pdf annotation in c# : Add hyperlinks pdf file SDK Library project wpf asp.net windows UWP Too-Good-to-be-True-Private-Prisons-in-America1-part168

TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
actually spent on private medium security beds than would be spent in a publicly 
operated institution.
35
Private Prisons as a Job Creator? 
In 2000 the West Texas town of Littlefield used city bonds to build a prison to 
be managed by Wackenhut Corrections (GEO). There was hope that this would 
increase revenue and job opportunities, but the prison closed after it was 
“plagued by mismanagement, riots and an inmate suicide.” Wackenhut soon 
abandoned the facility and the town was forced to raise taxes, cut services, and 
eliminate jobs in order to manage the resulting $9 million debt left by the 
prison.
36
This case is not unique, and recent research has found evidence that 
even under normal circumstances “prisons have not and are not likely to make a 
positive contribution to local employment growth.”
37
As in Littlefield, prison 
construction can actually leave communities in a worse situation than they were 
before. 
Despite these findings, privatization continues to be promoted as an effective cost 
saving measure and job creator throughout the country. For example, in 2011:  
The federal government contracted with the GEO Group for two 650-bed 
immigration detention facilities in California.
38
This followed a deal with 
GEO Group for a 600-bed detention center in Texas in 2010.
39
Ohio sold a prison to CCA and handed over operations of another facility to 
Management Training Corp. as part of that state’s cost-saving privatization 
plans.
40, 41
Florida Governor Rick Scott attempted to privatize 29 prisons and prison 
healthcare services statewide. Florida has encountered oversight and financial 
issues with private prisons in the past.
42, 43
Legislators attempted to reintroduce the use of private prisons in Maine. The 
bill was ultimately killed in January 2012.
44
CCA was in negotiations to manage 9,000 beds in Harris County, Texas, 
despite opposition by the county sheriff.
45
GEO Group’s subsidiary, GEO 
Care, also opened a mental health facility in Texas in 2011.
46
Pennsylvania hired an investment bank to assist in the privatization of state 
functions and assets, which could include prison healthcare.
47
The city of Waurika, Oklahoma advanced plans for the construction of a 
private prison in order to avoid “economic stagnation.”
48
Georgia opened an $80 million prison that was created in partnership with 
the GEO Group.
49
CCA also announced plans to begin operating a new 
1,150-bed facility in March 2012.
50
Add hyperlinks pdf file - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; add a link to a pdf file
Add hyperlinks pdf file - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding hyperlinks to pdf documents; adding hyperlinks to a pdf
10 
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
Arizona attempted to add 5,000 new private prison beds, despite a budget 
deficit that led to cuts in education and Medicaid spending.
51, 52, 53
Services and Safety 
Advocates claim that privatization has worked in other industries with equal, if not 
superior, quality of service and that the same is true for prisons. However, private 
companies face a challenge in attempting to reduce costs while offering all the 
services necessary to maintaining safety in prisons. The main reason for this is that 
personnel and programs, the two most expensive aspects of incarceration, are among 
the services that receive comparatively less funding in order to contain costs.
54
This 
is particularly true for labor costs, which normally account for 60 to 70 percent o
annual operating budgets.
55
“You can begin to squeeze money out of the system. Maybe you can squeeze a 
half a percent out, who knows? But it’s not as if these systems are overfunded to 
begin with. And at some point, you start to lose quality. And because quality is 
very difficult to measure in prisons, I’m just worried that you’re getting in a race 
to the bottom.” 
- Former BOP Director of Research Gerry Gaes on the “McDonaldization” of 
private    prisons.
56
Privately managed prisons attempt to control costs by regularly providing lower 
levels of staff benefits, salary, and salary advancement than publicly-run facilities 
(equal to about $5,327 less in annual salary for new recruits and $14,901 less in 
maximum annual salaries). On average, private prison employees also receive 58 
hours less training than their publicly employed counterparts.
57
Consequently, there 
are higher employee turnover rates in private prisons than in publicly operated 
facilities.
58
These dynamics may contribute to safety problems within prisons. Studies have 
found that assaults in private prisons can occur at double the rate found in public 
facilities.
59
Researchers also find that public facilities tend to be safer than their 
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Export PDF images to HTML images. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF;
add email link to pdf; add hyperlink pdf file
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Add necessary references: This professional .NET solution that is designed to convert PDF file to HTML web page
add url to pdf; add url pdf
11 
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
private counterparts and that “privately operated prisons appear to have systemic 
problems in maintaining secure facilities.”
60, 61
Specific events that have endangered prisoners include: 
The Walnut Grove Youth Correctional Facility in Mississippi is currently 
under federal investigation after receiving hundreds of brutality complaints.
62
The facility, which is run by the GEO Group, is also the subject of a federal 
lawsuit claiming that inmates “live in unconstitutional and inhumane 
conditions and endure great risks to their safety and security” due to 
understaffing, violence, corruption, and a lack of proper medical care.
63
In May 2011, a CCA prison psychiatrist in Florida was accused of asking 
female inmates to give him lap dances and to expose themselves. It is also 
alleged that he was offering to trade medication for sex.
64
CCA’s Idaho Correctional Center was accused of being run as a “gladiator 
school” in 2010. Footage from the facility showed guards standing by as one 
inmate beat another into a coma. It was alleged that staff members used 
violence and the threat of violence to gain leverage of inmates.
65
In 2009, Hawaii Governor Linda Lingle announced plans to bring back all of 
the state’s 168 female prisoners being held in the CCA-run Otter Creek 
Correctional Center in Kentucky. The governor made the decision over 
concerns of sexual abuse. The facility had a disproportionate number of male 
workers for a female prison and was found to have four times the level of 
sexual abuse compared to a state-run counterpart in 2007.
66
In February 2007 an African man was left dying on the floor from a head 
injury for 13 hours at the CCA-run Elizabeth Detention Center in New 
Jersey. At one time officials discussed sending the body back to Guinea in 
order to deter the man’s widow from traveling to the U.S. and drawing 
attention to the death.
67
Private prison companies have also been cited for endangering inmates by providing 
inadequate healthcare services. In 2001 a Florida grand jury found that CCA facility 
staff, including a nurse, “failed to demonstrate adequate health training,” which 
contributed to the death of an inmate who swallowed several Ecstasy pills.
68
Another 
complaint against CCA’s medical services involved an inmate who died after officials 
allegedly refused to fill a $35 prescription for his hereditary angioedema.
69
An 
independent report to the Mississippi Department of Corrections found that the 
GEO-run Eastern Mississippi Correctional Facility inappropriately downgraded 
mental health diagnoses, discontinued medicine, failed to clean feces and blood out 
of cell units, and rarely provided mental health care, even when requested.
70
One 
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
all PDF page contents in VB.NET, including text, image, hyperlinks, etc. Add necessary references to replace a PDF page with PDF page from other PDF file using VB
adding hyperlinks to pdf files; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in
PDF document is an easy work and gives quick access to PDF page and file, or even hyperlinks. How to VB.NET: Create Thumbnail for PDF. Add necessary references:
change link in pdf; accessible links in pdf
12 
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
report surmises that the failure to provide proper medical care is likely contributed to 
by the maximization of profits at the expense of employee training.
71
Politicization of Privatization 
The overarching philosophy driving these developments is that privatization is often, 
if not always, preferable to public ownership because of the purported efficiency of 
private markets. The evidence does not support this point view, however, and a key 
concern in this area relates to the for-profit prison companies’ financial motive, 
which is summed up in Correction Corporation of America’s 2010 Annual Report: 
Our growth is generally dependent upon our ability to obtain new contracts to 
develop and manage new correctional and detention facilities. This possible 
growth depends on a number of factors we cannot control, including crime rates 
and sentencing patterns in various jurisdictions and acceptance of 
privatization. The demand for our facilities and services could be adversely 
affected by the relaxation of enforcement efforts, leniency in conviction or parole 
standards and sentencing practices or through the decriminalization of certain 
activities that are currently proscribed by our criminal laws.
72 
In order to overcome these challenges, private prison companies previously joined 
with lawmakers, corporations, and interest groups to advocate for privatization 
through the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). This organization is a 
nonprofit membership association focused on advancing “the Jeffersonian principles 
of free markets, limited government, federalism, and individual liberty.”
73
This is 
pursued in part by advocating for large-scale privatization of governmental functions. 
CCA paid between $7,000 and $25,000 per year as an association member before 
leaving the organization in 2010. CCA contributed additional funds to sit on issue 
task forces and sponsor events hosting legislators.
74,
75
Some media reports have 
listed GEO Group as a current or recent member of ALEC, but they have not been 
a member for more than a decade, according to the company’s vice president for 
corporate relations.
76
PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
with advanced capabilities, such as text extraction, hyperlinks, bookmarks and NET Imaging SDK, you may add it on you to quickly convert your PDF images into
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; c# read pdf from url
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
by this .NET Imaging PDF Reader Add-on. Include extraction of text, hyperlinks, bookmarks and metadata; Annotate and redact in PDF documents; Fully support all
add links to pdf online; active links in pdf
13 
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
While no longer directly involved in ALEC, both CCA and GEO Group were 
previously involved with the organization at a time when it worked with members to 
draft model legislation impacting sentencing policy and prison privatization. CCA’s 
involvement in the 1990s went as far as chairing the ALEC Criminal Justice Task 
Force and having its senior director of business development serve as the private 
sector task force chair when a series of tough-on-crime proposals were drafted.
77, 78
CCA and Wackenhut (GEO) were acknowledged by ALEC in 1999 for their 
substantial contributions to the organization.
79
ALEC’s past model policies have included mandatory minimum sentences, three 
strikes laws, and truth-in-sentencing, all of which contribute to higher prison 
populations.
80, 81
More recently, ALEC has been assisting with legislation that could 
increase the number of people held in immigration detention facilities.
82
Although 
specific information on bills concerning criminal justice is unavailable, ALEC claims 
that member lawmakers introduce an average of 1,000 bills based at least in part on 
the group’s model legislation every year. About 20 percent of these bills end up being 
enacted, although the proportion fell closer to 14 percent in 2009.
83,
84
Private prison companies are also known to spend heavily on independent lobbying, 
as well as on direct contributions to both state and federal candidates. CCA has 
spent an average of nearly $1.4 million per year since 1999 on in-house lobbying, as 
well as through high-profile lobbying firms such as Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & 
Feld LLP and McBee Strategic Consulting.
85,
86
In addition, CCA actively lobbies 
state officials, employing an average of 70 state-based lobbyists per year throughout 
the United States since 2003.
87
These lobbying efforts have gone toward promoting 
the use of private prisons, increasing the nation’s prison population, such as through 
strict immigration laws, and have also been used to block unfavorable bills, such as 
those that would put private prisons under the jurisdiction of the Freedom of 
Information Act or ban private prisons entirely.
88, 89
14 
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
CCA Funds Spent on Federal Lobbying
90
Since 2004 CCA’s political action committee has given an average of over $130,000 
per election cycle to federal candidates and their political action committees (PACs). 
CCA has traditionally favored giving to Republicans, but Democrats have received 
about 20 percent of CCA’s federal contributions during this period. Private prison 
companies have also spent heavily on contributions to Republican and Democratic 
organizations such as the Republican Governors Association, the Republican State 
Leadership Committee, and the Democratic Governors Association. CCA’s 
contributions to these groups have averaged over $80,000 per election cycle, with 
more than 80 percent going to the Republican Party.
91
Company officials have also 
made individual contributions to federal elected officials. For example, the 14 CCA 
board members have given nearly $43,000 each over the past four election cycles.
92, 93 
CCA contributed an average of nearly $190,000 to state party organizations per 
election cycle since 2004. As with other contributions, the majority has gone toward 
Republicans (nearly 75 percent) and has been primarily aimed at states such as 
Florida and California. From 2003 to 2011 the Florida GOP received nearly 
$320,000, while the California GOP received over $140,000. The Democratic 
counterparts in these states received $73,500 and $55,000, respectively. 
94
CCA also 
spent over $150,000 during this period on efforts to either promote or defeat ballot 
measures. These referenda mostly focused on increasing state revenue, and spending. 
However, CCA also supported proposals to implement harsher criminal penalties, 
15 
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
make prosecutions easier, and eliminate bail for illegal immigrants charged with 
violent or gang-related felonies.
95, 96
Lobbying in California 
States vary in the amount of information they make available on lobbying, making it 
impossible to know exactly how much groups like CCA are spending and the issues 
in which they focus. However, California provides complete lobbying reports online, 
showing that CCA has spent an average of over $150,000 per year since 2001 
lobbying the governor’s office, legislature, Department of Corrections and 
Rehabilitation, Legislative Analyst’s Office, Department of Finance, Office of 
Planning and Research, Youth and Adult Correctional Agency, and Department of 
General Services.
97
The issues in which CCA is engaged include budgets, prison 
construction, youth facilities, out-of-state prison bed programs, the limitation of 
judicial discretion in sentencing, legislation that would require inmate approval 
before sending them out of state, and another bill that would outlaw private prisons 
entirely.
98
Although just one piece of the puzzle, California provides some context 
for CCA’s involvement in the 32 states in which it has lobbied between 2001 and 
2011.
99
On the state level CCA has given an average of over $430,000 per election cycle, 
with nearly 70 percent going toward Republican candidates. Since 2003, the states 
receiving the largest amount of these funds have been California ($502,000), Florida 
($438,000), Georgia ($241,000), Idaho ($93,000), Tennessee ($70,000), New Mexico 
($62,000), and Louisiana ($50,000). Texas Governor Rick Perry, Idaho Governor 
C.L. “Butch” Otter, Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal, and three influential Georgia 
state lawmakers, of which at least one was involved in crafting harsh immigration 
legislation, received the most individual contributions from 2003 to 2011. The 
contributions made to these officials ranged from $10,800 to $20,000 each.
100, 101 
16 
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
CCA State and Federal Contributions by Election Cycle
102, 103, 104 
The potential for a more sinister relationship between private prison companies and 
public officials was revealed in 2010 and 2011 when two former juvenile court judges 
in Pennsylvania were ensnared in the notorious Luzerne County “kids for cash” 
scandal. The judges were convicted of playing a role in shutting down a public 
juvenile detention center and steering defendants to new private facilities in exchange 
for millions of dollars in kickbacks.
105
They are now both serving lengthy prison 
sentences. This extreme example highlights how the incentives of private prisons can 
lead to questionable actions taken at the expense of those coming into contact with 
the justice system.
This commingling of money and influence, while troubling, is not unique in 
American politics and public policy. However, what makes this particular instance 
noteworthy is that private prison companies use their influence to increase profits by 
taking advantage of and continuing the nation’s longstanding reliance on 
incarceration. 
17 
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
CO NC L U S I O N  
Results vary somewhat, but when inconsistencies and research errors are adjusted the 
savings associated with investing in private prisons appear dubious. Even minimal 
savings are far from guaranteed, and many studies claiming otherwise have been 
criticized for their methodology. The available data belies the oft-claimed economic 
benefits of private contracting, and points to the practice being an unreliable 
approach toward financial stability. 
Even if private prisons can manage to hold down costs, this success often comes at 
the detriment of services provided. Nationwide, public funds for prisons are already 
limited, leaving little excess spending that can be cut. Therefore, private prisons must 
make cuts in important high-cost areas such as staff, training, and programming to 
create savings.
106
The pressure that companies feel to maintain low overhead costs 
combined with less direct oversight are likely what led researchers at the University 
of Utah to conclude that, “quality of services is not improved” in private prisons.
107
Finally, private prison companies’ dependence on ensuring a large prison population 
to maintain profits provides inappropriate incentives to lobby government officials 
for policies that will place more people in prison. This is evidenced by the creation 
and coordination of model legislation through conservative lobbying groups, as well 
as in the political contributions and lobbying efforts of individual companies. This 
effort to increase reliance on incarceration comes at a time where America’s rate of 
imprisonment is the highest in the world and when the prison population is far 
beyond the point of diminishing returns in terms of public safety. 
The available evidence does not point to any substantial benefits to privatizing 
prisons. Although there are instances where private prisons result in small savings, 
the structure and demands of for-profit prisons appear to produce a negative overall 
impact on services. In order to reconcile this information with the continued claims 
that private prisons are superior, one must assume that these contentions are 
couched more in ideology than in facts. 
18 
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE | PRIVATE PRISONS IN AMERICA 
1
Guerino, P., Harrison, P.M., & Sabol, P.M. (2011). Prisoners in 2010. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics. 
Available online here: http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/pub/pdf/p10.pdf
2
Beck, A.J. (2000). Prisoners in 1999. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics; Guerino, P., Harrison, P.M., & 
Sabol, P.M. (2011). Prisoners in 2010. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics. Prisoners in 1999 available 
online here: http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/pub/pdf/p99.pdf
3
Meskell, A.W. (1999). An American resolution: The history of prisons in the United States from 1777 to 1877. 
Stanford Law Review, 51(4), 839-865. Available online here: 
http://www.thefreelibrary.com/An+American+resolution%3A+the+history+of+prisons+in+the+United+States...-
a0544943
17
4
Ibid  
5
Dolovich, S. (2005). State punishment and private prisons. Duke Law Journal, 55(3), 437-546. 
6
Harding, R. (2001). Private prisons. Crime and Justice, 28, 265-346. 
7
Kirchhoff, S.M. (2010). Economic impacts of prison growth. Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service. 
Available online here: http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R41
17
7.pdf
8
Harding, R. (2001). Private prisons. Crime and Justice, 28, 265-346. 
9
McDonald, D.C. (1992). Private Penal Institutions. Crime and Justice, 16, 361-419. 
10
Mattera, P. & Khan, M. (with LeRoy, G., & Davis, K.). (2001). Jail breaks: Economic development subsidies given to 
private prisons. Washington, DC: Good Jobs First. Available online here: 
http://www.goodjobsfirst.org/sites/default/files/docs/pdf/jailbreaks.pdf
11
Mattera, P., Khan, M., & Nathan, S. (2003). Corrections Corporation of America: A critical look at its first twenty 
years. Charlotte, North Carolina: Grassroots Leadership. Available online here: 
http://www.grassrootsleadership.org/_publications/CCAAnniversaryReport.pdf
12
Hartney, C. & Glesmann, C. (2011). Responding to the growth of the private prison industry in the United States. 
Oakland, California: National Council on Crime and Delinquency. 
13
Cohn, S. (2011, October 18). Private prison industry grows despite critics. MSNBC.com. Available here: 
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/44936562/ns/business-cnbc_tv/t/private-prison-industry-grows-despite-
critics/#.TrKmFPSsc80
14
Greene, J. (2000). Prison privatization: recent developments in the United States. Toronto, Canada: Center on 
Crime, Communities & Culture. Available online here: 
http://archive.epinet.org/real_media/010111/materials/greene2.pdf
15
Harrison, P.M. & Beck, A.J. (2004). Prisoners in 2003. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics. Available 
online here: http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/pub/pdf/p03.pdf
16
Private prison set to open in February. (1999, September 13). Portsmouth Daily Times. Available online here: 
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=D-
NbAAAAIBAJ&sjid=DVMNAAAAIBAJ&pg=2728,3978340&dq=private+prison+set+to+open+in+february&hl=en
17
Cheung, A. (2004). Prison privatization and the use of incarceration. Washington, DC: The Sentencing Project. 
Available online here: http://www.sentencingproject.org/doc/publications/inc_prisonprivatization.pdf
18
A terrible idea. (2008, September 14). Las Vegas Sun. Available online here: 
http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2008/sep/14/terrible-idea/
19
Dillion, J. (2004, January 2). Private prison company to house 700 Vermont inmates. Vermont Public Radio. 
Available online here: http://www.vpr.net/news_detail/70230/
20
The GEO Group announces contract cancellations for three community correctional facilities in California. Retrieved 
December 20, 2011 from http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=91331&p=irol-
newsArticle&ID=1583791&highlight=
21
Haughney, K. (2011, August 26). Prison privatization to process despite resignation of Ed Buss. Orlando Sentinel. 
Available online here: http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2011-08-26/news/fl-prison-privatization-buss-issues-
20110825_1_prison-privatization-privatization-process-privatization-debate
22
Ortega, B. (2011, August 19). Coolidge voices desire to land new prison. The Arizona Republic. Available online 
here: http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2011/08/19/20110819arizona-prisons-coolidge-voice-desire-new-
prison.html
23
Love, N. (2011, October 17). New Hampshire to seek bids for private prisons. Bloomberg Businessweek. Available 
online here: http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D9QE2V2O0.htm
24
Hartney, C. & Glesmann, C. (2011). Responding to the growth of the private prison industry in the United States. 
Oakland, California: National Council on Crime and Delinquency. 
25
Beck, A.J. (2000). Prisoners in 1999. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics; Beck, A.J. & Harrison, P.M. 
(2001). Prisoners in 2000. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics; Harrison, P.M. & Beck, A.J. (2002). Prisoners 
in 2001. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics; Harrison, P.M. & Beck, A.J. (2003). Prisoners in 2002. 
Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics; Harrison, P.M. & Beck, A.J. (2004). Prisoners in 2003. Washington, DC: 
Bureau of Justice Statistics; Harrison, P.M. & Beck, A.J. (2005). Prisoners in 2004. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice 
Statistics; Harrison, P.M. & Beck, A.J. (2006). Prisoners in 2005. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics; Sabol, 
W.J., Couture, H. & Harrison, P.M. (2007). Prisoners in 2006. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics; West, 
H.C., & Sabol, W.J. (2008). Prisoners in 2007. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics; Sabol, W.J., West, H.C., & 
Cooper, M. (2009). Prisoners in 2008. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics; West, H.C., Sabol, W.J., & 
Greenman, S.J. (2010). Prisoners in 2009. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics; Guerino, P., Harrison, P.M., 
& Sabol, P.M. (2011). Prisoners in 2010. Washington, DC: Bureau of Justice Statistics. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested