pdf annotation in c# : Convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks software application dll winforms html asp.net web forms 03217196111-part1670

 Table of Contents
Chapter 10  Formatting Text with Styles
 .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 
241
Choosing a Font Family.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  243
Specifying Alternate Fonts .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  244
Creating Italics .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  246
Applying Bold Formatting  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  248
Setting the Font Size  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  250
Setting the Line Height .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  255
Setting All Font Values at Once .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  256
Setting the Color   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  258
Changing the Text’s Background  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  260
Controlling Spacing .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  264
Adding Indents   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  265
Setting White Space Properties .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  266
Aligning Text .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  268
Changing the Text Case  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  270
Using Small Caps  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .271
Decorating Text  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  272
Chapter 11  Layout with Styles
 .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .   
275
Considerations When Beginning a Layout .  .  .  .  .  .  .  276
Structuring Your Pages .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  279
Styling HTML5 Elements in Older Browsers .  .  .  .  .  .  286
Resetting or Normalizing Default Styles  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  290
The Box Model.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  292
Changing the Background .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  294
Setting the Height or Width for an Element   .  .  .  .  .  .  298
Setting the Margins around an Element   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  302
Adding Padding around an Element.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  304
Making Elements Float .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  306
Controlling Where Elements Float.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  308
Setting the Border.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 311
Offsetting Elements in the Natural Flow  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .314
Positioning Elements Absolutely  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .316
Positioning Elements in 3D .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .318
Determining How to Treat Overflow.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  320
Aligning Elements Vertically .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  322
Changing the Cursor  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  323
Displaying and Hiding Elements.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  324
Convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf hyperlinks; change link in pdf
Convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add a link to a pdf; add links to pdf acrobat
Table of Contents  xi
Chapter 12  Style Sheets for Mobile to Desktop
 .  .  .  .  .  .  .    
327
Mobile Strategies and Considerations  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  328
Understanding and Implementing Media Queries.  .  .  333
Building a Page that Adapts with Media Queries  .  .  .  340
Chapter 13  Working with Web Fonts
 .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .    
353
What Is a Web Font?.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  354
Where to Find Web Fonts.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  356
Downloading Your First Web Font.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  358
Working with 
@font-face
 .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  360
Styling Web Fonts and Managing File Size.  .  .  .  .  .  .  365
Chapter 14  Enhancements with CSS3
 .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 
371
Understanding Vendor Prefixes .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  373
A Quick Look at Browser Compatibility.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  375
Using Polyfills for Progressive Enhancement  .  .  .  .  .  376
Rounding the Corners of Elements  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  378
Adding Drop Shadows to Text .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  382
Adding Drop Shadows to Other Elements  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  384
Applying Multiple Backgrounds .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  388
Using Gradient Backgrounds   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  390
Setting the Opacity of Elements .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  394
Chapter 15  Lists
 .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .    
397
Creating Ordered and Unordered Lists.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  398
Choosing Your Markers.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .401
Choosing Where to Start List Numbering.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  403
Using Custom Markers .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  404
Controlling Where Markers Hang .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  406
Setting All List-Style Properties at Once  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  407
Styling Nested Lists .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  408
Creating Description Lists  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .412
Chapter 16  Forms
 .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 
417
Creating Forms   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .419
Processing Forms .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .421
Sending Form Data via Email.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .   424
Organizing the Form Elements.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  426
Creating Text Boxes.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  428
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Available zoom setting (fit page, fit width). .NET component to convert adobe PDF file to html viewer.
pdf reader link; add hyperlinks to pdf online
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links. Our PDF to HTML converter library control is a 100% clean .NET which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML
add links in pdf; add link to pdf file
xii  Table of Contents
Creating Password Boxes  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .431
Creating Email, Telephone, and URL Boxes  .  .  .  .  .  .  432
Labeling Form Parts .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  434
Creating Radio Buttons .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  436
Creating Select Boxes   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  438
Creating Checkboxes .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  440
Creating Text Areas .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .441
Allowing Visitors to Upload Files  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  442
Creating Hidden Fields .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  443
Creating a Submit Button.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  444
Using an Image to Submit a Form .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  446
Disabling Form Elements.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .447
New HTML5 Features and Browser Support.  .  .  .  .  .  448
Chapter 17  Video, Audio, and Other Multimedia
 .  .  .  .  .  .   
449
Third-Party Plugins and Going Native.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .451
Video File Formats  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  452
Adding a Single Video to Your Web Page  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  453
Exploring Video Attributes .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  454
Adding Controls and Autoplay to Your Video  .  .  .  .  .  455
Looping a Video and Specifying a Poster Image  .  .  .  457
Preventing a Video from Preloading   .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  458
Using Video with Multiple Sources  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  459
Multiple Media Sources and the Source Element  .  .  .  460
Adding Video with Hyperlink Fallbacks.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .461
Adding Video with Flash Fallbacks  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  463
Providing Accessibility  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  467
Adding Audio File Formats .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  468
Adding a Single Audio File to Your Web Page .  .  .  .  .  469
Adding a Single Audio File with Controls to Your  
Web Page  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  470
Exploring Audio Attributes .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 471
Adding Controls and Autoplay to Audio in a Loop.  .  .  472
Preloading an Audio File .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .473
Providing Multiple Audio Sources .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .474
Adding Audio with Hyperlink Fallbacks .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .475
Adding Audio with Flash Fallbacks  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .476
Adding Audio with Flash and a Hyperlink Fallback  .  .  .478
Getting Multimedia Files .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  480
Considering Digital Rights Management (DRM) .  .  .  .  .481
Embedding Flash Animation .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  482
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET Able to replace all PDF page contents in VB.NET
add url pdf; adding links to pdf
VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in
svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET an easy work and gives quick access to PDF page and
adding an email link to a pdf; pdf link to attached file
Table of Contents  xiii
Embedding YouTube Video                                               484
Using Video with Canvas                                                   485
Coupling Video with SVG                                                   486
Further Resources                                                               487
Chapter 18  Tables
489
Structuring Tables                                                                490
Spanning Columns and Rows                                            494
Chapter 19  Working with Scripts
497
Loading an External Script                                                 499
Adding an Embedded Script                                              502
JavaScript Events                                                                503
Chapter 20  Testing & Debugging Web Pages
505
Trying Some Debugging Techniques                               506
Checking the Easy Stuff: General                                     508
Checking the Easy Stuff: HTML                                          510
Checking the Easy Stuff: CSS                                             512
Validating Your Code                                                           514
Testing Your Page                                                                516
When Images Don’t Appear                                                519
Still Stuck?                                                                             520
Chapter 21  Publishing Your Pages on the Web
521
Getting Your Own Domain Name                                      522
Finding a Host for Your Site                                               523
Transferring Files to the Server                                         525
Index
529
Bonus chapters mentioned in this eBook are  
available after the index.
Appendix A 
A1
Appendix B 
B1
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
Able to convert PDF documents into other formats (multipage TIFF, JPEG, etc Include extraction of text, hyperlinks, bookmarks and metadata; Advanced document
add links to pdf; add links to pdf file
PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
with advanced capabilities, such as text extraction, hyperlinks, bookmarks and easy-to-use interface enabling you to quickly convert your PDF images into
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; change link in pdf file
This page intentionally left blank 
Introduction  xv
Introduction
Whether you are just beginning your ven-
ture into building Web sites or have built 
some before but want to ensure that your 
knowledge is current, you’ve come along 
at a very exciting time in the industry.
How we code and style pages, the brows-
ers in which we view the pages, and the 
devices on which we view the  browsers 
have all advanced substantially the past 
few years. Once limited to browsing the 
Web from our desktop computers or lap-
tops, we can now take the Web with us on 
any number of devices: phones, tablets, 
and, yes, laptops and desktops, and more.
Which is as it should be, because the 
Web’s promise has always been the 
dissolution of boundaries—the power 
to share and access information freely 
from any metropolis, rural community, 
or anywhere in between, from any Web-
enabled device. In short, the Web’s prom-
ise lies in its universality. And the Web’s 
reach continues to expand as technology 
finds its ways to communities that were 
once shut out.
Adding to the Web’s greatness is that 
anyone is free to create and launch a site. 
This book shows you how. It is ideal for 
the beginner with no knowledge of HTML 
or CSS who wants to begin to create Web 
pages. You’ll find clear, easy-to-follow 
instructions that take you through the 
process of creating pages step by step. 
Lastly, the book is a helpful guide to keep 
handy. You can look up topics in the table 
of contents or index and consult just those 
subjects about which you need more 
information.
xvi  Introduction
HTML and CSS in Brief
At the root of the Web’s success is a 
simple, text-based markup language that 
is easy to learn and that any device with a 
basic Web browser can read: HTML. Every 
Web page requires at least some HTML; it 
wouldn’t be a Web page without it.
As you will learn in greater detail as you 
move through this book, HTML is used to 
define your content’s meaning, and CSS is 
used to define how your content and Web 
page will look. Both HTML pages and CSS 
files (style sheets) are text files, making 
them easy to edit. You can see snippets of 
HTML and CSS in “How This Book Works,” 
near the end of this introduction.
You’ll dive into learning a basic HTML page 
right off the bat in Chapter 1, and you’ll 
begin to learn how to style your pages with 
CSS in Chapter 7. See “What this book will 
teach you” for an overview of all the chap-
ters and a summary of the topics covered.
What is HTML5?
It helps to know some basics about the 
origins of HTML in order to understand 
HTML5. HTML began in the early 1990s as 
a short document that detailed a handful of 
elements used to build Web pages. Many 
of those elements were for describing Web 
page content such as headings, para-
graphs, and lists. HTML’s version number 
has increased as the language has evolved 
with the introduction of other elements and 
adjustments to its rules. The most current 
version is HTML5.
HTML5 is a natural evolution of earlier 
versions of HTML and strives to reflect 
the needs of both current and future Web 
sites. It inherits the vast majority of features 
from its predecessors, meaning that if you 
coded HTML before HTML5 came on the 
scene, you already know a lot of HTML5. 
This also means that much of HTML5 
works in both old and new browsers; being 
backward compatible is a key design 
principle of HTML5 (see www.w3.org/TR/
html-design-principles/).
HTML5 also adds a bevy of new features. 
Many are straightforward, such as addi-
tional elements (
article
section
figure
and many more) that are used to describe 
content. Others are quite complex and 
aid in creating powerful Web applications. 
You’ll need to have a firm grasp of creat-
ing Web pages before you can graduate to 
the more complicated features that HTML5 
provides. HTML5 also introduces native 
audio and video playback to your Web 
pages, which the book also covers.
What is CSS3?
The first version of CSS didn’t exist until 
after HTML had been around for a few 
years, becoming official in 1996. Like 
HTML5 and its relationship to earlier ver-
sions of HTML, CSS3 is a natural extension 
of the versions of CSS that preceded it.
CSS3 is more powerful than earlier ver-
sions of CSS and introduces numerous 
visual effects, such as drop shadows, text 
shadows, rounded corners, and gradients. 
(See “What this book will teach you” for 
details of what’s covered.)
Web standards and specifications
You might be wondering who created 
HTML and CSS in the first place, and who 
continues to evolve them. The World Wide 
Web Consortium (W3C)—directed by the 
inventor of the Web and HTML, Tim Bern-
ers-Lee—is the organization responsible for 
shepherding the development of Web stan-
dards. Specifications (or specs, for short) 
are documents that define the parameters 
Introduction  xvii
of languages like HTML and CSS. In other 
words, specs standardize the rules. Follow 
the W3C’s activity at www.w3.org 
A
.
For a variety of reasons, another organi-
zation—the Web Hypertext Application 
Technology Working Group (WHATWG, 
found at www.whatwg.org)—is developing 
the HTML5 specification. The W3C incor-
porates WHATWG’s work into its official 
version of the in-progress spec.
With standards in place, we can build our 
pages from the agreed-upon set of rules, 
and browsers—like Chrome, Firefox, Inter-
net Explorer (IE), Opera, and Safari—can be 
built to display our pages with those rules 
in mind. (On the whole, browsers imple-
ment the standards well. Older versions of 
IE, especially IE6, have some issues.
Specifications go through several stages of 
development before they are considered 
final, at which point they are dubbed a 
Recommendation (www.w3.org/2005/10/
Process-20051014/tr).
Parts of the HTML5 and CSS3 specs are still 
being finalized, but that doesn’t mean you 
can’t use them. It just takes time (literally 
years) for the standardization process to 
run its course. Browsers begin to implement 
a spec’s features long before it becomes 
a Recommendation, because that informs 
the spec development process itself. So 
browsers already include a wide variety of 
features in HTML5 and CSS3, even though 
they aren’t Recommendations yet.
On the whole, the features covered in this 
book are well entrenched in their respec-
tive specs, so the risk of their changing 
prior to becoming a Recommendation 
is minimal. Developers have been using 
many HTML5 and CSS3 features for some 
time. So can you.
The W3C site is the industry’s primary source of 
Web-standards specifications.
xviii  Introduction
Progressive 
Enhancement: 
A Best Practice
I began the introduction by speaking of the 
universality of the Web—the notion that 
information on the Web should be accessi-
ble to all. Progressive enhancement helps 
you build sites with universality in mind. It 
is not a language, rather it’s an approach 
to building sites that Steve Champeon cre-
ated in 2003 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Progressive_enhancement).
The idea is simple but powerful: Start your 
site with HTML content and behavior that 
is accessible to all visitors 
A
. To the same 
page, add your design with CSS
B
and 
add additional behavior with JavaScript, 
typically loading them from external files 
(you’ll learn how to do this).
The result is that devices and browsers 
capable of accessing basic pages will get 
the simplified, default experience; devices 
and browsers capable of viewing more-
robust sites will see the enhanced version. 
The experience on your site doesn’t have 
to be the same for everyone, as long as 
your content is accessible. In essence, the 
idea behind progressive enhancement is 
that everyone wins.
A basic HTML page with no custom CSS 
applied to it. This page may not look great, but 
the information is accessible—and that’s what’s 
important. Even browsers from near the inception 
of the Web more than 20 years ago can display 
this page; so too can the oldest of mobile phones 
with Web browsers. And screen readers, software 
that reads Web pages aloud to visually impaired 
visitors, will be able to navigate it easily.
Introduction  xix
This book teaches you how to build pro-
gressively enhanced sites even if it doesn’t 
always explicitly call that out while doing 
so. It’s a natural result of the best practices 
imparted throughout the book.
However, Chapters 12 and 14 do address 
progressive enhancement head on. Take 
an early peek at those if you’re interested 
in seeing how the principle of progres-
sive enhancement helps you build a site 
that adapts its layout based on a device’s 
screen size and browser capabilities, or 
how older browsers will display simplified 
designs while modern browsers will display 
ones enhanced with CSS3 effects.
Progressive enhancement is a key best 
practice that is at the heart of building sites 
for everyone.
The same page as viewed in a browser 
that supports CSS. It’s the same information, 
just presented differently. Users with more 
capable devices and browsers get an enhanced 
experience when visiting the page.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested