1
.
The Electric Field 
Concepts and Principles
Electric Charge, Electric Field and a Goofy Analogy 
We all know that electrons and protons have electric charge. But what is electric charge and 
what does it mean for a particle, like a neutron, to not have electric charge
1
? On one level, the 
answer is that electric charge is the ability to create and interact with an electric field. Of 
course, this begs the question, what is an electric field? To try to answer this question, let’s 
look at mass and the gravitational field. 
In Newton’s theory of gravitation, every object that has mass creates a gravitational field. The 
object with mass is termed the source of the gravitational field. The source’s gravitational 
field, which fills all of space, encodes information as to the location and mass of the source 
into space itself. It’s almost as if an infinite number of little business cards have been printed 
and distributed throughout space with detailed information concerning the source’s 
characteristics. The gravitational field can be thought of as a huge number of business cards 
embedded into the fabric of space. (No, I am not joking, it looks like this.) 
1 kg source 
over there 
1 kg source 
up there 
1 kg source 
down there 
1 kg source 
right here 
1 kg source way 
over there 
1
Actually, neutrons are constructed from smaller particles called quarks that do have electric charge. 
Neutrons are neutral because the sum of the quark charges inside of them is zero. The distinction 
between an object having a net charge of zero and an object having no charge whatsoever is important 
when considering polarization.  
Pdf link - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink to pdf acrobat; convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks
Pdf link - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlinks to pdf; clickable pdf links
2
Typically when we draw the gravitational field we translate the message on the business cards 
into a mathematically equivalent message. Here’s a picture of the gravitational field near the 
surface of the earth. 
9.8 N/kg
9.8 N/kg
9.8 N/kg 
9.8 N/kg
9.8 N/kg 
9.8 N/kg 
9.8 N/kg 
9.8 N/kg 
9.8 N/kg
The relationship that allows you to “translate the business cards” is Newton’s expression for 
the gravitational field surrounding a mass, 
r
r
Gm
g
ˆ
2

where 
G is the gravitational constant, equal to 6.67 x 10
-11
N m
2
/kg
2
m is the source mass, the mass that creates the gravitational field.  
r is the distance between the source mass and the location of the business card. 
r
ˆ
is the unit vector that points from  the source mass to the business card. Notice that 
the direction of the gravitational field, g, is opposite to this direction. 
Every mass in the universe has a gravitational field described by this formula surrounding it. 
Additionally, every mass in the universe has the ability to “read the business cards” of every 
other mass. This transfer of information from one mass to another is the gravitational force 
that attracts masses together. (Once one mass reads another masses’ business card, the first 
mass feels a strange urge to go visit the second mass. The more enticing the business card (the 
larger the value of g) the stronger the urge.)  
Let’s drop the business card analogy and return to electric charges and electric fields. 
Basically, every object that has electric charge surrounds itself with an electric field given by 
a formula incredibly similar to the one for the gravitational field. How incredibly similar? 
Below is the formula for the electric field at a particular point in space, from a single source 
charge:  
r
r
kq
E
ˆ
2
where 
k is the electrostatic constant, equal to 9.00 x 10
9
N m
2
/C
2
q is the source charge, the electric charge that creates the electric field. Its value can 
be positive or negative, and is measured in coulombs (C). 
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
View & Process. XImage.Raster. Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.OCR. Microsoft Office. View & Process. XImage.Raster. Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.
change link in pdf file; add a link to a pdf file
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
adding links to pdf; accessible links in pdf
3
r is the distance between the source charge and the point of interest. 
rˆ
ˆ
is the unit vector that points from  the source charge to the point of interest 
Every charged object is surrounded by a field given by this relationship. Every other charged 
object in the universe can “read” this field and will respond to its information by feeling an 
electric force. Objects without electric charge neither create nor interact with electric fields 
(they can’t read the business cards). 
In this chapter you’ll learn how to calculate the electric field produced by charged objects. In 
the next chapter, you’ll learn how the electric field can be “sensed” by other electric charges 
resulting in the electric force. 
Charge and Charge Density 
Macroscopic objects are normally neutral (or very close to neutral) because they contain equal 
numbers of protons and electrons. All charged objects are charged because of either an excess 
or lack of electrons. (It’s much easier to add or remove electrons from an object than trying to 
add or remove the protons tightly bound inside the nuclei of its atoms.) Thus, the electric 
charge of any object is always an integer multiple of the electric charge on an electron.  
Because of its fundamental importance, the magnitude of the charge on an electron is termed 
the elementary charge and denoted by the symbol e. In a purely logical world, the charge on 
any object would be reported as a multiple of e. However, since the charge on a macroscopic 
system can be many multiples of e, a more user-friendly unit, the coulomb (C), is typically 
used to quantify electric charge. In this system, 
C
x
e
19
1.6 10
Thus, you can consider the charge on an electron as an incredibly small fraction of a coulomb, 
or a coulomb of charge as an incredibly large number of electrons. 
In many applications, in addition to knowing the total charge on an object you will need to 
know how the charge is distributed. The distribution of charge on an object can be defined in 
several different ways. For objects such as wires or other thin cylinders, a linear charge 
density
, will often be defined. This is the amount of charge per unit length of the object. If 
the charge is uniformly distributed, this is simply 
L
Q
where Q is the total charge on the object
2
and L its total length. However, if the charge 
density varies over the length of the object, its value at any point must be defined as the ratio 
of the charge on a differential element at that location to the length of the element: 
dL
dq
2
I will always use uppercase Q to designate the total charge distributed on a macroscopic object and 
lowercase q to designate either an unknown charge or the charge on a point particle. 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
c# read pdf from url; add links to pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add email link to pdf; pdf hyperlink
4
For objects such as flat plates or the surfaces of cylinders and spheres, a surface charge 
density
, can be defined. This is the amount of charge per unit area of the object. If the 
charge is uniformly distributed, this is  
Area
a
Q
or if the charge density varies over the surface: 
dA
dq
Lastly, for objects that have charge distributed throughout their volume, a volume charge 
density
, can be defined. This is the amount of charge per unit volume of the object. If the 
charge is uniformly distributed, this is  
V
Q
or if the charge density varies inside the object: 
dV
dq
To add to the confusion, you must realize that the same object can be described as having two 
different charge densities. For example, consider a plastic rod with charge distributed 
throughout its volume. Obviously, the charge per unit volume, 
, can be defined for this 
object. However, you can also define the object as having a linear charge density, 
, reporting 
the amount of charge present per meter of length. These two parameters will have different 
values but refer to exactly the same object. 
C# Raster - Raster Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks; pdf hyperlinks
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
Besides, here is the quick link for how to process Word document within We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add url to pdf; active links in pdf
5
Perfect Conductors and Perfect Insulators   
Determining how electric charges in real materials respond to electric fields is incredibly 
important but also incredibly complicated. In light of this, we will initially restrict ourselves 
to two types of hypothetical materials.  
In a perfect conductor, electric charges are free to move without any resistance to their 
motion. Metals provide a reasonable approximation to perfect conductors, although, of course, 
in a real metal a small amount of resistance to motion is present. When I refer to a material as 
a metal, we will approximate the metal as a perfect conductor. 
In a perfect insulator electric charges cannot move, regardless of the amount of force applied 
to them. Many materials act as insulators, but all real materials experience electrical 
breakdown if the forces acting on charges become so great that the charges begin to move. 
When I refer to an insulating material, like plastic, for example, we will approximate the 
material as a perfect insulator. 
Since electric fields create forces on electric charges, there cannot be static electric fields 
present inside perfect conductors. If a field was present inside a perfect conductor, the charges 
inside the conductor would feel an electric force and hence move in response to that force. 
They would continue to move until they redistributed themselves inside of the conductor in 
such a way as to cancel the electric field. The system could not reach equilibrium as long as 
an electric field was present. This re-arranging process would typically occur very quickly and 
we will always assume our analysis takes place after it is completed. 
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
reading PDF document in ASP.NET web, .NET Windows Forms and mobile developing applications respectively. For more information on them, just click the link and
add hyperlink to pdf in; pdf link to specific page
VB.NET Word: VB Code to Create Word Mobile Viewer with .NET Doc
For the respective tutorials of these Document or Image Mobile Viewer in VB.NET prorgam, please link to see: PDF Document Mobile Viewer within VB.NET
add hyperlink pdf file; add links to pdf file
6
.
The Electric Field  
Analysis Tools 
Point Charges 
Find the electric field at the indicated point. The 
charges are separated by a distance 4a. 
+2q 
-q 
The electric field at this point will be the vector sum of the electric field from the left charge (
L
E
) and the electric field from the right charge (
R
E
). 
Let’s examine the left charge first. Since the problem is expressed symbolically, the charge is 
simply “2q”, and the distance, r, between the charge and the indicated point of interest should 
be expressed in terms of “a”. Since each square in the diagram has width and height a, this 
distance can be expressed as: 
2
2
2
2
2
10
( )
(3 )
a
r
a
a
r
All that’s left to determine is the unit vector. The unit vector is simply a mathematical 
description of how to get from the source charge to the point of interest. In English, to get 
from the source charge to the point of interest you should move 3a in the x-direction and a in 
the y-direction
3
. This can be written as: 
ai aj
r
ˆ
ˆ
3
This is the vector that points from the source charge to the point of interest. However, this is 
not a unit vector since its magnitude isn’t 1. (A unit vector should convey a direction in space 
without altering the magnitude of the rest of the equation. It can accomplish this only if its 
magnitude is equal to 1.)  
3
For the sake of consistency, we will use a common coordinate system with the +x-direction pointing to 
the right and the +y-direction pointing to the top of the page. For three dimensional systems, the +z-
direction will point directly out of the page. The coordinate axes will be indicated in the vast majority of 
diagrams. 
7
However, it’s simple to convert a regular vector into a unit vector, just divide the vector by its 
magnitude. This leads to: 
10
ˆ ˆ
3
ˆ
10
ˆ ˆ
3
ˆ
10
ˆ ˆ
3
ˆ
(3 )
ˆ
ˆ
3
ˆ
2
2
2
i j
r
a
ai aj
r
a
ai aj
r
a
a
ai aj
r
Putting this all together yields: 
2
2
2
2
2
)
ˆ
0.0632
ˆ
(0.190
)
ˆ ˆ
(3
0.063
)
ˆ ˆ
(3
10
10
2
)
10
ˆ ˆ
3
(
10
( 2 )
ˆ
a
kq
j
i
E
i j
a
kq
E
i j
a
kq
E
i j
a
q
k
E
r
r
kq
E
L
L
L
L
L
8
Repeating for the right charge gives: 
2
2
3/2 3
2 3/2
2 3/2
2
2
2
2
2
2
)
ˆ
0.354
ˆ
(0.354
)
ˆ ˆ
(
0.354
)
ˆ ˆ
(
2
)
ˆ ˆ
(
(2 )
)
ˆ ˆ
(
)
(
)
( )
( )
ˆ
( )
ˆ
( )
(
( ) ) ( ( )
( )
ˆ
a
kq
j
i
E
i j
a
kq
E
ai aj
a
kq
E
ai aj
a
kq
E
ai aj
a
a
kq
E
a
a
ai a a j
a
a
k q
E
r
r
kq
E
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
 

 
 
 
Adding these two contributions together yields 
Thus, the electric field at the location indicated points to the right and slightly downward.  
2
)
ˆ
0.291
ˆ
(0.544
a
kq
j
i
E
9
Continuous Charge Distribution 
The plastic rod of length L at right has uniform 
charge density 
. Find the electric field at all 
points on the x-axis to the right of the rod. 
Electric charge is discrete, meaning it comes in integer multiples of electron and proton 
charge. Therefore, the electric field can always be calculated by summing the electric field 
from each of the electrons and protons that make up an object. However, macroscopic objects 
contain a lot of electrons and protons, so this summation has many, many terms:  
proton 
and
electron 
every 
2
ˆ
r
r
kq
E
As described earlier, we will assume that the charge on macroscopic objects is continuous, 
and distributed throughout the object. Mathematically, this means we will replace a 
summation over a very large number of discrete charges with an integral over a hypothetically 
continuous distribution of charge. This leads to a relationship for the electric field at a 
particular point in space, from a continuous distribution of charge, of:  
r
r
k dq
E
ˆ
( )
2
where dq is the charge on a infinitesimally small portion of the object, and the integral is over 
the entire physical object. 
Finding the electric field from a continuous distribution of charge involves several distinct 
steps. Until you become very comfortable setting up and evaluating electric field integrals, I 
would suggest you systematically walk through these steps.  
1.  Carefully identify and label the location of the differential element on a diagram of the situation. 
2.  Carefully identify and label the location of the point of interest on a diagram of the situation. 
3.  Write an expression for dq, the charge on the differential element. 
4.  Write an expression for r, the distance between the differential element and the point of interest. 
5.  Write an expression for , the unit vector representing the direction from the element to the point 
of interest. 
6.  Insert your expressions into the integral for the electric field.  
7.  Carefully choose the limits of integration. 
8.  Evaluate the integral. 
I’ll demonstrate below each of these steps for the scenario under investigation. 
r
ˆ
10
1.  Carefully identify and label the location of the differential element on a diagram of the situation. 
The differential element is a small (infinitesimal) piece of the object that we will treat like a 
point charge. The location of this differential element must be arbitrary, meaning it is not at a 
“special” location like the top, middle, or bottom of the rod. Its location must be represented 
by a variable, where this variable is the variable of integration and determines the limits of the 
integral.  
For this example, select the differential element 
to be located a distance “s” above the center of 
the rod. The length of this element is “ds”. 
(Later, you will select the limits of integration to 
go from –L/2 to +L/2 to allow this arbitrary 
element to “cover” the entire rod.)  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested