pdf annotation in c# : Add hyperlink pdf control SDK platform web page wpf asp.net web browser 03217196116-part1675

Text  133
Creating a Line Break
Browsers automatically wrap text accord-
ing to the width of the block or window that 
contains content. It’s best to let content 
flow like this in most cases, but sometimes 
you’ll want to force a line break manually. 
You achieve this with the 
br
element.
To be sure, using 
br
is a last resort tactic 
because it mixes presentation with your 
HTML instead of leaving all display control 
to your CSS. For instance, never use 
br
to simulate spacing between paragraphs. 
Instead, mark up the two paragraphs with 
p
elements and define the spacing between 
the two with the CSS 
margin
property.
So, when might 
br
be OK? Well, the 
br
ele-
ment is suitable for creating line breaks in 
poems, in a street address (
A
and 
B
), and 
occasionally in other short lines of text that 
should appear one after another.
To insert a line break:
Type 
<br
/>
(or 
<br>
) where the line break 
should occur. There is no separate end 
br
tag because it’s what’s known as an empty 
(or void) element; it lacks content.
Typing br as either <br /> or <br> is 
perfectly valid in HTML5.
Styles can help you control the space 
between lines in a paragraph (see “Setting 
the Line Height” in Chapter 10) and between 
the paragraphs themselves (see “Setting the 
Margins around an Element” in Chapter 11).
The hCard microformat  
(http://microformats.org/wiki/hcard) is “for 
representing people, companies, organiza-
tions, and places” in a semantic manner that’s 
human- and machine-readable. You could use 
it to represent a street address instead of the 
provided example 
A
.
...
<body>
<p>53 North Railway Street<br />
Okotoks, Alberta<br />
Canada T1Q 4H5</p>
<p>53 North Railway Street <br />Okotoks,  
Alberta <br />Canada T1Q 4H5</p>
</body>
</html>
The same address appears twice, but I 
coded them a little differently for demonstration 
purposes. Remember that the returns in your code 
are always ignored, so both paragraphs display 
the same way 
B
. Also, you can code 
br
as either 
<br
/>
or 
<br>
in HTML5.
Each 
br
element forces the subsequent 
content to a new line.
Add hyperlink pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding hyperlinks to a pdf; accessible links in pdf
Add hyperlink pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlink in pdf; add links to pdf document
134  Chapter 4
Creating Spans
The 
span
element, like 
div
, has absolutely 
no semantic meaning. The difference is 
that 
span
is appropriate around a word or 
phrase only, whereas 
div
is for blocks of 
content (see “Creating Generic Containers” 
in Chapter 3).
span
is useful when you want to apply any 
of the following to a snippet of content for 
which HTML doesn’t provide an appropri-
ate semantic element:
Attributes, like 
class
dir
id
lang
title
, and more (
A
and 
B
)
Styling with CSS
Behavior with JavaScript
Because 
span
has no semantic meaning, 
use it as a last resort when no other ele-
ment will do.
...
<body>
<h1 lang="es">La Casa Milà</h1>
<p>Gaudí's work was essentially useful.  
<span lang="es">La Casa Milà</span> is  
an apartment building and <em>real people 
</em> live there.</p>
</body>
</html>
In this case, I want to specify the language of 
a portion of text, but there isn’t an HTML element 
whose semantics are a fit for “La Casa Milà” in the 
context of a sentence. The 
h1
that contains “La 
Casa Milà” before the paragraph is appropriate 
semantically because the text is the heading 
for the content that follows. So for the heading, 
I simply added the 
lang
attribute to the 
h1
rather than wrap a 
span
around the heading text 
unnecessarily for that purpose.
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. Hyperlink Edit. XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document
adding hyperlinks to pdf documents; add a link to a pdf file
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. Hyperlink Edit. XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF
c# read pdf from url; add link to pdf acrobat
Text  135
To add spans:
1.  Type 
<span
.
2.  If desired, type 
id="name"
, where 
name
uniquely identifies the spanned content.
3.  If desired, type 
class="name"
, where 
name
is the name of the class that the 
spanned content belongs to.
4.  If desired, type other attributes (such as 
dir
lang
, or 
title
) and their values.
5.  Type 
>
to complete the start 
span
tag.
6.  Create the content you wish to contain 
in the 
span
.
7.  Type 
</span>
.
span doesn’t have default format-
ting
B
, but just as with other HTML elements, 
you can apply your own with CSS (see Chap-
ters 10 and 11).
You may apply both a class and id attri-
bute to the same span element, although it’s 
more common to apply one or the other, if at 
all. The principal difference is that class is for 
a group of elements, whereas id is for identi-
fying individual, unique elements on a page.
Microformats often use span to attach 
semantic class names to content as a way of 
filling the gaps where HTML doesn’t provide a 
suitable semantic element. You can learn more 
about them at http://microformats.org.
The 
span
element has no default styling.
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Word to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
adding a link to a pdf; add link to pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Excel to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
add hyperlink in pdf; add links in pdf
136  Chapter 4
Other Elements
This section covers other elements that 
you can include within your text, but which 
typically have fewer occasions to be used 
or have limited browser support (or both).
The u element
Like 
b
i
s
, and 
small
, the 
u
element has 
been redefined in HTML5 to disassociate 
it from its past as a non-semantic, presen-
tational element. In those days, the 
u
ele-
ment was for underlining text. Now, it’s for 
unarticulated annotations. HTML5 defines 
it thus:
The 
u
element represents a span of 
text with an unarticulated, though 
explicitly rendered, non-textual anno-
tation, such as labeling the text as 
being a proper name in Chinese text 
(a Chinese proper name mark), or 
labeling the text as being misspelt.
Here is an example of how you could use 
u
to note misspelled words:
<p>When they <u class="spelling"> 
recieved</u> the package, they put  
it with <u class="spelling">there 
</u> other ones with the intention  
of opening them all later.</p>
The 
class
is entirely optional, and its 
value (which can be whatever you’d like) 
doesn’t render with the content to explicitly 
indicate a spelling error. But, you could 
use it to style misspelled words differently 
(though 
u
still renders as underlined text 
by default). Or, you could add a 
title
attribute with a note such as “[sic],” a con-
vention in some languages to indicate a 
misspelling.
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
accessible links in pdf; adding a link to a pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Please click to see details. PDF Hyperlink Edit. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document
pdf links; pdf link to attached file
Text  137
Use 
u
only when an element like 
cite
em
or 
mark
doesn’t fit your desired semantics. 
Also, it’s best to change its styling if 
u
text 
will be confused with linked text, which is 
also underlined by default
A
.
The wbr element
HTML5 introduces a cousin of 
br
called 
wbr
. It represents “a line break opportu-
nity.” Use it in between words or letters in 
a long, unbroken phrase (or, say, a URL) to 
indicate where it could wrap if necessary 
to fit the text in the available space in a 
readable fashion. So, unlike 
br
wbr
doesn’t 
force a wrap, it just lets the browser know 
where it can force a line break if needed.
Here are a couple of examples:
<p>They liked to say, 
"FriendlyFleasandFireFlies<wbr /> 
FriendlyFleasandFireFlies<wbr /> 
FriendlyFleasandFireFlies<wbr /> 
" as fast as they could over and  
over.</p>
<p>His favorite site is this<wbr 
/>is<wbr />a<wbr />really<wbr 
/>really<wbr />longurl.com.</p>
You can type 
wbr
as either 
<wbr
/>
or 
<wbr>
. As you might have guessed, you 
won’t find many occasions to use 
wbr
Additionally, browser support is incon-
sistent as of this writing. Although 
wbr
works in current versions of Chrome and 
Firefox, Internet Explorer and Opera simply 
ignoreit.
Like links, 
u
elements are underlined by 
default, which can cause confusion unless you 
change one or both with CSS.
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. C#.NET Sample Code: Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
clickable links in pdf from word; add hyperlink pdf
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Create signatures in existing PDF signature fields; Create signatures in new fields which hold the signature; Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit
adding an email link to a pdf; adding links to pdf document
138  Chapter 4
The rubyrp, and rt elements
ruby annotation  is a convention in East 
Asian languages, such as Chinese and Jap-
anese, typically used to show the pronun-
ciation of lesser-known characters. These 
small annotative characters appear either 
above or to the right of the characters they 
annotate. They are often called simply ruby  
or rubi, and the Japanese ruby characters 
are known as furigana .
The 
ruby
element, as well as its 
rt
and 
rp
child elements, is HTML5’s mechanism for 
adding them to your content. 
rt
speci-
fies the ruby characters that annotate the 
base characters. The optional 
rp
element 
allows you to display parentheses around 
the ruby text in browsers that don’t support 
ruby
.
The following example demonstrates this 
structure with English placeholder copy to 
help you understand the arrangement of 
information both in the code and in a sup-
porting browser
B
. The area for ruby text 
is highlighted:
<ruby>
base <rp>(</rp><rt>ruby chars 
</rt><rp>)</rp>
base <rp>(</rp><rt>ruby chars 
</rt><rp>)</rp>
</ruby>
Now, a real-world example with the two 
Chinese base characters for “Beijing,” and 
their accompanying ruby characters 
C
:
<ruby>
北 <rp>(</rp><rt>ㄅㄟˇ</rt><rp>) 
</rp>
京 <rp>(</rp><rt>ㄐㄧㄥ</rt><rp>) 
</rp>
</ruby>
A supporting browser will display the ruby text 
above the base (or possibly on the side), without 
parentheses.
Now, the ruby markup for “Beijing” as seen in a 
supporting browser.
Text  139
You can see how important the parenthe-
ses are for browsers that don’t support 
ruby
D
. Without them, the base and ruby 
text would run together, clouding the 
message.
At the time of this writing, only Safari 
5+, Chrome 11+, and all versions of Internet 
Explorer have basic ruby support (all the more 
reason to use rp in your markup). The HTML 
Ruby Firefox add-on (https://addons.mozilla 
.org/en-US/firefox/addon/6812) provides sup-
port for Firefox in the meantime.
You can learn more about ruby char-
acters at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Ruby_character.
The bdi and bdo elements
If your HTML pages ever mix left-to-right 
characters (like Latin characters in most 
languages) and right-to-left characters (like 
characters in Arabic or Hebrew), the 
bdi
and 
bdo
elements may be of interest.
But, first, a little backstory. The base 
directionality of your content defaults to 
left-to-right unless you set the 
dir
attribute 
on the 
html
element to 
rtl
. For instance, 
<html
dir="rtl"
lang="he">
specifies the 
base directionality of your content is right-
to-left and the base language is Hebrew.
Just as I’ve done with 
lang
in several 
examples throughout the book, you 
may also set 
dir
on elements within the 
page when the content deviates from 
the page’s base setting. So, if the base 
were set to English (
<html
lang="en">
and you wanted to include a paragraph in 
Hebrew, you’d mark it up as 
<p
dir="rtl"
lang="he">...</p>
.
A browser that supports ruby ignores the 
rp
parentheses and just presents the 
rt
content 
B
and 
C
. However, a browser that doesn’t support 
ruby displays the 
rt
content in parentheses, as 
seen here.
140  Chapter 4
With those settings in place, the content will 
display in the desired directionality most 
of the time; Unicode's bidirectional (“bidi”) 
algorithm takes care of figuring it out.
The 
bdo
(“bidirectional override”) element 
is for those occasions when the algorithm 
doesn’t display the content as intended 
and you need to override it. Typically, 
that’s the case when the content in the 
HTML source is in visual order instead of 
logicalorder.
Visual order is just what it sounds like—
the HTML source code content is in the 
same order in which you want it displayed. 
Logical order is the opposite for a right-to-
left language like Hebrew; the first charac-
ter going right to left is typed first, then the 
second character (in other words, the one 
to the left of it), and so on.
In line with best practices, Unicode expects 
bidirectional text in logical order. So, if 
it's visual instead, the algorithm will still 
reverse the characters, displaying them 
opposite of what is intended. If you aren't 
able to change the text in the HTML source 
to logical order (for instance, maybe it’s 
coming from a database or a feed), your 
only recourse is to wrap it in a 
bdo
.
To use 
bdo
, you must include the 
dir
attri-
bute and set it to either 
ltr
(left-to-right) 
or 
rtl
(right-to-left) to specify the direction 
you want. Continuing our earlier example 
of a Hebrew paragraph within an otherwise 
English page, you would type, 
<p
lang= 
"he"><bdo
dir="rtl">...</bdo></p>
 
bdo
is appropriate for phrases or sen-
tences within a paragraph. You wouldn’t 
wrap it around several paragraphs.
Text  141
The 
bdi
element, new in HTML5, is for 
cases when the content’s directionality is 
unknown. You don’t have to include the 
dir
attribute because it’s set to auto by 
default. HTML5 provides the following 
example, which I’ve modified slightly:
This element is especially use-
ful when embedding user-gen-
erated content with an unknown 
directionality.
In this example, usernames are 
shown along with the number of 
posts that the user has submitted. 
If the 
bdi
element were not used, 
the username of the Arabic user 
would end up confusing the text (the 
bidirectional algorithm would put the 
colon and the number “3” next to the 
word “User” rather than next to the 
word “posts”).
<ul>
<li>User :  
12 posts.</li>
<li>User :  
5 posts.</li>
<li>User :  
3 posts.</li>
</ul>
If you want to learn more on the subject 
of incorporating right-to-left languages, 
Irecommend reading the W3C’s article 
“Creating HTML Pages in Arabic, Hebrew, 
and Other Right-to-Left Scripts” (www.w3.org/
International/tutorials/bidi-xhtml/).
142  Chapter 4
The meter element
The 
meter
element is another that is new 
thanks to HTML5. You can use it to indicate 
a fractional value or a measurement within 
a known range. Or, in plain language, it’s 
the type of gauge you use for the likes of 
voting results (for example, “30% Smith, 
37% Garcia, 33% Clark”), the number of 
tickets sold (for example, “811 out of 850”), 
numerical test grades, and disk usage.
HTML5 suggests browsers could render 
meter
not unlike a thermometer on its 
side—a horizontal bar with the measured 
value colored differently than the maximum 
value (unless they're the same, of course). 
Chrome, one of the few browsers that sup-
ports 
meter
so far, does just that 
E
. For 
non-supporting browsers, you can style 
meter
to some extent with CSS or enhance 
it further with JavaScript.
Although it’s not required, it’s best to 
include text inside 
meter
that reflects the 
current measurement for non-supporting 
browsers to display 
F
.
Here are some 
meter
examples (as seen in 
E
and 
F
):
<p>Project
completion
status:
<meter
value="0.80">80%
completed</meter> 
</p>
<p>Car
brake
pad
wear:
<meter
low= 
"0.25"
high="0.75"
optimum="0"
value="0.21">21%
worn</meter></p>
<p>Miles
walked
during
half-marathon:
<meter
min="0"
max="13.1"
value="4.5"
title="Miles">4.5</meter></p>
meter
doesn’t have defined units of mea-
sure, but you can use the 
title
attribute to 
specify text of your choosing, as in the last 
example. Chrome displays it as a tooltip 
E
.
A browser like Chrome that supports 
meter
displays the gauge automatically, coloring it in 
based on the attribute values. It doesn’t display 
the text in between 
<meter>
and 
</meter>
.
Most browsers, like Firefox, don’t support 
meter
, so instead of a colored bar, they display 
the text content inside the 
meter
element. You can 
change the look with CSS.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested