pdf annotation in c# : Add hyperlinks pdf file control SDK system azure .net wpf console 03217196112-part1671

xx  Introduction
Is This Book for You?
This book assumes no prior knowledge 
of building Web sites. So in that sense, it 
is for the absolute beginner. You will learn 
both HTML and CSS from the ground up. In 
the course of doing so, you will also learn 
about features that are new in HTML5 and 
CSS3, with an emphasis on the ones that 
designers and developers are using today 
in their daily work.
But even if you are familiar with HTML and 
CSS, you still stand to learn from this book, 
especially if you want to get up to speed 
on much of the latest in HTML5, CSS3, and 
best practices.
What this book will teach you
We’ve added approximately 125 pages 
to this book since the previous edition in 
order to bring you as much material as 
possible. (The very first edition of the book, 
published in 1996, had 176 pages total.) 
We’ve also made substantial updates to (or 
done complete rewrites of) nearly every 
previous page. In short, this Seventh Edi-
tion represents a major revision.
The chapters are organized like so:
Chapters 1 through 6 and 15 through 18 
cover the principles of creating HTML 
pages and the range of HTML elements 
at your disposal, clearly demonstrating 
when and how to use each one.
Chapters 7 through 14 dive into CSS, 
all the way from creating your first style 
rule to applying enhanced visual effects 
with CSS3.
Chapter 19 shows you how to add pre-
written JavaScript to your pages.
Chapter 20 tells you how to test and 
debug your pages before putting them 
on the Web.
Chapter 21 explains how to secure your 
own domain name and then publish 
your site on the Web for all to see.
Expanding on that, some of the topics 
include:
Creating, saving, and editing HTML and 
CSS files.
What it means to write semantic HTML 
and why it is important.
How to separate your page’s content 
(that is, your HTML) from its presenta-
tion (that is, your CSS)—a key aspect of 
progressive enhancement.
Structuring your content in a meaningful 
way by using HTML elements that have 
been around for years and ones that 
are new in HTML5.
Improving your site’s accessibility with 
ARIA landmark roles and other good 
coding practices.
Adding images to your pages and opti-
mizing them for the Web.
Linking from one Web page to another 
page, or from one part of a page to 
another part.
Styling text (size, color, bold, italics, 
and more); adding background colors 
and images; and implementing a fluid, 
multi-column layout that can shrink 
and expand to accommodate different 
screen sizes.
Add hyperlinks pdf file - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
c# read pdf from url; add a link to a pdf in acrobat
Add hyperlinks pdf file - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding hyperlinks to pdf files; clickable links in pdf files
Introduction  xxi
What this book 
won’t
teach you
Alas, even after adding so many pages 
since the previous edition, there is so much 
to talk about when it comes to HTML and 
CSS that we had to leave out some topics.
With a couple of exceptions, we stuck 
to omitting items that you would have 
fewer occasions to use, are still subject to 
change, lack widespread browser sup-
port, require JavaScript knowledge, or are 
advanced subjects.
Some of the topics not covered include:
The HTML5 
details
summary
menu
command
, and 
keygen
elements.
The HTML5 
canvas
element, which 
allows you to draw graphics (and even 
create games) with JavaScript.
The HTML5 APIs and other advanced 
features that require JavaScript knowl-
edge or are otherwise not directly 
related to the new semantic HTML5 
elements.
CSS sprites. This technique involves 
combining more than one image 
into a single image, which is very 
helpful in minimizing the number of 
assets your pages need to load. See 
www.bruceontheloose.com/sprites/ for 
more information.
CSS image replacement. These tech-
niques are often paired with CSS 
sprites. See www.bruceontheloose 
.com/ir/ for more information.
CSS3 transforms, animations, and 
transitions.
CSS3’s new layout modules.
Leveraging new selectors in CSS3 
that allow you to target your styles in a 
wider range of ways than was previ-
ously possible.
Learning your options for addressing 
visitors on mobile devices.
Building a single site for all users—
whether they are using a mobile phone, 
tablet, laptop, desktop computer, or 
other Web-enabled device—based on 
many of the principles of responsive 
web design, some of which leverage 
CSS3 media queries.
Adding custom Web fonts to your 
pages with 
@font-face
.
Using CSS3 effects such as opacity, 
background alpha transparency, gradi-
ents, rounded corners, drop shadows, 
shadows inside elements, text shad-
ows, and multiple background images.
Building forms to solicit input from your 
visitors, including using some of the 
new form input types in HTML5.
Including media in your pages with the 
HTML5 
audio
and 
video
elements.
And more.
These topics are complemented by many 
dozens of code samples that show you 
how to implement the features based on 
best practices in the industry.
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Export PDF images to HTML images. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF;
convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks; adding hyperlinks to pdf documents
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Add necessary references: This professional .NET solution that is designed to convert PDF file to HTML web page
pdf links; add hyperlink pdf file
xxii  Introduction
How This Book Works
Nearly every section of the book contains 
practical code examples that demonstrate 
real-world use (
A
and 
B
). Typically, they 
are coupled with screen shots that show 
the results of the code when you view the 
Web page in a browser 
C
.
Most of the screen shots are of the lat-
est version of Firefox that was available 
at the time. However, this doesn’t imply 
a recommendation of Firefox over any 
other browser. The code samples will look 
very similar in any of the latest versions 
of Chrome, Internet Explorer, Opera, or 
Safari. As you will learn in Chapter 20, you 
should test your pages in a wide range of 
browsers before putting them on the Web, 
...
<body>
<header role="banner">
...
<nav role="navigation">
<ul class="nav">
  <li><a href="/" class="current">home</a></li>
  <li><a href="/about/">about</a></li>
  <li><a href="/resources/">resources</a></li>
  <li><a href="/archives/">archives</a></li>
</ul>
</nav>
...
</header>
...
</body>
</html>
You’ll find a snippet of HTML code on many pages, with the pertinent sections highlighted. An ellipsis (
...
 
represents additional code or content that was omitted for brevity. Often, the omitted portion is shown in a 
different code figure.
because there’s no telling what browsers 
your visitors will use.
The code and screen shots are accompa-
nied by descriptions of the HTML elements 
or CSS properties in question, both to give 
the samples context and to increase your 
understanding of them.
In many cases, you may find that the 
descriptions and code samples are enough 
for you to start using the HTML and CSS 
features. But if you need explicit guidance 
on how to use them, step-by-step instruc-
tions are always provided.
Finally, most sections contain tips that 
relay additional usage information, best 
practices, references to related parts of the 
book, links to relevant resources, and more.
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
all PDF page contents in VB.NET, including text, image, hyperlinks, etc. Add necessary references to replace a PDF page with PDF page from other PDF file using VB
pdf email link; add links to pdf document
VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in
PDF document is an easy work and gives quick access to PDF page and file, or even hyperlinks. How to VB.NET: Create Thumbnail for PDF. Add necessary references:
add hyperlink to pdf; accessible links in pdf
Introduction  xxiii
Conventions used in this book
The book uses the following conventions:
The word HTML is all encompassing, 
representing the language in general. 
HTML5 is used when referring to that 
specific version of HTML, such as when 
discussing a feature that is new in 
HTML5 and doesn’t exist in previous 
versions of HTML. The same approach 
applies to usage of the terms CSS (gen-
eral) and CSS3 (specific to CSS3).
Text or code that is a placeholder for a 
value you would create yourself is itali-
cized. Most placeholders appear in the 
step-by-step instructions. For example, 
“Or type 
#rrggbb
, where 
rrggbb
is the 
color’s hexadecimal representation.”
Code that you should actually type or 
that represents HTML or CSS code 
appears in 
this
font
.
An arrow (
) in a code figure indicates 
a continuation of the previous line—the 
line has been wrapped to fit in the 
book’s column 
B
. The arrow is not part 
of the code itself, so it’s not something 
you would type. Instead, type the line 
continuously, as if it had not wrapped to 
another line.
The first occurrence of a word is itali-
cized when it is defined.
IE is often used as a popular abbrevia-
tion of Internet Explorer. For instance, 
IE9 is synonymous with Internet 
Explorer 9.
Whenever a plus sign (+) follows a 
browser version number, it means the 
version listed plus subsequent versions. 
For instance, Firefox 8+ refers to Firefox 
8.0 and all versions after it.
If CSS code is relevant to the example, it is 
shown in its own box, with the pertinent sections 
highlighted.
/* Site Navigation */
.nav li {
float: left;
font-size: .75em; /* makes the  
bullets smaller */
}
.nav li a {
font-size: 1.5em;
}
.nav li:first-child {
list-style: none;
padding-left: 0;
}
Screen shots of one or more browsers 
demonstrate how the code affects the page.
PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
with advanced capabilities, such as text extraction, hyperlinks, bookmarks and NET Imaging SDK, you may add it on you to quickly convert your PDF images into
chrome pdf from link; adding a link to a pdf
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
by this .NET Imaging PDF Reader Add-on. Include extraction of text, hyperlinks, bookmarks and metadata; Annotate and redact in PDF documents; Fully support all
pdf link to specific page; adding hyperlinks to pdf
Companion Web Site
The book’s site, at www.bruceontheloose 
.com/htmlcss/, contains the table of 
contents, every complete code example 
featured in the book (plus some additional 
ones that wouldn’t fit), links to resources 
cited in the book (as well as additional 
ones), information about references used 
during writing, a list of errata, and more.
The site also includes reference sections 
(Appendixes A and B) that we didn’t have 
room to include in the book. These are 
handy for quickly looking up HTML ele-
ments and attributes or CSS properties and 
values. (They also contain some informa-
tion not covered in the book.)
You can find the code examples at www 
.bruceontheloose.com/htmlcss/examples/. 
You can browse them from there or down-
load them to your computer—all the HTML 
and CSS files are yours for the taking.
In some cases, I’ve included additional 
comments in the code to explain more 
about what it does or how to use it. A 
handful of the code samples in the book 
are truncated for space considerations, but 
the complete versions are on the book’s 
Web site. Please feel free to use the code 
as you please, modifying it as needed for 
your own projects.
The URLs for some of the key pages on the 
book’s site follow:
Home page: www.bruceontheloose 
.com/htmlcss/
Code samples: www.bruceontheloose 
.com/htmlcss/examples/
Appendix A: HTML Reference:  
www.bruceontheloose.com/ref/html/
Appendix B: CSS Properties and Values:  
www.bruceontheloose.com/ref/css/
I hope you find the site helpful.
Video Training
Visual QuickStart Guides are now even 
more visual: Building on the success of the 
top-selling Visual QuickStart Guide books, 
Peachpit now offers Video QuickStarts. As 
a companion to this book, Peachpit offers 
more than an hour of short, task-based 
videos that will help you master HTML5’s 
top features and techniques; instead of just 
reading about how to use HTML5, you can 
watch it in action. It’s a great way to learn 
all the basics and some of the newer or 
more complex features of HTML5. Log on 
to the Peachpit site at www.peachpit.com/
register to register your book, and you’ll 
find a free streaming sample; purchasing 
the rest of the material is quick and easy.
xxiv  Introduction
This page intentionally left blank 
4
Text
In This Chapter
Starting a New Paragraph 
100
Adding Author Contact Information 
102
Creating a Figure 
104
Specifying Time 
106
Marking Important and Emphasized Text  110
Indicating a Citation or Reference 
112
Quoting Text 
113
Highlighting Text 
116
Explaining Abbreviations 
118
Defining a Term 
120
Creating Superscripts and Subscripts 
121
Noting Edits and Inaccurate Text 
124
Marking Up Code 
128
Using Preformatted Text 
130
Specifying Fine Print 
132
Creating a Line Break 
133
Creating Spans 
134
Other Elements 
136
Unless a site is heavy on videos or photo 
galleries, most content on Web pages is 
text. This chapter explains which HTML 
semantics are appropriate for different 
types of text, especially (but not solely) for 
text within a sentence or phrase.
For example, the 
em
element is specifically 
designed for indicating emphasized text, 
and the 
cite
element’s purpose is to cite 
works of art, movies, books, and more.
Browsers typically style many text ele-
ments differently than normal text. For 
instance, both the 
em
and 
cite
elements 
are italicized. Another element, 
code
which is specifically designed for format-
ting lines of code from a script or program, 
displays in a monospace font by default.
How content will look is irrelevant when 
deciding how to mark it up. So, you 
shouldn’t use 
em
or 
cite
just because you 
want to italicize text. That’s the job of CSS.
Instead, focus on choosing HTML elements 
that describe the content. If by default a 
browser styles it as you would yourself with 
CSS, that’s just a bonus. If not, just override 
the default formatting with your own CSS.
100  Chapter 4
Starting a New 
Paragraph
HTML does not recognize the returns or 
other extra white space that you enter in 
your text editor. To start a new paragraph 
in your Web page, you use the 
p
element 
(
A
and 
B
).
To begin a new paragraph:
1.  Type 
<p>
.
2.  Type the contents of the new 
paragraph.
3.  Type 
</p>
to end the paragraph.
...
<body>
<article>
<h1>Antoni Gaudí</h1>
<p>Many tourists are drawn to  
Barcelona to see Antoni Gaudí's  
incredible architecture.</p>
<p>Barcelona celebrated the 150th  
anniversary of Gaudí's birth in  
2002.</p>
<h2>La Casa Milà</h2>
<p>Gaudí's work was essentially useful.  
<span lang="es">La Casa Milà</span> is  
an apartment building and real people  
live there.</p>
<h2>La Sagrada Família</h2>
<p>The complicatedly named and curiously  
unfinished Expiatory Temple of the  
Sacred Family is the most visited  
building in Barcelona.</p>
</article>
</body>
</html>
Not surprisingly, 
p
is one of the most frequently 
used HTML elements.
Text  101
You can use styles to format paragraphs 
with a particular font, size, or color (and more). 
For details, consult Chapter 10.
To control the amount of space between 
lines, consult “Setting the Line Height” in 
Chapter 10. To control the amount of space 
after a paragraph, consult “Setting the Mar-
gins around an Element” or “Adding Padding 
around an Element,” both of which are in 
Chapter 11.
You can justify paragraph text or align 
it to the left, right, or center with CSS (see 
“Aligning Text” in Chapter 10).
Here you see the typical default rendering of 
paragraphs. As with all content elements, you have 
full control over the formatting with CSS.
102  Chapter 4
Adding Author 
Contact Information
You might think the 
address
element is 
for marking up a postal address, but it isn’t 
(except for one circumstance; see the tips). 
In fact, there isn’t an HTML element explic-
itly designed for that purpose.
Instead, 
address
defines the contact infor-
mation for the author, people, or organiza-
tion relevant to an HTML page (usually 
appearing at the end of the page, if at all) 
or part of a page, such as within a report or 
a news article (
A
and 
B
).
To provide the author’s 
contact information:
1.  If you want to provide author contact 
information for an 
article
, place the 
cursor within that 
article
. Alternatively, 
place the cursor within the 
body
(or, 
more commonly, the page-level 
footer
if you want to provide author contact 
information for the page at large.
2.  Type 
<address>
.
3.  Type the author’s email address, a link 
to a page with contact information, and 
so on.
4.  Type 
</address>
.
...
<body>
<article>
<h1>Museum Opens on the Waterfront</h1>
<p>The new art museum not only introduces  
a range of contemporary works to the  
city, it's part of larger development  
effort on the waterfront.</p>
... [rest of story content] ...
<!-- the article's footer with address  
information for the article -->
<footer>
<p>Tracey Wong has written for <cite> 
The Paper of Papers</cite> since  
receiving her MFA in art history 
three years ago.</p>
<address>
Email her at <a href="mailto: 
traceyw@thepaperofpapers.com"> 
traceyw@thepaperofpapers.com 
</a>.
</address>
</footer>
</article>
<!-- the page's footer with address  
information for the whole page -->
<footer>
<p><small>&copy; 2011 The Paper of  
Papers, Inc.</small></p>
<address>
Have a question or comment about the 
site? <a href="site-feedback.html"> 
Contact our Web team</a>.
</address>
</footer>
</body>
</html>
This page has two 
address
elements: one for 
the 
article
’s author and the other in a page-level 
footer
for the people who maintain the whole 
page. Note that the 
address
for the 
article
contains contact information only. Although the 
background information about Tracey Wong is also 
in the 
article
’s 
footer
, it’s outside the 
address
element.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested