argument: it wraps the primitive
value in an appropriate object wrapper. JavaScript performs this primitive-to-object conver-
sion for you in almost all circumstances, so it is rarely necessary to invoke the 
Object()
con-
structor in this way.
In some circumstances, you may want to define a custom 
valueOf()
method for your own
objects. For example, you might define a JavaScript object type to represent complex numbers
(a real number plus an imaginary number). As part of this object type, you would probably
define  methods  for  performing  complex  addition,  multiplication,  and  so  on  (see Exam-
ple 9-3). But you might also want to treat your complex numbers like ordinary real numbers
by discarding the imaginary part. To achieve this, you might do something like the following:
Complex.prototype.valueOf = new Function("return this.real");
With this 
valueOf()
method defined for your Complex object type, you can, for example, pass
one of your complex number objects to 
Math.sqrt()
, which computes the square root of the
real portion of the complex number.
See Also
Object.toString()
parseFloat()
convert a string to a number
Synopsis
parseFloat(s)
Arguments
s
The string to be parsed and converted to a number.
Returns
The parsed number, or 
NaN
if 
s
does not begin with a valid number. In JavaScript 1.0, 
parse
Float()
returns 0 instead of 
NaN
when 
s
cannot be parsed as a number.
Description
parseFloat()
parses and returns the first number that occurs in 
s
. Parsing stops, and the value
is  returned,  when 
parseFloat()
encounters  a character in 
s
that  is not a  valid  part of the
parseFloat()
826 | Core JavaScript Reference
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
add hyperlinks to pdf online; add a link to a pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Please click to see details. PDF Hyperlink Edit. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document
add link to pdf; clickable links in pdf from word
number. If 
s
does not begin with a number that 
parseFloat()
can parse, the function returns
the not-a-number value 
NaN
. Test for this return value with the 
isNaN()
function. If you want
to parse only the integer portion of a number, use 
parseInt()
instead of 
parseFloat()
.
See Also
isNaN()
parseInt()
parseInt()
convert a string to an integer
Synopsis
parseInt(s)
parseInt(s, radix)
Arguments
s
The string to be parsed.
radix
An optional integer argument that represents the radix (i.e., base) of the number to be
parsed. If this argument is omitted or is 0, the number is parsed in base 10—or in base
16  if  it  begins  with 0x  or  0X.  If this argument is less  than 2 or greater  than  36, 
par
seInt()
returns 
NaN
.
Returns
The parsed number, or 
NaN
if 
s
does  not begin  with a  valid integer. In JavaScript  1.0, 
par
seInt()
returns 0 instead of 
NaN
when it cannot parse 
s
.
Description
parseInt()
parses and  returns the first  number (with an optional leading minus sign) that
occurs in 
s
. Parsing stops, and the value is returned, when 
parseInt()
encounters a character
in 
s
that is not a valid digit for the specified 
radix
. If 
s
does not begin with a number that
parseInt()
can parse, the function returns the not-a-number value 
NaN
. Use the 
isNaN()
func-
tion to test for this return value.
The 
radix
argument  specifies  the  base  of  the  number  to  be parsed.  Specifying  10  makes
parseInt()
parse a decimal number. The value 8 specifies that an octal number (using digits
0 through 7) is to be parsed. The value 16 specifies a hexadecimal value, using digits 0 through
9 and letters A through F. 
radix
can be any value between 2 and 36.
If 
radix
is 0 or is not specified, 
parseInt()
tries to determine the radix of the number from
s
. If 
s
begins (after an optional minus sign) with 
0x
parseInt()
parses the remainder of 
s
as
a hexadecimal number. Otherwise 
parseInt()
parses it as a decimal number.
Example
parseInt("19", 10);  // Returns 19  (10 + 9)
parseInt("11", 2);   // Returns 3   (2 + 1)
parseInt()
Core JavaScript Reference | 827
Core JavaScript
Reference
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. C#.NET Sample Code: Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks; adding hyperlinks to pdf documents
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Create signatures in existing PDF signature fields; Create signatures in new fields which hold the signature; Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit
adding hyperlinks to a pdf; add hyperlink to pdf in
parseInt("17", 8);   // Returns 15  (8 + 7)
parseInt("1f", 16);  // Returns 31  (16 + 15)
parseInt("10");      // Returns 10
parseInt("0x10");    // Returns 16
See Also
isNaN()
parseFloat()
RangeError
thrown when a number is out of its legal range
Object → Error → RangeError
Constructor
new RangeError()
new RangeError(message)
Arguments
message
An  optional  error  message that provides details about the exception. If specified, this
argument is used as the value for the 
message
property of the RangeError object.
Returns
A newly constructed RangeError object. If the 
message
argument is specified, the Error object
uses  it  as the  value  of  its 
message
property;  otherwise,  it  uses  an implementation-defined
default string as the value of that property. When the 
RangeError()
constructor is called as a
function, without the 
new
operator, it behaves just as it would when called with the 
new
op-
erator.
Properties
message
An error message that provides details about the exception. This property holds the string
passed to the constructor or an implementation-defined default string. See 
Error.mes-
sage
for details.
name
A string that specifies the type of the exception. All RangeError objects inherit the value
“RangeError” for this property.
Description
An instance of the RangeError class is thrown when a numeric value is not in its legal range.
For example, setting the length of an array to a negative number causes a RangeError to be
thrown. See 
Error
for details about throwing and catching exceptions.
See Also
Error
Error.message
Error.name
RangeError
828 | Core JavaScript Reference
ReferenceError
thrown when reading a variable that does not exist
Object → Error → ReferenceError
Constructor
new ReferenceError()
new ReferenceError(message)
Arguments
message
An  optional  error  message that provides details about the exception. If specified, this
argument is used as the value for the 
message
property of the ReferenceError object.
Returns
A newly constructed ReferenceError object. If the 
message
argument is specified, the Error
object uses it as the value of its 
message
property; otherwise, it uses an implementation-defined
default string as the value of that property. When the 
ReferenceError()
constructor is called
as a function, without the 
new
operator, it behaves just as it would with the 
new
operator.
Properties
message
An error message that provides details about the exception. This property holds the string
passed to the constructor or an implementation-defined default string. See 
Error.mes-
sage
for details.
name
A string that specifies the type of the exception. All ReferenceError objects inherit the
value “ReferenceError” for this property.
Description
An instance of the ReferenceError class is thrown when you attempt to read the value of a
variable that does not exist. See 
Error
for details about throwing and catching exceptions.
See Also
Error
Error.message
Error.name
RegExp
regular expressions for pattern matching
Object → RegExp
Literal Syntax
/pattern/attributes
Constructor
new RegExp(pattern, attributes)
RegExp
Core JavaScript Reference | 829
Core JavaScript
Reference
Arguments
pattern
A string that specifies the pattern of the regular expression or another regular expression.
attributes
An optional string containing any of the “g”, “i”, and “m” attributes that specify global,
case-insensitive, and multiline matches, respectively. The “m” attribute is not available
prior to ECMAScript standardization.  If  the 
pattern
argument is a regular expression
instead of a string, this argument must be omitted.
Returns
A new 
RegExp
object, with the specified pattern and flags. If the 
pattern
argument is a regular
expression rather than a string, the 
RegExp()
constructor creates a new RegExp object using
the same pattern and flags as the specified RegExp. If 
RegExp()
is called as a function without
the 
new
operator, it behaves just as it would with the 
new
operator, except when 
pattern
is a
regular expression; in that case, it simply returns 
pattern
instead of creating a new RegExp
object.
Throws
SyntaxError
If 
pattern
is not a legal regular expression, or if 
attributes
contains characters other than
“g”, “i”, and “m”.
TypeError
If 
pattern
is a RegExp object, and the 
attributes
argument is not omitted.
Instance Properties
global
Whether the RegExp has the “g” attribute.
ignoreCase
Whether the RegExp has the “i” attribute.
lastIndex
The character position of the last match; used for finding multiple matches in a string.
multiline
Whether the RegExp has the “m” attribute.
source
The source text of the regular expression.
Methods
exec()
Performs powerful, general-purpose pattern matching.
test()
Tests whether a string contains a pattern.
RegExp
830 | Core JavaScript Reference
Description
The RegExp object represents a regular expression, a powerful tool for performing pattern
matching on strings. See Chapter 10 for complete details on regular-expression syntax and use.
See Also
Chapter 10
RegExp.exec()
general-purpose pattern matching
Synopsis
regexp.exec(string)
Arguments
string
The string to be searched.
Returns
An array containing the results of the match or 
null
if no match was found. The format of the
returned array is described below.
Throws
TypeError
If this method is invoked on an object that is not a RegExp.
Description
exec()
is the most powerful of all the RegExp and String pattern-matching methods. It is a
general-purpose  method  that  is  somewhat  more  complex  to  use  than 
RegExp.test()
,
String.search()
String.replace()
, and 
String.match()
.
exec()
searches 
string
for text that matches 
regexp
. If it finds a match, it returns an array of
results; otherwise, it returns 
null
. Element 0 of the returned array is the matched text. Element
1 is the text that matched the first parenthesized subexpression, if any, within 
regexp
. Element
2 contains  the text that  matched  the  second subexpression,  and so on.  The array 
length
property  specifies the number  of  elements  in  the  array, as  usual.  In addition  to the array
elements and the 
length
property, the value returned by 
exec()
also has two other properties.
The 
index
property specifies the character position of the first character of the matched text.
The 
input
property refers to 
string
. This returned array is the same as the array that is returned
by the 
String.match()
method, when invoked on a nonglobal RegExp object.
When 
exec()
is invoked on a nonglobal pattern, it performs the search and returns the result
described earlier. When 
regexp
is a global regular expression, however, 
exec()
behaves in a
slightly more complex way. It begins searching 
string
at the character position specified by
the 
lastIndex
property of 
regexp
. When it finds a match, it sets 
lastIndex
to the position of
the first character after the match. This means that you can invoke 
exec()
repeatedly in order
to loop through all matches in a string. When 
exec()
cannot find any more matches, it returns
RegExp.exec()
Core JavaScript Reference | 831
Core JavaScript
Reference
null
and resets 
lastIndex
to zero. If you begin searching a new string immediately after suc-
cessfully finding a match in another string, you must be careful to manually reset 
lastIndex
to zero.
Note that 
exec()
always includes full details of every match in the array it returns, whether
or not 
regexp
is a global pattern. This is  where 
exec()
differs from 
String.match()
, which
returns much less information when used with global patterns. Calling the 
exec()
method
repeatedly in a loop is the only way to obtain complete pattern-matching information for a
global pattern.
Example
You can use 
exec()
in a loop to find all matches within a string. For example:
var pattern = /\bJava\w*\b/g;
var text = "JavaScript is more fun than Java or JavaBeans!";
var result;
while((result = pattern.exec(text)) != null) {
alert("Matched '" + result[0] +
"' at position " + result.index +
" next search begins at position " + pattern.lastIndex);
}
See Also
RegExp.lastIndex
RegExp.test()
String.match()
String.replace()
String.search()
;
Chapter 10
RegExp.global
whether a regular expression matches globally
Synopsis
regexp.global
Description
global
is a read-only boolean property of RegExp objects. It specifies whether a particular
regular  expression  performs  global  matching—i.e.,  whether  it  was  created  with  the  “g”
attribute.
RegExp.ignoreCase
whether a regular expression is case-insensitive
Synopsis
regexp.ignoreCase
RegExp.global
832 | Core JavaScript Reference
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested