11
5.   Write an expression for , the unit vector representing the direction from the element to the point of 
interest. 
The vector going from  the element to the point of interest heads “down” a distance s and then 
to the right a distance x. This leads to a unit vector: 
2
2
2
2
ˆ ˆ
ˆ
( )
ˆ ˆ
ˆ
s
x
xi sj
r
s
x
xi sj
r
 
6.   Insert your expressions into the integral for the electric field.  
)
ˆ ˆ
(
ˆ
( )
2
2
2
2
2
s
x
xi sj
s
x
k ds
E
r
r
k dq
E
7.   Carefully choose the limits of integration. 
The limits of integration are determined by the range over which the differential element must be 
“moved” to cover the entire object. The location of the element must vary between the bottom of 
the rod (-L/2) and the top of the rod (+L/2) in order to include every part of the rod. The two ends 
of the rod form the two limits of integration. 
/2
/2
2
2
2
2
)
ˆ ˆ
(
L
L
s
x
xi sj
s
x
k ds
E
8.   Evaluate the integral. 
/2
/2
/2
/2
2 3/2
2
2 3/2
2
/2
/2
2 3/2
2
/2
/2
2
2
2
2
)
(
ˆ
)
(
ˆ
)
ˆ ˆ
(
)
(
)
ˆ ˆ
(
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
L
s
x
sds
j
s
x
ds
E k k xi
xi sj
s
x
ds
E k
s
x
xi sj
s
x
k ds
E
It’s typically easier to think of a vector integral as two, separate scalar integrals, one “in the x-
direction” and one “in the y-direction”, as above.  
rˆ
ˆ
Pdf edit hyperlink - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf edit hyperlink; clickable links in pdf from word
Pdf edit hyperlink - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf links; add hyperlink pdf document
12
Examining the x-integral (and using an integral table): 
i
L
x x
k L
E
L
x x
L
E k k xi
s
x x
s
E k k xi
s
x
ds
E k k xi
L
L
L
L
ˆ
4
1
( /2)
ˆ
ˆ
)
(
ˆ
2
2
2
2
2
/2
/2
2
2
2
/2
/2
2 3/2
2
I’ll leave it to you to evaluate the y-integral, but you should find that it equals zero. (Without 
doing any calculation whatsoever, you should know that the y-component of the electric field 
along the x-axis must be zero because of the symmetry of the situation. If it’s not clear why 
the y-component of the field must be zero, talk to your instructor!) 
Thus, the electric field along the x-axis is given by: 
i
L
x x
k L
E
ˆ
4
1
2
2
Does this function make sense? Two ways to check whether this field is reasonable are to 
determine how the function behaves for very small and very large values of x.  
As x gets very small, you are getting closer and closer to the charged rod. This should lead to 
an electric field that grows larger and larger (without bound). Notice that the limit of the 
function as x approaches zero does “go to infinity”, so the function does have the proper 
behavior for small x. 
As x gets very large, you are getting farther and farther to the charged rod. Not only should 
the field decrease, but as you get very far from the rod the rod should begin to look like a 
point charge. Notice that as x gets large, the term (L
2
/4) becomes negligible compared to x
2
This leads to a field 
i
x
k L
E
i
x x
k L
E
ˆ
ˆ
2
2
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
adding hyperlinks to pdf; add a link to a pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add link to pdf file; change link in pdf
13
Since the total charge on the rod (Q) is simply the product of the charge density and the total 
length of the rod, this reduces to 
i
x
kQ
E
ˆ
2
This is exactly the expression for the electric field from a point charge. Thus, as you move 
farther and farther from the rod, the rod does indeed begin to look like a point charge. 
Gauss’ Law 
The long, hollow plastic cylinder at right has inner 
radius a, outer radius b, and uniform charge density 
. Find the electric field at all points in a plane 
perpendicular to the cylinder near its midpoint. 
For certain situations, typically ones with a high degree of symmetry, Gauss’ Law allows you 
to calculate the electric field relatively easily. Gauss’ Law, mathematically, states: 
0
enclosed
q
E dA
Let’s describe what this means in English. The left side of the equation involves the vector dot 
product between the electric field and an infinitesimally small area that is a piece of a larger 
closed surface (termed the gaussian surface). This dot product between electric field and area 
is termed electric flux, and is often visualized as the amount of field that “passes through” the 
little piece of area. The integral simply tells us to add up all of these infinitesimal electric 
fluxes to get the total flux through the entire closed surface. 
The gist of Gauss’ Law is that this total electric flux is exactly equal to the total amount of 
electric charge enclosed within the gaussian surface, divided by a constant, 
0
. (
0
is the 
permittivity of free space, a constant equal to 8.85 x 10
-12
C
2
/Nm
2
.)  
Somewhat counter intuitively, the key to applying Gauss’ Law is to choose a gaussian surface 
such that you never really have to do the integral on the left side of the equation! To try to 
help you understand what I’m talking about, let’s walk through the solution of the above 
problem. The following sequence of steps will help you understand the process of applying 
Gauss’ law: 
1.  Choose the appropriate gaussian surface. 
2.  Carefully draw the hypothetical gaussian surface at the location of interest. 
3.  Carefully draw the electric field at all points on the gaussian surface.  
4.  Write an expression for the surface area parallel to the electric field. 
5.  Write an expression for q
enclosed
, the charge enclosed within the gaussian surface. 
6. 
Apply Gauss’ Law and determine the electric field at all points on this hypothetical surface.
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
processing images contained in PDF file. Please click to see details. PDF Hyperlink Edit. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers
add link to pdf acrobat; clickable links in pdf
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
processing images contained in PDF file. Please click to see details. C#.NET: Edit PDF Hyperlink. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package
add links to pdf document; add url link to pdf
14
Since we want to find the electric field at all points in space, there are three distinct regions 
we will have to investigate:  
the region inside the “hole” in the cylinder (r < a),  
the region within the actual material of the cylinder (a < r < b), 
and the region outside of the cylinder (r > b). 
Let’s start outside of the cylinder. 
Outside of the cylinder: r > b 
1.   Choose the appropriate gaussian surface. 
Gauss’ law is primarily useful when the objects under investigation have a high degree of 
symmetry. Gauss’ law basically exploits that symmetry to make the calculation of the electric 
field relatively painless. To exploit the symmetry of the situation, you should always choose a 
gaussian surface to mimic the symmetry of the object you are investigating. In this example, 
since the object is a cylinder, my gaussian surfaces will all be cylinders. 
2.  
Carefully draw the hypothetical gaussian surface at the location of interest. 
Since we are trying to determine the electric field for all points outside of the cylinder, draw a 
cylindrical gaussian surface with radius r. The value of r is variable, and can take on any 
value greater than b, the radius of the real cylinder. Remember, the gaussian surface is 
hypothetical; it’s a mathematical “object” that only exists to help you solve the problem. Try 
not to confuse it with the real cylinder of radius b. 
The gaussian surface is represented from two separate viewpoints below. (The gray cylinder 
is the actual, charged cylinder while the dashed cylinder is the gaussian surface.) The gaussian 
surface has radius r, where r can be any value greater than b, and length L. It is located near 
the midpoint of the actual cylinder. The gaussian surface also includes the circular “end caps” 
of the cylinder since a gaussian surface must be a closed surface. 
L
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
C#.NET edit PDF digital signatures, C#.NET edit PDF sticky note Merge all Excel sheets to one PDF file in VB Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
add url pdf; add hyperlink pdf
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
add hyperlinks to pdf online; add a link to a pdf in acrobat
15
3.   Carefully draw the electric field at all points on the gaussian surface.  
Although I have no idea what the magnitude of the electric field is at any point on my 
gaussian surface, the symmetry of the situation tells me that the direction of the electric field 
must be either radially away from or radially toward the central axis of the cylinder. If the 
charge density is positive, the field will be directed radially outward from the cylinder axis.  
Moreover, even though I don’t know the magnitude of the field, I do know that the magnitude 
is the same at every point on my surface. 
E
4.   Write an expression for the surface area parallel to the electric field. 
The left side of Gauss’ law requires us to evaluate an integral over the surface of our gaussian 
cylinder. The integral requires us to find the dot product between the electric field and the 
area, and integrate this dot product over the entire surface. I mentioned earlier that you should 
never have to actually do this integral (assuming you chose the “correct” gaussian surface). So 
why don’t we have to do this integral?  
The vector dot product can be re-written as: 
)cos
( )(
dA
E
E dA
where 
is the angle between the electric field and the area of the gaussian surface. You may 
recall from calculus that the “direction” associated with area is perpendicular to its surface. 
Thus, the direction of each infinitesimal area is indicated on the diagrams below.
E
E
dA 
dA 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital Signatures. Ability to get word count of PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark
add links pdf document; add link to pdf
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
signature; Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit. Support outline; More about PDF Hyperlink Edit ▶. PDF Metadata Edit. Support
add hyperlinks pdf file; adding a link to a pdf
16
Notice that the electric field vector and the area vector are parallel
at every point on the 
cylindrical portion of the gaussian surface and perpendicular at every point on the circular end 
caps. Thus, breaking the integral into two parts, one over the cylindrical portion of the 
gaussian surface and one over the end caps, yields: 
cylinder
endcaps
cylinder
dA
E
E dA
dA
E
dA
E
dA
E
E dA
)
( )(
90
)cos
( )(
)cos0
( )(
)cos
( )(
Now note that the magnitude of the electric field is the same at every point on the cylindrical 
portion of the gaussian surface since every point is equal distance from the charge 
distribution. Thus, the electric field is constant and can be brought outside of the integral, 
leaving a pretty easy integral to evaluate.  
cylinder
cylinder
cylinder
EA
E dA
dA
E dA A E
dA
E
E dA
)
( )(
Notice that the entire left-hand side of Gauss’ law reduces to the product of the electric field 
magnitude and the magnitude of the surface area parallel to this field. Thus, because of our 
wise choice of gaussian surface, all we really need to calculate is the magnitude of the surface 
area parallel to the electric field. In this case, the parallel area is given by: 
rL
A
A
cylinder
parallel
2
5.   Write an expression for q
enclosed
, the charge enclosed within the gaussian surface. 
Since the gaussian surface is outside of the real cylinder, all of the charge on the cylinder 
within the length L is enclosed. Since we know the volume charge density on the cylinder, 
the total charge on the cylinder within the length L is the product of the charge density and the 
volume of the cylinder. 
)
(
)
(
2
2
a L
b L
q
V
V
q
V
q
enclosed
hole
der
solidcylin
enclosed
enclosed

17
6.  Apply Gauss’ Law and determine the electric field at all points on this hypothetical surface.
r
a
b
E
a L
b L
rL
E
q
E A
q
E dA
enclosed
parallel
enclosed
0
2
2
0
2
2
0
0
2
)
(
)
(
)
(2
)
(

Thus, the electric field outside of the cylinder is inversely proportional to the distance from 
the cylinder. 
Now we have to repeat this analysis for the other two regions. 
Within the cylinder: a < r < b 
1.    Choose the appropriate gaussian surface. 
We will again use a cylindrical surface. 
2.   Carefully draw the hypothetical gaussian surface at the location of interest. 
Since we are interested in the electric field within the 
actual cylinder, the radius of our gaussian surface is larger 
than a but less than b. 
3.   Carefully draw the electric field at all points on the gaussian surface.  
As before, the magnitude of the electric field must be 
constant on the gaussian surface and directed radially 
outward due to the symmetry of the situation. 
E
18
4.   Write an expression for the surface area parallel to the electric field. 
The area parallel to the electric field is again the surface area of the cylindrical portion of the 
gaussian surface:  
rL
A
A
cylinder
parallel
2
5.   Write an expression for q
enclosed
, the charge enclosed within the gaussian surface. 
Since the gaussian surface is inside the real cylinder, not all of the charge on the real cylinder 
is enclosed by the gaussian surface. All of the charge between a and r is enclosed, but the 
charge between r and b is not enclosed by the gaussian surface. Thus, the amount enclosed is 
the product of the volume charge density and the volume of the portion of the cylinder 
enclosed by the gaussian surface. 
)
(
)
(
2
2
a L
r L
q
V
V
q
V
q
enclosed
hole
sian
withingaus
enclosed
enclosed

6.  Apply Gauss’ Law and determine the electric field at all points on this hypothetical surface.
r
a
r
E
a L
r L
rL
E
q
E A
enclosed
parallel
0
2
2
0
2
2
0
2
)
(
)
(
)
(2
)
(

Notice that this electric field increases with increasing r, since as r increases, more and more 
charge is available to produce the electric field. 
The last region we have to investigate is inside of the “hole” in the cylinder. 
Inside the “hole”: r < a 
Since we must choose our gaussian surface to have a 
radius less than a, it is located inside the hollow center of 
the cylinder. Since there is no charge enclosed by this 
gaussian surface, the electric field in this region must be 
zero. 
19
.
The Electric Field 
Activities 
20
Determine the direction of the net electric field at each of the indicated points.  
a.  
+q
-q
b.  
+q
+q
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested