pdf annotation in c# : Add hyperlink to pdf in preview Library SDK component .net wpf asp.net mvc 0789734273_Chapter_W20-part1708

W2
CHAPTER
I
n this chapter
Publishing Documents on the
World Wide Web
I
n this chapter
Understanding Web Documents s 40
Preparing Documents for the Web b 44
Publishing to HTML L 65
Publishing to PDF F 68
Troubleshooting 72
Add hyperlink to pdf in preview - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
clickable links in pdf from word; add hyperlink in pdf
Add hyperlink to pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add links pdf document; add hyperlink to pdf in
Web:40
Chapter W2 2 Publishing Documents on the World Wide Web
W2
Understanding Web Documents
One of the most interesting phenomena in the past few years has been the development of
the World Wide Web, usually referred to simply as the Web. Made possible by the develop-
ment of the Internet over the past 20–30 years, the Web enables anyone—from large corpo-
rations to individuals—to create and publish information that is easily and readily available
to anyone anywhere in the world. Today, such phrases as “check out my Web site” or “dot
com” are part of our everyday vocabulary.
Part of the success of the Web lies in the basic nature of Web documents. Unlike propri-
etary word processing formats that require specific word processors to be read, edited, or
printed, Web documents are standard ASCII (pronounced “ask-key”) textdocuments that
you can create with any common text editor.
At the heart of the Web page is HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), which consists of
tags that describe document formatting. This concept should be familiar to WordPerfect
users, who are used to seeing formatting codes in the Reveal Codes window. Most HTML
tags are used in pairs: one to turn on a formatting feature and another to turn it off. For
example, the markup tags used to add boldface to a word look like this:
<strong>text in bold</strong>
A Web document is placed on a Web server, a computer that does nothing more than honor
requests to “serve up,” or send, documents to those who want to see them.
Finally, you use a Web browserto view Web pages. When you specify a Web page address,
or URL (Uniform Resource Locator), yourbrowser contacts the designated Web server
over the Internet and requests a document. The server sends the HTML document to your
computer, and then your browser translates it into the attractively functional Web page you
see on your screen (see Figure W2.1).
Figure W2.1
Web servers send
HTML text documents
over the Internet to
computers that use
Web browser software
to view them.
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PowerPoint
Conversely, conversion from PDF to PowerPoint (.PPTX) is also supported. create, load, combine, and split PowerPoint file(s), and add, create, insert Hyperlink.
pdf reader link; pdf link to email
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.Word
Conversely, conversion from PDF to Word (.docx) is also supported you may easily create, load, combine, and split Word file(s), and add, create, insert Hyperlink.
chrome pdf from link; pdf edit hyperlink
Web:41
Understanding Web Documents
W2
WordPerfect and Web Document Languages
Since version 7, WordPerfect has included the capability of creating HTML documents.
WordPerfect’s Internet Publisher Wizard enabled users to create documents using HTML-
specific features, such as standard HTML headings, document backgrounds, forms, and
evencustomized HTML code. Further, one could open an HTML page and edit it in
WordPerfect.
Unfortunately, standard HTML, althoughviewable by the largest number of browsers,
severely limits the amount of formatting allowed in a document. Today’s computer users
demand more heavily formatted documents, which has led to changes in the complexity of
HTML and the development of other markup languages and methods of publishing Web
documents. SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language)and XML (Extensible Markup
Language)are two examples of specialized page languages that use standardized Document
Type Definitionsto far exceed the simple formatting capabilities of standard HTML. Finally,
the use of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) has emerged as a relatively easy but elegant method
of defining the use of nonstandard HTML elements, thus permitting the publishing of docu-
ments that look much more like your original word processing documents.
WordPerfect no longer provides the capability to create and edit standard HTML docu-
ments. Instead, it enables you to publish your documents as Web pages, converting your for-
matting using CSS so that the document appears virtually the same on the Web as it does in
WordPerfect. WordPerfect also includes the capability to develop Web documents using
SGML and XML. 
In this chapter, we explore how you can use WordPerfect to create effective and attractive
Web documents.
NOTE
WordPerfect isn’t for designing Web sites like you’re used to seeing on the Web these
days, with flashing graphics and JavaScript-based interactivity. Nevertheless, WordPerfect
is quite good at taking standard content pages and converting them into pages that look
good on the Web and that fit nicely within a Web site of complex design.
For information on using XML in WordPerfect, seeChapter W3, “Working with XML Documents.”
Publishing WordPerfect Documents to HTML
Publishinga WordPerfect document to HTML is actually quite simple. Just follow
thesesteps:
1. Save your file as a WordPerfect document.
2. Choose File, Publish to HTML. WordPerfect displays the Publish to HTML dialog
box (see Figure W2.2).
3. Click Publish. WordPerfect converts your document into HTML code and saves it as a
Web page document.
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.Excel
Conversely, conversion from PDF to Excel (.XLSX) is also supported. may easily create, load, combine, and split Excel file(s), and add, create, insert Hyperlink.
pdf hyperlink; change link in pdf
Web:42
Chapter W2 2 Publishing Documents on the World Wide Web
W2
Figure W2.3 showsa WordPerfect document, and Figure W2.4 shows the same document
as viewed in a Web browser, having been first published to HTML.
Figure W2.2
Use the Publish to
HTML dialog box to
choose options prior
to publishing your
document as a Web
document.
Figure W2.3
A WordPerfect docu-
ment, ready for pub-
lishing to HTML.
NOTE
We’ll save discussion of the Publish to HTML options until later, after we’ve had a chance
to explore how to prepare documents for publication to the Web.
Web:43
Understanding Web Documents
W2
Considerations in Publishing Documents to the Web
Although the process of publishing to HTML may be simple, there are several things you
must consider before publishing a document to the Web:
Web Page Format—WordPerfectprovides two powerful, yet significantly different,
methods for publishing documents to the Web. One is HTML aided by the use of
Cascading Style Sheets, the result of which is shown in Figure W2.4. The other is PDF,
the Portable Document Format developed by Adobe Corporation. PDF can produce a
more faithful representation of your original WordPerfect document than can HTML,
but it does require the use of a special reader. Fortunately, nearly everyone has this free
reader already installed.
Browsers—Usersmust use Web browser software to view Web documents. The most
popular browsers are Mozilla’s Firefox, Netscape Navigator, and Microsoft Internet
Explorer. Other browsers include Mozilla, Lynx, and Opera, and Safari for the
Macintosh. Each has its own particular strengths and weaknesses, and preference for
one browser over another is usually a matter of personal choice. However, browsers
alsocome in different versions, which further complicates things. For example, older
browsers might not support some features, such as Cascading Style Sheets, needed to
view your published pages. Finally, browsers often interpret and implement HTML and
other standards slightly differently. As you prepare your Web pages, you’ll have to con-
sider whether your readers will have the appropriate version, or if they can easily obtain
it. Fortunately, the latest versions of the most commonly used browsers display
WordPerfect HTML pages very well.
Figure W2.4
A WordPerfect docu-
ment, published to
HTML and viewed in a
Web browser.
Web:44
Chapter W2 2 Publishing Documents on the World Wide Web
W2
Platform—Partof the attractiveness of publishing to the HTML standard is that Web
documents can be viewed by browsers on a variety of computing platforms (for example,
Windows, Macintosh, or UNIX systems) and still look the same. Nevertheless, there
aresome differences among these platforms, and you need to test your pages on those
systems that your readers are likely to use.
Screenresolution—Mostusers these days view Web documents at the SVGA (Super
VGA, or 800 ×600) or XGA (1024 ×768) screen resolutions. But some still have older
systems and use a lower resolution of only 640 ×480. Some advanced users view Web
pages on their Personal Digital Assistants. You want to be sure that it’s easy for readers
to read the information on your Web pages regardless of the screen resolution they use.
Fonts—Unlessusers have the same fonts on their computers as you do on yours, you
might be limited to a few basic font styles. Consider whether a specific font is important
to you.
Accessibility—Someusers come to your Web site with visual disabilities and you need
to consider whether your pages can be understood by the special readers they use. Some
of the procedures discussed in this chapter address this issue specifically.
Plug-ins—A plug-inis an addition to a Web browser that adds functionality, such as
the capability to display animations or video, play sound, or read certain non-HTML
information. If your audience is not very computer literate, requiring viewers to down-
load and install plug-ins might not be worth the trouble.
As you prepare your documents for publication to the Web, keep these considerations
inmind.
Preparing Documents for the Web
Many of the formatting features and procedures you use in a WordPerfect document can
also be used as you create a Web page. However, the more difficult task might be to learn
what you can’tuse, and to create effective documents within the limitations imposed
byHTML.
Previewing a Web Document
As youprepare your document, you can quickly preview how it will look in your favorite
Web browser. That way, you can easily make adjustments before taking the more formal step
of publishing your document.
To preview how a WordPerfect document will look in a Web browser, follow these steps:
1. Save your work.
2. Choose View, Preview in Browser. WordPerfect opens your default Web browser (for
example, Firefox) and displays your document as if it were a Web document (refer to
Figure W2.4).
Web:45
Preparing Documents for the Web
W2
3. Switch back to WordPerfect and make any changes you want.
4. Repeat steps 1–2 to view the changes.
NOTE
When you preview a document in your browser, WordPerfect makes a temporary copy
of the HTML file named wpdoc.htm, usually located in your system’s temporary folder
(for example, c:\Documents and Settings\Owner\Local Settings\Temp).
TIP
You can quickly switch from your browser’s preview back to your document by pressing
Alt+Tab.
TIP
Because you need to preview your document in more than one browser, open your sec-
ond browser (for example, Netscape) and choose File, Open(or Open Page) and type
the location of the wpdoc.htm file(for example, c:\Documents and Settings\Owner\
Local Settings\Temp\wpdoc.htm). Then use Alt+Tab to switch from one browser to
another, or back to WordPerfect. Don’t forget that while in WordPerfect you must choose
View, Preview in Browserto update the page in your default browser, and that you need
to click the Refresh, or Reload, button in any other browser you may use.
Setting Document Properties
Whenyou open a Web page in your browser, typically you see a descriptive title of the page
in the title bar (for example, the blue bar at the top of the screen). This title helps you get a
quick idea of what the page is all about, but it’s particularly useful to those using screen read-
ersbecause they can’t otherwise quickly scan the page. Further, the words in a Web page
title often become the keywords used to locate documents by Web search engines such as
Yahoo!, Google, or AltaVista.
To set document properties for your Web page, follow these steps:
1. Choose File, Properties. WordPerfect displays the Properties dialog box(see
FigureW2.5).
2. In theDescriptive Name text box, typethe title you want to appear on the Web
browser’s title bar. Make it relatively short but as descriptive as possible. If you don’t
include anything here, the browser simply shows the page’s URL. For example,
“EnviroWear’s Earth Friendly Fashion Catalog” will be much more helpful to the
viewer than http://www.envirowear.biz/springcat05.html.
3. In the Keywords andAbstract text boxes, add a few significant keywords, and if you
want, a short abstract of the document.
4. Click OK to return to your document.
Web:46
Chapter W2 2 Publishing Documents on the World Wide Web
W2
When you preview the document, the title now appears in the title bar (see Figure W2.6).
Figure W2.5
Use the Properties
dialog box to set the
title and other key
information for your
Web page.
Figure W2.6
Descriptive names cre-
ated in the Properties
dialog box appear in
the Web browser’s
titlebar.
Although you don’t see it, the HTML source code now includes keywords and descriptions
used by search engines to make your document easier to find (see Figure W2.7).
Web Page Title
Keywords
Figure W2.7
WordPerfect inserts
keywords and
abstracts into the Web
document’s source
code.
Web:47
Preparing Documents for the Web
W2
Working with Text
By default, WordPerfect Web documents appear with a white background and black text, the
same as what you see in WordPerfect. You can’t change the background unless you go to
another Web page editor and add the necessary background color codes.
You can set a fill color (by choosing Format, Page, Border/Fill) but the results won’t be what
you expect. For example, a page filled with yellow in WordPerfect still shows a white border
in the margins, but only for the equivalent of the first WordPerfect page. WordPerfect also
converts all fillpatterns and gradient shading to solid colors.
NOTE
The source code forWeb documents is plain text and can be viewed in any texteditor.
NOTE
If you choose a textured or gradient fill, WordPerfect combines the foreground color with
white, resulting in a solid pastel color.
To learn how to manipulate background fills and colors, see“Adding Borders, Drop Shadows, and Fills,”
p. 183. 
Text alignmentvaries somewhat from what you’re used to seeing in WordPerfect. For exam-
ple, all tab types display properly in Web browsers—even right or centered tabs, with or
without dot leaders. However, HTML and WordPerfect permit only one space at a time—
multiple spaces are reduced to just one space (see Figure W2.8).
Figure W2.8
WordPerfect’s align-
ment features work
well in Web pages,
except that you’re
limited to using one
space at a time.
Paragraph formattingand alignment also reproduce well on the Web. For example, you can
use First Line Indent (Tab), Indent (F7), Double Indent (Ctrl+Shift+F7), or Hanging Indent
(Ctrl+F7).
You can also align textwith Left, Right, Center, and Full justification. However, All does not
work—the text remains left justified.
For information on text formatting, seeChapter 7, “Formatting Lines and Paragraphs,” p. 171.
Web:48
Chapter W2 2 Publishing Documents on the World Wide Web
W2
Working with Fonts
StandardHTML provides for the use of only three basic fonts: a sans-serif font such as
Arial, a serif font such as Times Roman, and a monospaced font such as Courier.
For more information on using fonts, see“Choosing the Right Font,” p. 62. 
However, with the aid of Cascading Style Sheets, WordPerfect can use nearly any font and
display it properly in the Web browser (see Figure W2.9).
Figure W2.9
You can use nearly
anyfont in your
WordPerfect Web page
document, and it will
display in the Web
browser if the
browser’s computer
also has the same
fonts.
The only catch is a fairly significant one—the computer on which the Web page is viewed
must also have the same font(s) installed. If it doesn’t, the Web browser automatically
chooses an alternative (usually Arial, Times, or Courier) to approximate the basic style of the
Web page font.
If you need a specific font for a title or letterhead, for example, you can try these options:
Create the text in the Draw program—Choose Insert, Graphics, Draw Picture, and
then use the Draw tools to create a text image. Copy the image while in the draw pro-
gram, return to WordPerfect, and then paste it into the document. If instead you just
return from Draw, WordPerfect inserts the entireediting area into your document,
including lots of white space. Text created this way is somewhat difficult to manage in
terms of size and position, but fonts and colors are usually quite true to the original.
Create the text as a graphic image using TextArt—If you want more options for the
final look of the text, this feature works well. Note that colors don’t always translate well
from TextArt images to the Web. However, such images are easier to size and position
than those created in Draw.
Create the text in any graphics program and save it in any file format (for exam-
ple, JPG or PCX)—Then, insertthe image into your document just as you do any
other graphic. This method is useful if you want to use the graphic over again, and
depending on the graphics program you use, it might give you more control over the
final look of the text.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested