itextsharp add annotation to existing pdf c# : Convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks software application dll windows html .net web forms 1481-part1756

Preface
Diving In
What is HTML5? HTML5 is the next generation of HTML, superseding HTML 4.01,
XHTML 1.0, and XHTML 1.1. HTML5 provides new features that are necessary for
modern web applications. It also standardizes many features of the web platform that
web developers have been using for years, but that have never been vetted or docu-
mented by a standards committee. (Would it surprise you to learn that the 
Window
object
has never been formally documented? In addition to the new features, HTML5 is the
first attempt to formally document many of the “de facto” standards that web browsers
have supported for years.)
Like its predecessors, HTML5 is designed to be cross-platform. You don’t need to be
running Windows or Mac OS X or Linux or Multics or any particular operating system
in order to take advantage of HTML5. The only thing you do need is a modern web
browser. There are modern web browsers available for free for all major operating
systems. You may already have a web browser that supports certain HTML5 features.
The latest versions of Apple Safari, Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, and Opera all
support many HTML5 features. (You’ll find more detailed browser compatibility tables
throughout this book.) The mobile web browsers that come preinstalled on iPhones,
iPads, and Android phones all have excellent support for HTML5. Even Microsoft has
announced that the upcoming Version 9 of Internet Explorer will support some
HTML5 functionality.
This book will focus on eight topics:
• New semantic elements like 
<header>
<footer>
, and 
<section>
(Chapter 3)
• Canvas, a two-dimensional drawing surface that you can program with JavaScript
(Chapter 4)
• Video that you can embed on your web pages without resorting to third-party plug-
ins (Chapter 5)
• Geolocation, whereby visitors can choose to share their physical locations with
your web application (Chapter 6)
• Persistent local storage without resorting to third-party plug-ins (Chapter 7)
ix
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
Convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink pdf document; active links in pdf
Convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
clickable links in pdf; add links to pdf
• Offline web applications that work even after network access is interrupted
(Chapter 8)
• Improvements to HTML web forms (Chapter 9)
• Microdata that lets you create your own vocabularies beyond HTML5 and extend
your web pages with custom semantics (Chapter 10)
HTML5 is designed, as much as possible, to be backward compatible with existing web
browsers. New features build on existing features and allow you to provide fallback
content for older browsers. If you need even greater control, you can detect support
for individual HTML5 features (Chapter 2) using a few lines of JavaScript. Don’t rely
on fragile browser sniffing to decide which browsers support HTML5! Instead, test for
the features you need using HTML5 itself.
Conventions Used in This Book
The following typographical conventions are used in this book:
Italic
Indicates new terms, URLs, email addresses, filenames, and file extensions.
Constant width
Used for program listings, as well as within paragraphs to refer to program elements
such as variable or function names, databases, data types, environment variables,
statements, and keywords.
Constant width bold
Shows commands or other text that should be typed literally by the user.
Constant width italic
Shows text that should be replaced with user-supplied values or by values deter-
mined by context.
This icon signifies a tip, suggestion, or general note.
This icon indicates a warning or caution.
x | Preface
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Available zoom setting (fit page, fit width). .NET component to convert adobe PDF file to html viewer.
add link to pdf file; add page number to pdf hyperlink
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links. Our PDF to HTML converter library control is a 100% clean .NET which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML
pdf link open in new window; change link in pdf
Using Code Examples
This book is here to help you get your job done. In general, you may use the code in
this book in your programs and documentation. You do not need to contact us for
permission unless you’re reproducing a significant portion of the code. For example,
writing a program that uses several chunks of code from this book does not require
permission. Selling or distributing a CD-ROM of examples from O’Reilly books does
require permission. Answering a question by citing this book and quoting example
code does not require permission. Incorporating a significant amount of example code
from this book into your product’s documentation does require permission.
We appreciate, but do not require, attribution. An attribution usually includes the title,
author, publisher, and ISBN. For example: “HTML5: Up and Running by Mark Pilgrim.
Copyright 2010 O’Reilly Media, Inc., 978-0-596-80602-6.”
If you feel your use of code examples falls outside fair use or the permission given above,
feel free to contact us at permissions@oreilly.com.
A Note on the Editions of This Book
This book is derived from its HTML5 source, found at http://diveintohtml5.org/ and
maintained by the author. The ebook and Safari Books Online editions include all the
original hyperlinking, while the print edition includes only a subset of the hyperlinks,
set as URLs in parentheses. If you are reading the print edition, please refer to one of
the other editions—or the original source—for a richer linking experience. Because the
author maintains http://diveintohtml5.org/ in HTML5, the site includes live examples
of the code described in this book, many of which had to be modified for publication.
Please visit http://diveintohtml5.org/ to see these examples, but be aware that their ren-
dering may vary across browsers.
Safari® Books Online
Safari Books Online is an on-demand digital library that lets you easily
search over 7,500 technology and creative reference books and videos to
find the answers you need quickly.
With a subscription, you can read any page and watch any video from our library online.
Read books on your cell phone and mobile devices. Access new titles before they are
available for print, and get exclusive access to manuscripts in development and post
feedback for the authors. Copy and paste code samples, organize your favorites, down-
load chapters, bookmark key sections, create notes, print out pages, and benefit from
tons of other time-saving features.
Preface | xi
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
Download from Library of Wow! eBook 
<www.wowebook.com>
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET Able to replace all PDF page contents in VB.NET
add hyperlink to pdf acrobat; pdf link to email
VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in
svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET an easy work and gives quick access to PDF page and
add links in pdf; add url to pdf
O’Reilly Media has uploaded this book to the Safari Books Online service. To have full
digital access to this book and others on similar topics from O’Reilly and other pub-
lishers, sign up for free at http://my.safaribooksonline.com.
How to Contact Us
Please address comments and questions concerning this book to the publisher:
O’Reilly Media, Inc.
1005 Gravenstein Highway North
Sebastopol, CA 95472
800-998-9938 (in the United States or Canada)
707-829-0515 (international or local)
707-829-0104 (fax)
We have a web page for this book, where we list errata, examples, and any additional
information. You can access this page at:
http://oreilly.com/catalog/9780596806026/
To comment or ask technical questions about this book, send email to:
bookquestions@oreilly.com
For more information about our books, conferences, Resource Centers, and the
O’Reilly Network, see our website at:
http://www.oreilly.com
xii | Preface
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
Able to convert PDF documents into other formats (multipage TIFF, JPEG, etc Include extraction of text, hyperlinks, bookmarks and metadata; Advanced document
add link to pdf acrobat; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
with advanced capabilities, such as text extraction, hyperlinks, bookmarks and easy-to-use interface enabling you to quickly convert your PDF images into
add hyperlink to pdf online; pdf hyperlink
CHAPTER 1
How Did We Get Here?
Diving In
Recently, I stumbled across a quote from a Mozilla developer about the tension inherent
in creating standards:
Implementations and specifications have to do a delicate dance together. You don’t want
implementations to happen before the specification is finished, because people start de-
pending on the details of implementations and that constrains the specification. How-
ever, you also don’t want the specification to be finished before there are implementations
and author experience with those implementations, because you need the feedback.
There is unavoidable tension here, but we just have to muddle on through.
Keep this quote in the back of your mind, and let me explain how HTML5 came to be.
MIME Types
This book is about HTML5, not previous versions of HTML, and not any version of
XHTML. But to understand the history of HTML5 and the motivations behind it, you
need to understand a few technical details first. Specifically, MIME types.
Every time your web browser requests a page, the web server sends a number of headers
before it sends the actual page markup. These headers are normally invisible, although
there are a number of web development tools that will make them visible if you’re
interested. The headers are important, because they tell your browser how to interpret
the page markup that follows. The most important header is called 
Content-Type
, and
it looks like this:
Content-Type: text/html
text/html
is called the “content type” or “MIME type” of the page. This header is the
only thing that determines what a particular resource truly is, and therefore how it
should be rendered. Images have their own MIME types (
image/jpeg
for JPEG images,
image/png
for PNG images, and so on). JavaScript files have their own MIME type. CSS
1
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
stylesheets have their own MIME type. Everything has its own MIME type. The Web
runs on MIME types.
Of course, reality is more complicated than that. Very early web servers (I’m talking
web servers from 1993) didn’t send the 
Content-Type
header, because it didn’t exist yet.
(It wasn’t invented until 1994.) For compatibility reasons that date all the way back to
1993, some popular web browsers will ignore the 
Content-Type
header under certain
circumstances. (This is called “content sniffing.”) But as a general rule of thumb, ev-
erything you’ve ever looked at on the Web—HTML pages, images, scripts, videos,
PDFs, anything with a URL—has been served to you with a specific MIME type in the
Content-Type
header.
Tuck that under your hat. We’ll come back to it.
A Long Digression into How Standards Are Made
Why do we have an 
<img>
element? I don’t suppose that’s a question you ask yourself
very often. Obviously someone must have created it. These things don’t just appear out
of nowhere. Every element, every attribute, every feature of HTML that you’ve ever
used—someone created them, decided how they should work, and wrote it all down.
These people are not gods, nor are they flawless. They’re just people. Smart people, to
be sure. But just people.
One of the great things about standards that are developed “out in the open” is that
you can go back in time and answer these kinds of questions. Discussions occur on
mailing lists, which are usually archived and publicly searchable. So, I decided to do a
bit of “email archaeology” to try to answer the 
<img>
element question. I had to go back
to before there was an organization called the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).
I went back to the earliest days of the Web, when you could count the number of web
servers on the fingers of both hands, and maybe a couple of toes.
On February 25, 1993, Marc Andreessen wrote:*
I’d like to propose a new, optional HTML tag:
IMG
Required argument is 
SRC="url"
.
This names a bitmap or pixmap file for the browser to attempt to pull over the network
and interpret as an image, to be embedded in the text at the point of the tag’s occurrence.
An example is:
<IMG SRC="file://foobar.com/foo/bar/blargh.xbm">
(There is no closing tag; this is just a standalone tag.)
http://1997.webhistory.org/www.lists/www-talk.1993q1/0182.html. The thread described over the next
several pages can be followed by clicking the “Next message” and “Previous message” links.
2 | Chapter 1: How Did We Get Here?
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
This tag can be embedded in an anchor like anything else; when that happens, it becomes
an icon that’s sensitive to activation just like a regular text anchor.
Browsers should be afforded flexibility as to which image formats they support. Xbm
and Xpm are good ones to support, for example. If a browser cannot interpret a given
format, it can do whatever it wants instead (X Mosaic will pop up a default bitmap as a
placeholder).
This is required functionality for X Mosaic; we have this working, and we’ll at least be
using it internally. I’m certainly open to suggestions as to how this should be handled
within HTML; if you have a better idea than what I’m presenting now, please let me
know. I know this is hazy with regard to image format, but I don’t see an alternative than
to just say “let the browser do what it can” and wait for the perfect solution to come
along (MIME, someday, maybe).
This quote requires some explanation. Xbm and Xpm were popular graphics formats
on Unix systems.
“Mosaic” was one of the earliest web browsers. (“X Mosaic” was the version that ran
on Unix systems.) When he wrote this message in early 1993, Marc had not yet founded
the company that made him famous, Mosaic Communications Corporation, nor had
he started work on that company’s flagship product, “Mosaic Netscape.” (You may
know them better by their later names, “Netscape Corporation” and “Netscape
Navigator.”)
“MIME, someday, maybe” is a reference to content negotiation, a feature of HTTP
where a client (like a web browser) tells the server (like a web server) what types of
resources it supports (like 
image/jpeg
) so the server can return something in the client’s
preferred format. “The Original HTTP as defined in 1991” (the only version that was
implemented in February 1993) did not have a way for clients to tell servers what kinds
of images they supported, thus the design dilemma that Marc faced.
A few hours later, Tony Johnson replied:
I have something very similar in Midas 2.0 (in use here at SLAC, and due for public release
any week now), except that all the names are different, and it has an extra argument
NAME="name"
. It has almost exactly the same functionality as your proposed 
IMG
tag. e.g.,
<ICON name="NoEntry" href="http://note/foo/bar/NoEntry.xbm">
The idea of the name parameter was to allow the browser to have a set of “built in”
images. If the name matches a “built in” image it would use that instead of having to go
out and fetch the image. The name could also act as a hint for “line mode” browsers as
to what kind of a symbol to put in place of the image.
I don’t much care about the parameter or tag names, but it would be sensible if we used
the same things. I don’t much care for abbreviations, i.e., why not 
IMAGE=
and 
SOURCE=
. I
somewhat prefer 
ICON
since it implies that the 
IMAGE
should be smallish, but maybe
ICON
is an overloaded word?
Midas was another early web browser, a contemporary of X Mosaic. It was cross-
platform; it ran on both Unix and VMS. “SLAC” refers to the Stanford Linear
Accelerator Center, now the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, which hosted the
A Long Digression into How Standards Are Made | 3
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
first web server in the United States (in fact, the first web server outside Europe). When
Tony wrote this message, SLAC was an old-timer on the WWW, having hosted five
pages on its web server for a whopping 441 days.
Tony continued:
While we are on the subject of new tags, I have another, somewhat similar tag, which I
would like to support in Midas 2.0. In principle it is:
<INCLUDE HREF="...">
The intention here would be that the second document is to be included into the first
document at the place where the tag occurred. In principle the referenced document
could be anything, but the main purpose was to allow images (in this case arbitrary sized)
to be embedded into documents. Again the intention would be that when HTTP2 comes
along the format of the included document would be up for separate negotiation.
“HTTP2” is a reference to Basic HTTP as defined in 1992. At this point, in early 1993,
it was still largely unimplemented. The draft known as “HTTP2” evolved and was
eventually standardized as “HTTP 1.0”. HTTP 1.0 did include request headers for
content negotiation, a.k.a. “MIME, someday, maybe.”
Tony went on:
An alternative I was considering was:
<A HREF="..." INCLUDE>See photo</A>
I don’t much like adding more functionality to the 
<A>
tag, but the idea here is to maintain
compatibility with browsers that can not honour the 
INCLUDE
parameter. The intention
is that browsers which do understand 
INCLUDE
, replace the anchor text (in this case “See
photo”) with the included document (picture), while older or dumber browsers ignore
the 
INCLUDE
tag completely.
This proposal was never implemented, although the idea of providing text if an image
is missing is an important accessibility technique that was missing from Marc’s initial
<IMG>
proposal. Many years later, this  feature was  bolted on  as the 
<img alt>
attribute, which Netscape promptly broke by erroneously treating it as a tooltip.
A few hours after Tony posted his message, Tim Berners-Lee responded:
I had imagined that figures would be represented as
<a name=fig1 href="fghjkdfghj" REL="EMBED, PRESENT">Figure </a>
where the relationship values mean
EMBED    Embed this here when presenting it
PRESENT  Present this whenever the source document is presented
Note that you can have various combinations of these, and if the browser doesn’t support
either one, it doesn’t break.
[I] see that using this as a method for selectable icons means nesting anchors. Hmmm.
But I hadn’t wanted a special tag.
4 | Chapter 1: How Did We Get Here?
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
This proposal was never implemented, but the 
rel
attribute is still around (see “Friends
and (Link) Relations” on page 36).
Jim Davis added:
It would be nice if there was a way to specify the content type, e.g.
<IMG HREF="http://nsa.gov/pub/sounds/gorby.au" CONTENT-TYPE=audio/basic>
But I am completely willing to live with the requirement that I specify the content type
by file extension.
This proposal was never implemented, but Netscape did later add support for arbitrary
embedding of media objects with the 
<embed>
element.
Jay C. Weber asked:
While images are at the top of my list of desired medium types in a WWW browser, I
don’t think we should add idiosyncratic hooks for media one at a time. Whatever hap-
pened to the enthusiasm for using the MIME typing mechanism?
Marc Andreessen replied:
This isn’t a substitute for the upcoming use of MIME as a standard document mecha-
nism; this provides a necessary and simple implementation of functionality that’s needed
independently from MIME.
Jay C. Weber responded:
Let’s temporarily forget about MIME, if it clouds the issue. My objection was to the
discussion of “how are we going to support embedded images” rather than “how are we
going to support embedded objections in various media.”
Otherwise, next week someone is going to suggest “let’s put in a new tag 
<AUD
SRC="file://foobar.com/foo/bar/blargh.snd">
” for audio.
There shouldn’t be much cost in going with something that generalizes.
With the benefit of hindsight, it appears that Jay’s concerns were well founded. It took
a little more than a week, but HTML5 did finally add new 
<video>
and 
<audio>
elements.
Responding to Jay’s original message, Dave Raggett said:
True indeed! I want to consider a whole range of possible image/line art types, along with
the possibility of format negotiation. Tim’s note on supporting clickable areas within
images is also important.
Later in 1993, Dave proposed HTML+ as an evolution of the HTML standard. The
proposal was never implemented, and it was superseded by HTML 2.0. HTML 2.0 was
a “retro-spec,” which means it formalized features already in common use: “This
specification brings together, clarifies, and formalizes a set of features that roughly
corresponds to the capabilities of HTML in common use prior to June 1994.”
A Long Digression into How Standards Are Made | 5
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
Dave later wrote HTML 3.0, based on his earlier HTML+ draft. Outside of the W3C’s
own reference implementation, Arena, HTML 3.0 was never implemented. It was su-
perseded by HTML 3.2, which was also a “retro-spec”: “HTML 3.2 adds widely
deployed features such as tables, applets and text flow around images, while providing
full backward compatibility with the existing standard HTML 2.0.”
Dave later coauthored HTML 4.0, developed HTML Tidy, and went on to help with
XHTML, XForms, MathML, and other modern W3C specifications.
Getting back to 1993, Marc replied to Dave:
Actually, maybe we should think about a general-purpose procedural graphics language
within which we can embed arbitrary hyperlinks attached to icons, images, or text, or
anything. Has anyone else seen Intermedia’s capabilities with regard to this?
Intermedia was a hypertext project from Brown University. It was developed from 1985
to 1991 and ran on A/UX, a Unix-like operating system for early Macintosh computers.
The idea of a “general-purpose procedural graphics language” did eventually catch on.
Modern browsers support both SVG (declarative markup with embedded scripting)
and 
<canvas>
(a procedural direct-mode graphics API), although the latter started as a
proprietary extension before being “retro-specced” by the WHAT Working Group.
Bill Janssen replied:
Other systems to look at which have this (fairly valuable) notion are Andrew and Slate.
Andrew is built with _insets_, each of which has some interesting type, such as text,
bitmap, drawing, animation, message, spreadsheet, etc. The notion of arbitrary recursive
embedding is present, so that an inset of any kind can be embedded in any other kind
which supports embedding. For example, an inset can be embedded at any point in the
text of the text widget, or in any rectangular area in the drawing widget, or in any cell of
the spreadsheet.
“Andrew” is a reference to the Andrew User Interface System, although at that time it
was simply known as the Andrew Project.
Meanwhile, Thomas Fine had a different idea:
Here’s my opinion. The best way to do images in WWW is by using MIME. I’m sure
postscript is already a supported subtype in MIME, and it deals very nicely with mixing
text and graphics.
But it isn’t clickable, you say? Yes, you’re right. I suspect there is already an answer to
this in display postscript. Even if there isn’t the addition to standard postscript is trivial.
Define an anchor command which specifies the URL and uses the current path as a closed
region for the button. Since postscript deals so well with paths, this makes arbitrary
button shapes trivial.
Display PostScript was an onscreen rendering technology codeveloped by Adobe and
NeXT.
This proposal was never implemented, but the idea that the best way to fix HTML is
to replace it with something else altogether still pops up from time to time.
6 | Chapter 1: How Did We Get Here?
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested