pdf annotation in c# : Add url link to pdf application software tool html winforms azure online Too-Good-to-be-True-Private-Prisons-in-America0-part167

Too Good to be True 
Private Prisons in America 
Cody Mason 
January 2012 
Add url link to pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf link to attached file; convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks
Add url link to pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlinks pdf file; pdf links
This report was written by Cody Mason, program associate at The 
Sentencing Project. 
The Sentencing Project is a national non-profit organization engaged 
in research and advocacy on criminal justice issues. 
The work of The Sentencing Project is supported by many individual 
donors and contributions from the following: 
Morton K. and Jane Blaustein Foundation  
Ford Foundation  
Bernard F. and Alva B. Gimbel Foundation  
General Board of Global Ministries of the United Methodist Church  
Herb Block Foundation  
JK Irwin Foundation 
Open Society Institute  
Public Welfare Foundation  
David Rockefeller Fund 
Elizabeth B. and Arthur E. Roswell Foundation
Tikva Grassroots Empowerment Fund of Tides Foundation  
Wallace Global Fund      
Working Assets/CREDO 
Copyright @ 2012 by The Sentencing Project. Reproduction of this 
document in full or in part, and in print or electronic format, only by 
permission of The Sentencing Project 
For further information: 
The Sentencing Project 
1705 DeSales St., NW 
8th Floor 
Washington, D.C. 20036 
(202) 628-0871 
www.sentencingproject.org 
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
change link in pdf; add url pdf
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
type="text/css"/> <link rel="stylesheet _viewerTopToolbar.addTab(_tabRedact); //add Tab "Sample customStyle({ background: "url('RasterEdge_Resource_Files/images
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; add url to pdf
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
n 2010, private prisons held 128,195 of the 1.6 million state and federal 
prisoners in the United States, representing eight percent of the total 
population. For the period 1999-2010, the number of individuals held in private 
prisons grew by 80 percent, compared to 18 percent for the overall prison 
population. While both federal and state governments increasingly relied on 
privatization, the federal prison system’s commitment to privatization grew much 
more dramatically. The number of federal prisoners held in private prisons rose from 
3,828 to 33,830, an increase of 784 percent, while the number of state prisoners 
incarcerated privately grew by 40 percent, from 67,380 to 94,365. Today, 30 states 
maintain some level of privatization, with seven states housing more than a quarter 
of their prison populations privately.
Prisoners Held in Private Prisons in the United States
2
1999 
2010 
Change 1999-2010 
Total Prison Population 
1,366,721
1,612,395
+18% 
Total Private 
71,208
128,195
+80% 
Federal Private 
3,828
33,830
+784% 
State Private 
67,380
94,365
+40% 
ORIGINS OF PRIVATE PRISONS 
While the expansion of prison privatization is relatively recent, the presence of 
privatized corrections can be traced back to early American history. At that time 
local governments would reimburse private jailers to hold people who were facing 
trial.
3
This contracting was a result of criminal justice policies of the time that 
focused on fines and public humiliation, including the stockades and branding. 
During this period, jailers charged states high rates to incarcerate prisoners and were 
known to imprison persons who owed debts until they were paid in full.
4
This private-public relationship changed with the creation of the first publicly run 
prison in 1790 and, with the notable exception of convict leasing for forced labor, 
the next century saw private business involvement in corrections limited to providing 
contracted services, such as food preparation, medical care, and transportation.
5
Nongovernmental organizations were also heavily involved in maintaining juvenile 
detention facilities, but this was largely not for profit.
6
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Download and Save Image from Web URL
to download image from website link more easily from image downloading from web URL, RasterEdge .NET powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add links to pdf file; change link in pdf file
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
pdf hyperlinks; add a link to a pdf
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
tion.
9
REEMERGENCE OF PRIVATE PRISON COMPANIES 
Public policies adopted during the 1970s and 1980s facilitated an increase in prison 
privatization. The War on Drugs and harsher sentencing policies, including 
mandatory minimum sentences, fueled a rapid expansion in the nation’s prison 
population.
7
The resulting burden on the public sector led private companies to 
reemerge during the 1970s to operate halfway houses. They extended their reach in 
the 1980s by contracting with the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) to 
detain undocumented immigrants.
8
These forms of privatization “on the ‘soft’ end 
of the correctional continuum” were followed by the reappearance of for-profit 
prison privatiza
Established in 1983, Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) claimed an ability 
to build and operate state and federal prisons with the same quality of service 
provided in publicly operated prisons, but at a lower cost. One year later, CCA was 
awarded a contract for a facility in Hamilton County, Tennessee, the first instance of 
the public sector contracting management of a prison to a private company.
10
In 
1985, CCA attempted to assume management of the entire Tennessee prison system, 
but that offer was rejected by the state legislature after facing strong opposition over 
CCA’s growing reputation for cost overruns and inmate escapes. Despite this 
setback, the company garnered additional contracts in Texas, Tennessee, and 
Kentucky by the end of 1987.
11
Other startups and more established corporations, 
such as Wackenhut Corrections Corporation (now the GEO Group, Inc.), also 
entered into the prison business. 
Today, CCA and GEO Group collectively manage over half of the contracts in the 
United States, which resulted in combined revenues exceeding $2.9 billion in 2010.
12
CCA, as the largest private prison company, manages more than 75,000 inmates and 
detainees in 66 facilities.
13
GEO Group, as CCA’s closest competitor, operates 
slightly fewer. Smaller companies, including Management & Training Corporation, 
LCS Correctional Services, and Emerald Corrections also hold multiple prison 
contracts throughout the United States. 
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
add hyperlink in pdf; add hyperlink pdf file
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
add hyperlink pdf; accessible links in pdf
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
Developments in Privatization 
Gary Johnson’s platform during his initial 1994 run for governor of New 
Mexico included a pledge to privatize every prison in the state. By the time 
he left office in 2003 44.2 percent of the state’s prisoners were in privately 
run facilities.
14, 15
Ohio opened its first private prison in 2000 with the goal of saving $1.6 
million per year.
16
This raised the number of inmates held privately in Ohio 
from zero in 1999 to over 3,000 in 2010. 
North Carolina canceled two contracts with CCA due to concerns about the 
company’s failure to meet contract requirements and banned the practice of 
bringing in prisoners from out of state. California instituted a similar ban and 
Arkansas ended two contracts with Wackenhut (GEO) in 2001.
17
In 2004 Nevada Governor Kenny Guinn ended CCA’s contract with the 
state after the company was alleged to have provided substandard services.
18
Vermont agreed to start sending prisoners to CCA facilities in Tennessee and 
Kentucky in 2004.
19
This helped bring the proportion of inmates held 
privately from zero in 2003 to over 20 percent in 2004. This trend led to 
Vermont holding over 34 percent of its population privately in 2008, before 
declining to 27 percent by 2010.  
In 2011 California ended contracts for several GEO Group facilities as part 
of its Criminal Justice Realignment Plan to reduce prison populations and 
spending.
20
States such as Florida, Ohio, Arizona, New Hampshire, and Utah have been 
considering beginning or expanding private prison contracting.
21, 22, 23
The form by which modern prison privatization occurs varies. Some facilities only 
manage individuals from a certain region, while others hold inmates from across the 
country. The latter of these situations complicates the already unwieldy task of 
applying governmental regulations and oversight due to the variance in state laws and 
bureaucracy. The transportation of inmates over far distances also negatively affects 
prisoners’ ability to visit with family or consult with attorneys while incarcerated. The 
scale of services involved in privatization also varies from prison to prison. 
Companies may own and operate a facility, fully manage a state-owned institution, or 
may only be partially responsible for operations.
24
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note.
pdf hyperlink; add link to pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
check links in pdf; active links in pdf
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
Change in Private Prison Populations, 1999-2010
25
Number in Private Prisons 
Percentage of Population 
Jurisdiction 
1999 
2010 
Percent 
Change 
1999 
2010 
Percent 
Change 
Alabama 
1,024 
-- 
3.2% 
-- 
Alaska 
1,387 
1,873 
35% 
35.1% 
33.5% 
-5% 
Arizona 
1,392 
5,356 
285% 
5.4% 
13.3% 
146% 
Arkansas 
1,224 
-100% 
10.7% 
-100% 
California 
4,621 
2,170 
-53% 
2.8% 
1.3% 
-54% 
Colorado 
4,498 
-- 
19.7% 
-- 
Connecticut 
883 
-- 
4.6% 
-- 
Delaware 
-- 
-- 
Florida 
3,773 
11,796 
213% 
5.4% 
11.3% 
109% 
Georgia 
3,001 
5,233 
74% 
7.1% 
10.6% 
49% 
Hawaii 
1,168 
1,931 
65% 
23.8% 
32.7% 
37% 
Idaho 
400 
2,236 
459% 
8.3% 
30.1% 
263% 
Illinois 
-- 
-- 
Indiana 
936 
2,817 
201% 
4.8% 
10.1% 
110% 
Iowa 
-- 
-- 
Kansas 
-- 
-- 
Kentucky 
1,700 
2,127 
25% 
11.1% 
10.4% 
-6% 
Louisiana 
3,080 
2,921 
-5% 
9% 
7.4% 
-18% 
Maine 
22 
-100% 
1.3% 
-100% 
Maryland 
131 
70 
-47% 
0.6% 
0.3% 
-50% 
Massachusetts 
-- 
-- 
Michigan 
301 
-100% 
0.6% 
-100% 
Minnesota 
80 
-100% 
1.3% 
-100% 
Mississippi 
3,429 
5,241 
53% 
18.8% 
24.9% 
32% 
Missouri 
-- 
-- 
Montana 
726 
1,502 
107% 
24.6% 
40.4% 
64% 
Nebraska 
-- 
-- 
Nevada 
561 
-100% 
5.9% 
-100% 
New 
Hampshire 
-- 
-- 
New Jersey 
2,517 
2,841 
13% 
8% 
11.4% 
43% 
New Mexico 
1,873 
2,905 
55% 
38.6% 
43.6% 
13% 
New York 
-- 
-- 
North Carolina 
1,395 
208 
-85% 
4.5% 
0.5% 
-89% 
North Dakota 
-- 
-- 
Ohio 
3,038 
-- 
5.9% 
-- 
Oklahoma 
6,228 
6,019 
-3% 
27.8% 
22.9% 
-18% 
Oregon 
-- 
-- 
Pennsylvania 
1,015 
-- 
2% 
-- 
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
Rhode Island 
-- 
-- 
South Carolina 
17 
-- 
0.1% 
-- 
South Dakota 
46 
-89% 
1.8% 
0.1% 
-94% 
Tennessee 
3,476 
5,120 
47% 
15.4% 
18.7% 
21% 
Texas 
11,653 
19,155 
64% 
7.1% 
11% 
55% 
Utah 
248 
-100% 
4.6% 
-100% 
Vermont 
562 
-- 
27% 
-- 
Virginia 
1,542 
1,560 
1% 
4.8% 
4.2% 
-12% 
Washington 
331 
-100% 
2.3% 
-100% 
West Virginia 
-- 
-- 
Wisconsin 
3,421 
25 
-99% 
16.8% 
0.1% 
-99% 
Wyoming 
281 
217 
-23% 
16.4% 
10.3% 
-37% 
Federal 
3,828 
33,830 
784% 
2.8% 
16.1% 
475% 
State 
67,380 
94,365 
40% 
5.5% 
6.8% 
24% 
Total 
71,208 
128,195 
80% 
5.2% 
8% 
54% 
GROWTH OF PRIVATIZATION, 1999-2010
26
States Contracting for Private Prisons 
In 1999 private prison contracts existed in 31 states. That figure grew to 33 states by 
2004, before declining to 30 by 2010. Between 1999 and 2010: 
Six states -- Vermont, Ohio, Connecticut, Alabama, Pennsylvania, and South 
Carolina began using private prisons. 
Nine states completely eliminated their reliance on prison privatization. They 
were: Arkansas, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, North 
Dakota, Utah, and Washington.
27
In addition, Wisconsin reduced its number 
of privately held prisoners from 3,421 to 25. 
Delaware, Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, Missouri, Nebraska, New 
Hampshire, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, and West Virginia did not 
utilize private prisons at all. 
Changes in Private Prison Populations 
In 2010, the number of inmates held privately in the 30 practicing states ranged from 
a low of 5 in South Dakota to a high of 19,155 in Texas. Overall: 
Florida had the second largest population with 11,000 inmates. Colorado, 
Tennessee, Georgia, Mississippi, Arizona, and Oklahoma held between 4,500 
to 6,000 inmates privately in 2010. 
Five states more than doubled the number of individuals in private prisons. 
Idaho had the largest increase, holding 459 percent more inmates in 2010 
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
than in 1999. Arizona, Florida, and Indiana each increased their population 
by over 200 percent. Montana more than doubled its population. An 
additional five states experienced increases of more than 50 percent – 
Georgia, Hawaii, Texas, New Mexico, and Mississippi. 
Wisconsin, South Dakota, North Carolina, California, and Maryland each 
reduced their population by over 40 percent. 
Private Prison Populations, 1999-2010
28
Overall Rates of Privatization 
New Mexico had the highest proportion of its population held privately in both 1999 
and 2010, with respective rates of 39 and 44 percent. By 2010: 
Five additional states incarcerated more than a quarter of their prison 
population privately – Montana (40 percent), Alaska (33.5 percent), Hawaii 
(32.7 percent), Idaho (30.1 percent), and Vermont (27 percent). 
Nine states held between 10 to 20 percent of their prison population 
privately – Colorado, Tennessee, Arizona, New Jersey, Florida, Georgia, 
Kentucky, Wyoming, and Indiana. 
THE ISSUES OF PRISON PRIVATIZATION  
The growth of prison privatization has been sustained by claims that privately 
operated facilities are more cost efficient at providing services than publicly-run 
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
institutions. A look at the evidence shows that this assertion is not supported. 
Moreover, there are significant problems when incarceration is turned into a for-
profit industry. 
Fiscal Savings through Cost Containment  
Private prisons supporters assert that the private sector saves resources through 
greater efficiencies. These claims are supported by some reports showing that private 
prisons produce cost savings, largely through lower salaries and benefits by 
employing mostly nonunion employees. It is also argued that governments can 
benefit in the short term through the direct sale of correctional facilities to private 
companies and can save money when constructing new facilities through public-
private initiatives, rather than solely through government funding. However, studies 
have shown these benefits to be mostly illusory.  
A 1996 report by the U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) looked at four state-
funded studies and one commissioned by the federal government. The 
methodologies and results varied across the studies, with two showing no major 
difference in efficiency between private and public prisons, a third showing that 
private facilities resulted in savings to the state of seven percent, and the fourth 
finding the cost of a private facility falling somewhere between that of two similar 
public prisons. Another study also found significant cost savings associated with 
private prisons, but the GAO criticized the report for using hypothetical facilities in 
its comparisons. The authors noted that they could not definitively conclude that 
privatization would not save money, but also established that, “…these studies do 
not offer substantial evidence that savings have occurred.”
29
Similar conclusions were reached in a 2009 meta-analysis by researchers at the 
University of Utah that looked at eight cost comparison studies resulting in vastly 
different conclusions. Of the eight studies, half of them found private prisons to be 
more cost-efficient. The other four were evenly split between public facilities being 
more cost-efficient and finding both types of prisons statistically even. This 
information led the researchers to conclude that, “…prison privatization provides 
neither a clear advantage nor disadvantage compared to publicly managed prisons” 
and that “…cost savings from privatization are not guaranteed.” While not directly 
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
resolving the question of whether private or public facilities are economically 
superior, the report did find the value of moving toward prison privatization to be 
“questionable.”
30 
The GAO’s critique of the methodologies used in comparisons is not unique. 
Former Bureau of Prisons Director of Research Gerry Gaes made similar 
observations when reviewing two reports that found different levels of savings when 
comparing the same three public prisons with a private facility. In his 2008 report for 
the National Institute of Justice he observed that the more favorable study for 
privatization did not adjust the data on the prisons to scale and failed to take into 
account the proper amount of overhead costs for the private prison. Gaes noted that 
these types of cost comparisons are deceivingly complicated and that current 
research is highly limited.
31
Additional complications were raised in a 2004 study that found that state-run 
prisons are generally left to take on a disproportionate number of expensive and 
high-risk inmates. For example, inmates with minimum or medium levels of security 
classification made up 90 percent of the private sector’s population, compared with 
only 69 percent in the public sector.
32
Many of these results have been replicated in individual states. In Ohio, state officials 
contend that private facilities regularly meet or surpass the legal requirement of 
containing costs at least five percent below a state-run equivalent.
33
However, a 
report by the nonpartisan Policy Matters Ohio criticized the state’s measurements for 
comparing privately operated prisons to hypothetical public facilities, exaggerating 
overhead and staff costs for public prisons, and failing to account for the higher 
amount of expensive and high security inmates in public prisons. Holding these 
factors to more realistic standards greatly reduced if not completely diminished the 
purported advantages of private prisons.
34
In Arizona, which also has cost-saving requirements for private prisons, research 
conducted in 2010 by the state’s Department of Corrections found that the state had 
not saved money by contracting out minimum security beds, and that more money is 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested