pdf annotation in c# : Add links to pdf online application Library utility azure .net asp.net visual studio 03218237371-part1684

120
Digital Publishing with aDobe inDesign Cs6
In 周is Chapter
121 
Understanding Digital Publishing Suite Apps
125 
Design and Workflow Considerations
129 
Setting Up Your Document
130 
Interactivity and Digital Overlays
157 
The Folio Builder Panel
172 
Folio Producer
175 
What’s Next: Publishing Your App to a Store
175 
Resources
Add links to pdf online - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
clickable pdf links; add link to pdf acrobat
Add links to pdf online - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlink pdf file; pdf link open in new window
Chapter 5: tablet appliCations
121
W
hen
S
teve
J
obS
introduced
the iPad on January 27, 2010, the world 
expected another game-changing product from Apple. But few of us in 
publishing and design realized how profoundly it would change our world. 
Today, an increasing number of books and magazines are read with a swipe 
and a touch onscreen. Buttons and video are becoming as commonplace 
as editorials and classifieds. And the experience of reading is becoming 
much more immersive and engaging in the process.
InDesign is at the center of the publishing world for print, so it’s not 
surprising that it has now become a key part of publishing to the iPad and 
other tablets. With InDesign and Adobe’s complementary set of tools, 
known as the Digital Publishing Suite, a whole new world of design and 
interactivity has opened up to designers and publishers everywhere.
Understanding Digital Publishing Suite Apps
Several third-party products allow you to convert your InDesign layouts 
to tablet apps for the iPad, Kindle Fire, or Android tablets. Most of them 
provide a set of free plugins for creating interactive overlay elements, 
along with some means of converting your documents into an app. Our 
focus in this chapter will be on Adobe’s solution: the Digital Publishing 
Suite, also known as DPS.
Adobe’s Digital Publishing Suite consists of several components that 
allow you to bring your InDesign layouts to life as applications on tablets 
that include the iPad, the Kindle Fire, Android tablets such as the Samsung 
Galaxy, and even the iPhone (though our focus throughout this chapter 
will be on tablet apps). 周e DPS tools allow you to add interactive features 
to your publication and to publish your file in a folio format that allows 
it to be shared and published to tablet devices.
DPS tools include several components. Each plays a different part in the 
process of creating a tablet app from your InDesign layout.
■■
Folio Overlays panel: An InDesign panel that allows you to add 
interactive features for tablets to your layout.
■■
Folio Builder panel: An InDesign panel that allows you to assemble 
your files into folios, which are files that can be previewed and shared.
■■
Adobe Content Viewer (desktop version): A computer application 
that allows you to preview your content and interactivity as it will 
appear on a tablet.
DPS tools
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
HTML converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to Add necessary references
convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks; change link in pdf
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add, edit, delete links. Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically.
add links to pdf in preview; pdf hyperlink
122
Digital Publishing with aDobe inDesign Cs6
■■
Adobe Content Viewer (device version): A free application that is 
installed on your iPad (or other tablet) and allows you to preview 
your content and interactivity.
■■
Folio Producer: A browser-based application for organizing your 
folio files, adding metadata, and publishing folios.
■■
Viewer Builder: An Adobe AIR application that allows you to build 
a custom viewer app for your content that you can submit to Apple’s 
App Store, Amazon’s Appstore for Android, or Google Play.
周e Folio Builder panel is part of the standard installation of InDesign 
CS6. When you first open the panel, you will be prompted to update the 
panel by clicking a link. 周is takes you to Adobe’s website, where you can 
download the latest version of the DPS tools. Installing this package will 
add the Folio Overlays panel to InDesign and install the Desktop Viewer 
on your computer’s hard drive. As the DPS tools are updated, the Folio 
Builder panel will prompt you to download the latest version.
To finally publish your app and make it available for sale requires that 
you sign up for one of three DPS subscription programs. At the highest 
and most expensive level are the Enterprise and Professional Editions, 
which are geared to mid-sized or large publishers. 周ese allow publica-
tion of an unlimited number of single-issue folios or subscription-based, 
multi-issue folios (such as monthly magazines) on the iOS and Android 
platforms. Both also provide analytics, or data, about the folio downloads, 
with the Enterprise Edition offering additional services, such as the ability 
to create in-app custom navigation. 
周e Single Edition, which allows you to publish single-issue folios only, 
offers a more affordable entry point for small and individual publishers. 
In fact, the Single Edition will be made available to all Adobe Creative 
Cloud members for free. Non-subscribers to Creative Cloud have to pay a 
one-time license fee, which at the time of this writing is $395. 周e Single 
Edition is currently available for iPad only.
No matter which version you use, the tools and the creation process 
are the same. And anyone with an Adobe ID can use these tools to create 
and share folios with others. 
One important thing to note is that the components of DPS are regu-
larly updated, so you’ll want to check out the resources mentioned at the 
end of this chapter.
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
adding links to pdf; add links to pdf online
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness). C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C# Add necessary references
add a link to a pdf in preview; add link to pdf
Chapter 5: tablet appliCations
123
周e basic DPS workflow involves multiple steps. 周e diagram below 
illustrates the overall process. 
Sell
Analytics
Preview
Share
Publish
Create  
App
Creation
Production
Distribution
周e basic DPS workflow includes adding interactivity to your layouts, using the Folio Builder 
panel to assemble them into a folio to preview and share, publishing the folio, and creating an 
app for sale in the appropriate marketplace.
周e first step is to design your publication for viewing on a tablet and 
to add interactivity where appropriate. Design issues are discussed in the 
next section, “Design and Workflow Considerations” on page 125. Inter-
activity is added using InDesign’s built-in features (covered in Chapter 2) 
and the Folio Overlays panel, discussed in the section “Interactivity and 
Digital Overlays,” on page 130. 
Next, your individual InDesign documents, called articles, are assembled 
into a folio, which you can think of as the file format for a tablet app. 
周is assembly is done using the Folio Builder panel in InDesign, which 
is discussed in the section “周e Folio Builder Panel” on page 157. You can 
also import HTML articles into your folio, but we’re going to focus on 
working with InDesign files.
Once you’ve created your folio, you can preview it in a number of ways. 
You can view it on your computer by clicking the Preview button in the 
Folio Builder panel, which opens the Desktop Viewer. Or, install the Adobe 
Content Viewer on your iPad or other tablet, then sign in with your Adobe 
ID. 周e folio will then be available on your tablet. Both of these options 
are discussed further in “Previewing folios and articles” on page 167.
DPS workflow overview
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add hyperlink pdf; check links in pdf
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Management Using C#.NET Imaging
more detailed C# tutorials on each part by following the links respectively are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
clickable links in pdf from word; adding a link to a pdf in preview
124
Digital Publishing with aDobe inDesign Cs6
If you need to share your folio with others on your team or with a client, 
you can do so by clicking the name of the folio in the Folio Builder flyout 
menu and choosing Share from the menu. You can then enter multiple 
email addresses inviting others to view the folio. In order to view the folio, 
invitees must have an Adobe ID to sign in, and they can view the folio 
either on their tablet (using the Adobe Viewer) or in their Folio Builder 
panel in InDesign. See “Sharing folios” on page 170 for more information.
Once your folio is complete, use the Folio Producer to publish it to 
Adobe’s distribution system, the first step to getting your app in the Apple 
App Store, Amazon’s Appstore for Android, or Google Play. 
Whether you create a folio to share with a few colleagues or publish your 
app for sale to the general public, all DPS apps allow you to navigate pages 
in the same way, and all share a common user interface, or chrome — con-
trols that appear when the user taps the screen. 周e only exceptions are 
Enterprise Edition apps created with a custom interface. But the vast 
majority of DPS apps share the same “look and feel.”
When you download the free Adobe Content Viewer for your tablet, 
you’ll find an illustrated help file that explains this basic navigation and 
interface. It’s also common when publishing an app to include a similar 
help file so that users unfamiliar with the interface can fully experience 
and engage with your app.
Most DPS apps are set so that you read an article by swiping verti-
cally. 周e article may be set as individual pages or as one long, scrolling 
article. Swiping horizontally moves to the next article. However, a folio 
can also be set so that the user swipes horizontally only, much the way a 
print publication is read. With this navigation, the user basically swipes 
through every page of the publication. 
When the user taps the screen, standard DPS navigation controls 
appear. 周ese controls include the following icons:
■■
Home: tap to return to the app library.
■■
Table of Contents: tap to display the table of contents.
■■
Previous View: tap to go back to the previously viewed page.
■■
Browse Mode: tap to display thumbnail images of the articles.
■■
Scrubber: drag to scroll through the article thumbnails.
DPS app navigation 
and user interface
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
add hyperlink to pdf in; convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
add links in pdf; add links to pdf online
Chapter 5: tablet appliCations
125
Home icon
Table of Contents icon
Previous View icon
Browse Mode icon
Scrubber
DPS apps have a standard interface for navigation, also known as the chrome. 周e user taps the screen once to display the chrome 
and can then navigate the app’s pages.
Design and Workflow Considerations
Although tablet apps are electronic, they still use the concept of “pages.” 
But the design issues involved can be quite different from those encoun-
tered when designing for print. Interactive elements require a different 
way of thinking about how information is presented, and even about how 
the user is informed that elements of the page are interactive.
Another important difference is that many print publications, especially 
books and magazines, are really designed as facing-page spreads. Because 
the reader experiences both pages at once, they are effectively viewed as 
though they were a single page. When content moves to a tablet, there 
is no notion of spreads, and the overall design and design elements need 
to hold up in what are essentially single-page layouts.
126
Digital Publishing with aDobe inDesign Cs6
One of the first decisions you need to make when converting a print pub-
lication to a tablet app is the orientation of the pages in the app. Because 
the iPad and most other tablets have a built in accelerometer, the screen 
rotates depending on how you hold the device. You can design your pub-
lication with pages that can be viewed in only a vertical orientation, only 
a horizontal orientation, or both vertical and horizontal orientations.
Some publications use only a single orientation. Martha Stewart Living (left) is vertical only, and National Geographic (second 
from left) is horizontal only. Others, like Wired (right and second from right), use both vertical and horizontal orientations.
周ere is no right or wrong decision regarding page orientation. One 
thing to keep in mind, though, is that creating a publication with both 
orientations is going to be more work than creating a single-orientation 
app. New features in CS6, such as Liquid Layout rules and alternate layouts 
(discussed in Chapter 4), help with the process, but building an app with 
both orientations still requires extra effort.
Although tablet apps don’t display pages in spreads like print publications 
do, the content still needs to hold up on its own page. One nice thing 
about pages on tablet apps is that they can be set as individual pages 
(similar to a print publication) or as scrolling pages (so that content is 
one continuous page that scrolls vertically).
周e most common types of articles or pages that are set as scrolling 
pages are tables of contents, letters from the editor, credits, and colo-
phons — “list type” articles. Other types of stories that are well suited to 
scrolling pages are articles that consist of short snippets of information, 
such as new product releases, new hot spots to visit, or anything that is 
essentially a list of items. On the other hand, long blocks of text such as 
feature stories can be harder to read in a scrolling view. It's usually best 
to set those types of articles in a page-by-page view. 
Scrolling pages are easy to set up in InDesign. Simply make the InDe-
sign page long enough to fit the article. For example, you might set a 
horizontal page to 1024 x 2000 pixels and a vertical page to 768 x 2000 
pixels. (周e maximum page size in InDesign is 15,562 pixels.) You can also 
Page orientation: 
H, V, or both?
Scrolling vs. 
individual pages
Chapter 5: tablet appliCations
127
set the article to Smooth Scrolling in the Article Properties dialog box, 
discussed later in this chapter.
Whether content is set up in individual pages or as one scrolling page, 
it's a good idea to give the reader some visual cue that more content is 
available. 周is cue could be a graphic image that you can see only part of, or 
it could be an arrow or other icon that points toward the rest of the article. 
Fonts look beautiful on tablets, especially on the Retina display iPad 
(2012), but that doesn’t mean you don’t have to make adjustments for 
tablet apps. When it comes to fonts, the main difference between layouts 
in print and on tablets is that very often body text that looks fine in print 
is too small on the tablet version. Most publications increase the body 
text size by at least 1 point or more, along with increasing any smaller 
text in the layout.
When you’re working with images for tablet apps, there are a couple of 
things to keep in mind. Like fonts, images look fantastic on most tablets. 
But keep in mind that tablets use an RGB color space, so it’s a good idea 
to keep your images in RGB whenever possible. You can download an ICC 
profile for the iPad at http://indesignsecrets.com/downloads/forcedl/
iPad.icc. Load this profile into all your Creative Suite applications, and 
you’ll get more accurate color matching results. 
You’ll also want to keep your options open when cropping an image. 
Avoid destructive cropping. For example, you may crop an image one 
way for the cover of your vertically oriented print publication, but if you 
are creating a horizontal orientation for your tablet app, you’ll need to 
crop the image differently, with more of the image showing on the sides.
Use high-resolution images for all non-interactive content. InDesign 
will automatically sample the images correctly for the device you’re 
designing for. Some interactive content is sampled and some is not, as 
we’ll discuss in later sections.
Part of what makes publications on tablets so compelling are the interactive 
features that can be included. 周ere’s nothing like buttons, slideshows, 
or movies to spice things up! Because interactivity is such an important 
part of the tablet app experience, it’s important that your readers know 
it’s there. 
周e most common way to guide users to interactive elements is to 
develop a series of icons that indicate different types of activity. 周ese 
can be included on a help page at the beginning of your publication to let 
users know how to navigate and use the DPS controls that appear when 
the screen is tapped.
Fonts and images
Interactivity visual cues
128
Digital Publishing with aDobe inDesign Cs6
Indicate interactive elements in your app by developing a system of icons. 周ese are the icons 
used in National Geographic (top) and Martha Stewart Living (bottom). 
周ere are many issues regarding workflow when creating a tablet app 
publication, especially when it’s in conjunction with a print version. We 
can’t cover them all in detail here, but we’d like to mention a couple of 
very important things to consider.
First and foremost is the issue of resources. Whether you work on your 
own or are part of a workgroup, it takes time and energy to create a tablet 
app of your publication. Even with the tools that were added to CS6 to 
make the process of creating documents in multiple sizes and orientations 
easier, don’t underestimate the additional work that’s going to be involved. 
As we’ve been highlighting in this section, the design considerations for 
tablet apps are quite different from those for print. 
Another part of the typical workflow that is affected is proofing. How 
do you proof interactive content? How do you mark it up for changes? 
Certain elements can be output from InDesign in PDF format, but many 
cannot, or not very easily. Imagine you have a slideshow created with 
object states, each of which includes an image and text. You could make 
a PDF, but you’d have to make one for each state, one by one, and this 
can be very time consuming.
TIP 
The most important step you can take in planning your workflow for creat-
ing a tablet app is this: Plan ahead!
If you know you will be creating both a print and a tablet app version of 
your publication, plan for both at the very beginning. Allocate resources, 
whether it’s your own time or that of others, and right from the start, 
think about the assets as they relate to both your print version and your 
digital version.
Workflow 
considerations
Chapter 5: tablet appliCations
129
Setting Up Your Document
Part of the creation process for a tablet app is to set up your file properly. 
If you’re creating a document, InDesign CS6 has a new intent in the New 
Document dialog box: Digital Publishing. 
周e Digital Publishing intent changes several default settings in the New Document dialog 
box, and it sets the Swatches panel to RGB when the document is created.
周e Digital Publishing intent sets a primary text frame, which allows 
your text to reflow when you create alternate layouts. It also sets the 
Pages panel to display alternate layouts. Dimensions are set to pixels, 
pre-set page sizes for a number of popular mobile devices are listed, 
and the Swatches panel is set to RGB colors. Any of these settings can 
be changed, of course, and they can be captured for future use with the 
Save Preset option.
Keep in mind that many devices have an area that is used for naviga-
tion. For example, the iPad has a 6-pixel wide area on the right side of the 
screen that displays a scroll bar and crops the layout. You can download 
templates for the iPad that have guides to indicate parts of the screen that 
will be covered by the scroll bar or other parts of the interface at http://
gilbertconsulting.com/resources-misc.html
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested