itextsharp add annotation to existing pdf c# : Add hyperlink to pdf online control SDK system web page wpf windows console 14810-part1757

The MP3 standard doesn’t define exactly how to encode MP3s (although it does define
exactly how to decode them); different encoders use different psychoacoustic models
that produce wildly different results, but are all decodable by the same players. The
open source LAME project is the best free encoder, and arguably the best encoder,
period, for all but the lowest bitrates.
The MP3 format is patent-encumbered, which explains why Linux can’t play MP3 files
out of the box. Pretty much every portable music player supports standalone MP3 files,
and MP3 audio streams can be embedded in any video container. Adobe Flash can play
both standalone MP3 files and MP3 audio streams within an MP4 video container.
Advanced Audio Coding
Advanced Audio Coding is affectionately known as “AAC.” Standardized in 1997, it
lurched into prominence when Apple chose it as the default format for the iTunes Store.
Originally, all AAC files “bought” from the iTunes Store were encrypted with Apple’s
proprietary DRM scheme, called FairPlay. Many songs in the iTunes Store are now
available as unprotected AAC files, which Apple calls “iTunes Plus” because it sounds
so much better than calling everything else “iTunes Minus.” The AAC format is patent-
encumbered; licensing rates are available online.
AAC was designed to provide better sound quality than MP3 at the same bitrate, and
it can encode audio at any bitrate. (MP3 is limited to a fixed number of bitrates, with
an upper bound of 320 kbps.) AAC can encode up to 48 channels of sound, although
in practice no one does that. The AAC format also differs from MP3 in defining multiple
profiles, in much the same way as H.264, and for the same reasons. The “low-
complexity” profile is designed to be playable in real time on devices with limited CPU
power, while higher profiles offer better sound quality at the same bitrate, at the expense
of slower encoding and decoding.
All current Apple products, including iPods, AppleTV, and QuickTime, support certain
profiles of AAC in standalone audio files and in audio streams in an MP4 video con-
tainer. Adobe Flash supports all profiles of AAC in MP4, as do the open source MPlayer
and VLC video players. For encoding, the FAAC library is the open source option;
support for it is a compile-time option in mencoder and ffmpeg.
Vorbis
Vorbis is often called “Ogg Vorbis,” although this is technically incorrect—“Ogg” is
just a container format (see “Video Containers” on page 81), and Vorbis audio streams
can be embedded in other containers. Vorbis is not encumbered by any known patents
and is therefore supported out of the box by all major Linux distributions and by port-
able devices running the open source Rockbox firmware. Mozilla Firefox 3.5 supports
Vorbis audio files in an Ogg container, or Ogg videos with a Vorbis audio track. An
droid mobile phones can also play standalone Vorbis audio files. Vorbis audio streams
Audio Codecs | 87
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
Add hyperlink to pdf online - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
pdf link; change link in pdf file
Add hyperlink to pdf online - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlink in pdf; adding a link to a pdf
are usually embedded in an Ogg or WebM container, but they can also be embedded
in an MP4 or MKV container, or, with some hacking, in AVI. Vorbis supports an ar-
bitrary number of sound channels.
There are open source Vorbis encoders and decoders, including the OggConvert
encoder, the ffmpeg decoder, the aoTuV encoder, and the libvorbis decoder. There are
also QuickTime components for Mac OS X and DirectShow filters for Windows.
What Works on the Web
If your eyes haven’t glazed over yet, you’re doing better than most. As you can tell,
video (and audio) is a complicated subject—and this was the abridged version! I’m sure
you’re wondering how all of this relates to HTML5. Well, HTML5 includes a
<video>
element for embedding video into a web page. There are no restrictions on the
video codec, audio codec, or container format you can use for your video. One
<video>
element can link to multiple video files, and the browser will choose the first
video file it can actually play. It is up to you to know which browsers support which
containers and codecs.
As of this writing, this is the landscape of HTML5 video:
• Mozilla Firefox (3.5 and later) supports Theora video and Vorbis audio in an
Ogg container.
• Opera (10.5 and later) supports Theora video and Vorbis audio in an Ogg
container.
• Google Chrome (3.0 and later) supports Theora video and Vorbis audio in an Ogg
container. It also supports H.264 video (all profiles) and AAC audio (all profiles)
in an MP4 container.
• As of this writing (June 9, 2010), the “dev channel” of Google Chrome, nightly
builds of Chromiumnightly builds of Mozilla Firefox, and experimental builds of
Opera all support VP8 video and Vorbis audio in a WebM container. (Visit webm
project.org for more up-to-date information and download links for WebM-
compatible browsers.)
• Safari on Macs and Windows PCs (3.0 and later) will support anything that Quick-
Time supports. In theory, you could require your users to install third-party Quick-
Time plug-ins. In practice, very few users are going to do that. So you’re left with
the formats that QuickTime supports “out of the box.” This is a long list, but it
does not include Theora video, Vorbis audio, or the Ogg container. However,
QuickTime does support H.264 video (Main profile) and AAC audio in an MP4
container.
• Mobile devices like Apple’s iPhone and Google Android phones support H.264
video (Baseline profile) and AAC audio (low-complexity profile) in an MP4
container.
88 | Chapter 5: Video on the Web
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Word to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
adding hyperlinks to pdf files; clickable links in pdf from word
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Excel to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
add hyperlink to pdf; add links to pdf online
• Adobe Flash (9.0.60.184 and later) supports H.264 video (all profiles) and AAC
audio (all profiles) in an MP4 container.
• Internet Explorer 9 will support some as-yet-unspecified profiles of H.264 video
and AAC audio in an MP4 container.
• Internet Explorer 8 has no HTML5 video support at all, but virtually all Internet
Explorer users will have the Adobe Flash plug-in. Later in this chapter, I’ll show
you how you can use HTML5 video but gracefully fall back to Flash.
Table 5-2 provides the above information in an easier-to-digest form.
Table 5-2. Video codec support in shipping browsers
Codecs/Container
IE
Firefox
Safari
Chrome
Opera
iPhone
Android
Theora+Vorbis+Ogg
·
3.5+
·
5.0+
10.5+
·
·
H.264+AAC+MP4
·
·
3.0+
5.0+
·
3.0+
2.0+
WebM
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
A year from now, the landscape will look significantly different: WebM will be imple-
mented in multiple browsers, those browsers will ship nonexperimental WebM-
enabled versions, and users will upgrade to those new versions. The anticipated codec
support is shown in Table 5-3.
Table 5-3. Video codec support in upcoming browsers
Codecs/Container
IE
Firefox
Safari
Chrome
Opera
iPhone
Android
Theora+Vorbis+Ogg
·
3.5+
·
5.0+
10.5+
·
·
H.264+AAC+MP4
·
·
3.0+
5.0+
·
3.0+
2.0+
WebM
9.0+
a
4.0+
·
6.0+
11.0+
·
b
a
Internet Explorer 9 will only support WebM “when the user has installed a VP8 codec”, which implies that Microsoft will not be shipping
the codec itself.
b
Google has committed to supporting WebM “in a future release” of Android, but there’s no firm timeline yet.
And now for the knockout punch....
Professor Markup Says
There is no single combination of containers and codecs that works in all HTML5
browsers.
This is not likely to change in the near future.
To make your video watchable across all of these devices and platforms, you’re going
to need to encode your video more than once.
For maximum compatibility, here’s what your video workflow will look like:
What Works on the Web | 89
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract bookmark & outlines. Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Insert images into PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add, edit, delete links. Form Process
pdf links; add links to pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. Hyperlink Edit. XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF
add hyperlink to pdf in; check links in pdf
1.Make one version that uses Theora video and Vorbis audio in an Ogg container.
2.Make another version that uses WebM (VP8 + Vorbis).
3.Make another version that uses H.264 Baseline video and AAC low-complexity
audio in an MP4 container.
4.Link to all three video files from a single 
<video>
element, and fall back to a Flash-
based video player.
Licensing Issues with H.264 Video
Before we continue, I need to point out that there is a cost to encoding your videos
twice. That is, in addition to the obvious cost—that you have to encode your videos
twice, which takes more computers and more time than just doing it once—there’s
another very real cost associated with H.264 video: licensing fees.
Remember when I first explained H.264 video (see “H.264” on page 84), and I men-
tioned that the video codec was patent-encumbered and licensing was brokered by the
MPEG LA consortium? That turns out to be kind of important. To understand why it’s
important, I direct you to the H.264 Licensing Labyrinth:*
MPEG LA splits the H.264 license portfolio into two sublicenses: one for manufacturers
of encoders or decoders and the other for distributors of content. [...]
The sublicense on the distribution side gets further split out to four key subcategories,
two of which (subscription and title-by-title purchase or paid use) are tied to whether
the end user pays directly for video services, and two of which (“free” television and
Internet broadcast) are tied to remuneration from sources other than the end viewer. [...]
The licensing fee for “free” television is based on one of two royalty options. The first is
a one-time payment of $2,500 per AVC transmission encoder, which covers one AVC
encoder “used by or on behalf of a Licensee in transmitting AVC video to the End User,”
who will decode and view it. If you’re wondering whether this is a double charge, the
answer is yes: A license fee has already been charged to the encoder manufacturer, and
the broadcaster will in turn pay one of the two royalty options.
The second licensing fee is an annual broadcast fee. [...] [T]he annual broadcast fee is
broken down by viewership sizes:
• $2,500 per calendar year per broadcast markets of 100,000–499,999 television
households
• $5,000 per calendar year per broadcast market of 500,000–999,999 television
households
• $10,000 per calendar year per broadcast market of 1,000,000 or more television
households
http://www.streamingmedia.com/Articles/Editorial/Featured-Articles/The-H.264-Licensing-Labyrinth-65403
.aspx.
90 | Chapter 5: Video on the Web
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Export PowerPoint hyperlink to PDF. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting PowerPoint to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
add hyperlinks to pdf; pdf link to attached file
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. Hyperlink Edit. XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; add hyperlink pdf
[...] With all the issues around “free” television, why should someone involved in non-
broadcast delivery care? As I mentioned before, the participation fees apply to any
delivery of content. After defining that “free” television meant more than just [over-the-
air], MPEG LA went on to define participation fees for Internet broadcasting as “AVC
video that is delivered via the Worldwide Internet to an end user for which the end user
does not pay remuneration for the right to receive or view.” In other words, any public
broadcast, whether it is [over-the-air], cable, satellite, or the Internet, is subject to par-
ticipation fees. [...]
The fees are potentially somewhat steeper for Internet broadcasts, perhaps assuming that
Internet delivery will grow much faster than OTA or “free” television via cable or satellite.
Adding the “free television” broadcast-market fee together with an additional fee, MPEG
LA grants a reprieve of sorts during the first license term, which ends on Dec. 31, 2010,
and notes that “after the first term the royalty shall be no more than the economic equiv-
alent of royalties payable during the same time for free television.”
That last part—about the fee structure for Internet broadcasts—has already been
amended. The MPEG LA recently announced that free Internet streaming would be
extended through December 31, 2015. And after that...who knows?
Encoding Ogg Video with Firefogg
(In this section, I’m going to use “Ogg video” as a shorthand for “Theora video and
Vorbis audio in an Ogg container.” This is the combination of codecs+container that
works natively in Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome.)
Firefogg is an open source, GPL-licensed Firefox extension for encoding Ogg video. To
use it, you’ll need to install Mozilla Firefox 3.5 or later, then visit the Firefogg
website, shown in Figure 5-1.
Click “Install Firefogg.” Firefox will prompt whether you really want to allow the site
to install an extension. Click “Allow” to continue (Figure 5-2).
Firefox will present the standard software installation window. Click “Install Now” to
continue (Figure 5-3).
Click “Restart Firefox” to complete the installation (Figure 5-4).
Once Firefox has restarted, the Firefogg website will confirm that Firefogg was suc-
cessfully installed (Figure 5-5).
Click “Make Ogg Video” to start the encoding process (Figure 5-6), then click “Select
file” to select your source video (Figure 5-7).
Encoding Ogg Video with Firefogg | 91
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. C#.NET Sample Code: Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET Project. Add necessary references:
adding links to pdf document; add a link to a pdf in preview
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Export PowerPoint hyperlink to PDF in .NET console application. C#.NET Demo Code: Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET Application. Add necessary references:
pdf reader link; add a link to a pdf in acrobat
Figure 5-1. Firefogg home page
Figure 5-2. Allow Firefogg to install
92 | Chapter 5: Video on the Web
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
Figure 5-3. Install Firefogg
Figure 5-4. Restart Firefox
Encoding Ogg Video with Firefogg | 93
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
Figure 5-5. Installation successful
Figure 5-6. Let’s make some video!
94 | Chapter 5: Video on the Web
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
Download from Library of Wow! eBook 
<www.wowebook.com>
Download from Library of Wow! eBook 
<www.wowebook.com>
Figure 5-7. Select your video file
The main Firefogg interface has six “tabs” (shown in Figure 5-8):
Presets
The default preset is “web video,” which is fine for our purposes.
Encoding range
Encoding video can take a long time. When you’re first getting started, you may
want to encode just part of your video (say, the first 30 seconds) until you find a
combination of settings you like.
Basic quality and resolution control
This is where most of the important options are.
Metadata
I won’t cover it here, but you can add metadata like title and author to your encoded
video. You’ve probably added metadata to your music collection with iTunes or
some other music manager. This is the same idea.
Advanced video encoding controls
Don’t mess with these unless you know what you’re doing. (Firefogg offers inter-
active help on most of these options. Click the “i” symbol next to each option to
learn more about it.)
Advanced audio encoding controls
Again, don’t mess with these unless you know what you’re doing.
Encoding Ogg Video with Firefogg | 95
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
Figure 5-8. Let’s encode a video
We’re only going to look at the “Basic quality and resolution control” tab (Fig-
ure 5-9), which contains all the important options:
Video Quality
This is measured on a scale of 0 (lowest quality) to 10 (highest quality). Higher
numbers mean bigger file sizes, so you’ll need to experiment to determine the best
size/quality ratio for your needs.
Audio Quality
This is measured on a scale of –1 (lowest quality) to 10 (highest quality). Higher
numbers mean bigger file sizes, just like with the video quality setting.
Video Codec
This should always be “theora.”
Audio Codec
This should always be “vorbis.”
Video Width and Video Height
These default to the actual width and height of your source video. If you want to
resize the video during encoding, you can change the width or height here. Firefogg
will automatically adjust the other dimension to maintain the original proportions,
so your video won’t end up smooshed or stretched.
In Figure 5-10, I resize the video to half its original width. Notice how Firefogg auto-
matically adjusts the height to match.
96 | Chapter 5: Video on the Web
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested