itextsharp add annotation to existing pdf c# : Chrome pdf from link application software cloud html windows azure class 14819-part1766

The first bit of markup within the outermost 
<article>
element is an 
<h1>
. This 
<h1>
element contains the name of a business, so we’ll put an 
itemprop="name"
attribute
directly on it:
<h1 itemprop="name">Google, Inc.</h1>
According to Table 10-1
<h1>
elements don’t need any special processing. The micro-
data property value is simply the text content of the 
<h1>
element. In English, we just
said: “The name of the Organization is ‘Google, Inc.’”
Next up is a street address. Marking up the address of an Organization works
exactly the same way as marking up the address of a Person. First, add an
itemprop="address"
attribute to the outermost element of the street address (in this
case, a 
<p>
element). That states that this is the 
address
property of the Organization.
But what about the properties of the address itself? We also need to define the 
item
type
and 
itemscope
attributes to say that this is an Address item that has its own
properties:
<p itemprop="address" itemscope
itemtype="http://data-vocabulary.org/Address">
Finally, we need to wrap each distinct piece of information in a dummy 
<span>
element
so we can add the appropriate microdata property name (
street-address
locality
,
region
postal-code
, and 
country-name
) on each 
<span>
element:
<p itemprop="address" itemscope
itemtype="http://data-vocabulary.org/Address">
<span itemprop="street-address">1600 Amphitheatre Parkway</span><br>
<span itemprop="locality">Mountain View</span>,
<span itemprop="region">CA</span>
<span itemprop="postal-code">94043</span><br>
<span itemprop="country-name">USA</span>
</p>
In English, we just said: “This Organization has an address. The street address part is
‘1600 Amphitheatre Parkway’. The locality is ‘Mountain View’. The region part is ‘CA’.
The postal code is ‘94043’. The name of the country is ‘USA’.”
Next up: a telephone number for the Organization. Telephone numbers are notoriously
tricky, and the exact syntax is country-specific. (And if you want to call another country,
it’s even worse.) In this example, we have a United States telephone number, in a format
suitable for calling from elsewhere in the United States:
<p itemprop="tel">650-253-0000</p>
(Hey, in case you didn’t notice, the Address vocabulary went out of scope when its
<p>
element was closed. Now we’re back to defining properties in the Organization
vocabulary.)
If you want to list several telephone numbers—maybe one for United States customers
and one for international customers—you can do that. Any microdata property can be
Marking Up Organizations | 177
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
Chrome pdf from link - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; pdf link
Chrome pdf from link - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add link to pdf acrobat; adding links to pdf document
repeated. Just make sure each telephone number is in its own HTML element, separate
from any label you may give it:
<p>
US customers: <span itemprop="tel">650-253-0000</span><br>
UK customers: <span itemprop="tel">00 + 1* + 6502530000</span>
</p>
According to Table 10-1, neither the 
<p>
element nor the 
<span>
element has special
processing. The value of the microdata 
tel
property is simply the text content. The
Organization microdata vocabulary makes no attempt to subdivide the different parts
of a telephone number. The entire 
tel
property is just freeform text. If you want to put
the area code in parentheses, or use spaces instead of dashes to separate the numbers,
you can do that. If a microdata-consuming client wants to parse the telephone number,
that’s entirely up to it.
Next, we have another familiar property: 
url
. Just like associating a URL with a Person
as described in the preceding section, you can associate a URL with an Organization.
This could be the company’s home page, a contact page, a product page, or anything
else. If it’s a URL about, from, or belonging to the Organization, mark it up with an
itemprop="url"
attribute:
<p><a itemprop="url" href="http://www.google.com/">Google.com</a></p>
According to Table 10-1, the 
<a>
element has special processing. The microdata prop-
erty value is the value of the 
href
attribute, not the link text. In English, this says: “This
organization is associated with the URL http://www.google.com/.” It doesn’t say
anything more specific about the association, and it doesn’t include the link text,
“Google.com.”
Finally, I want to talk about geolocation. No, not the W3C geolocation API (see Chap-
ter 6). I’m talking about how to mark up the physical location for an Organization using
microdata.
To date, all of our examples have focused on marking up visible data. That is, you have
an 
<h1>
with a company name, so you add an 
itemprop
attribute to the 
<h1>
element to
declare that the (visible) header text is, in fact, the name of an Organization. Or you
have an 
<img>
element that points to a photo, so you add an 
itemprop
attribute to the
<img>
element to declare that the (visible) image is a photo of a Person.
In this example, geolocation information isn’t like that. There is no visible text that
gives the exact latitude and longitude (to four decimal places!) of the Organization. In
fact, the sample Organization page without microdata has no geolocation information
at all. It has a link to Google Maps, but even the URL of that link does not contain
latitude and longitude coordinates. (It contains similar information in a Google-specific
format.) Even if we had a link to a hypothetical online mapping service that did take
latitude and longitude coordinates as URL parameters, microdata has no way of sep-
arating out the different parts of a URL. You can’t declare that the first URL query
178 | Chapter 10: “Distributed,” “Extensibility,” and Other Fancy Words
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
modern browsers, such as IE, Chrome, Firefox, and RasterEdge DocImage SDK for .NET link directly. RasterEdgeImagingDeveloperGuide8.0.pdf: from this user manual
adding hyperlinks to a pdf; add a link to a pdf file
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
supports multiple common browsers, such as IE, Chrome, Firefox, Safari information on them, just click the link and go VB.NET PDF Web Viewer, VB.NET PDF Windows
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; pdf edit hyperlink
parameter is the latitude, the second URL query parameter is the longitude, and the
rest of the query parameters are irrelevant.
To handle edge cases like this, HTML5 provides a way to annotate invisible data. This
technique should only be used as a last resort. If there is a way to display or render the
data you care about, you should do so. Invisible data that only machines can read tends
to “go stale” very quickly. That is, it’s likely that someone will come along later and
update the visible text but forget to update the invisible data. This happens more often
than you think, and it will happen to you too.
Still, there are cases where invisible data is unavoidable. Perhaps your boss really wants
machine-readable geolocation information but doesn’t want to clutter up the interface
with pairs of incomprehensible six-digit numbers. Invisible data is the only option. The
only saving grace here is that you can put the invisible data immediately after the visible
text that it describes, which may help remind the person who comes along later and
updates the visible text that she needs to update the invisible data right after it.
In this example, we can create a dummy 
<span>
element within the same 
<article>
element as all the other Organization properties, then put the invisible geolocation data
inside the 
<span>
element:
<span itemprop="geo" itemscope
itemtype="http://data-vocabulary.org/Geo">
<meta itemprop="latitude" content="37.4149" />
<meta itemprop="longitude" content="-122.078" />
</span>
</article>
Geolocation information is defined in its own vocabulary, like the address of a Person
or Organization. Therefore, this 
<span>
element needs three attributes:
itemprop="geo"
Says that this element represents the 
geo
property of the surrounding Organization.
itemtype="http://data-vocabulary.org/Geo"
Says which microdata vocabulary this element’s properties conform to.
itemscope
Says that this element is the enclosing element for a microdata item with its own
vocabulary (given in the 
itemtype
attribute). All the properties within this element
are properties of the Geo vocabulary (
http://data-vocabulary.org/Geo
), not the
surrounding  Organization  vocabulary  (
http://data-vocabulary.org/Organiza
tion
).
The next big question that this example answers is, “How do you annotate invisible
data?” You do this with the 
<meta>
element. In previous versions of HTML, you could
only use the 
<meta>
element within the 
<head>
of your page (see “The <head> Ele-
ment” on page 34). In HTML5, you can use the 
<meta>
element anywhere. And that’s
exactly what we’re doing here:
<meta itemprop="latitude" content="37.4149" />
Marking Up Organizations | 179
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Major browser supported, include chrome, firefox, ie, edge, safari, etc. Embed converted html files in html page or iframe. Export PDF form data to html form in
clickable links in pdf from word; pdf link to email
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Use JS (jquery) to control PDF page navigation. Cross browser supported, like chrome, firefox, ie, edge, safari. Embed zoom setting (fit page, fit width).
add url to pdf; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
According to Table 10-1, the 
<meta>
element has special processing. The microdata
property value is the 
content
attribute. Since this attribute is never visibly displayed,
we have the perfect setup for unlimited quantities of invisible data. With great power
comes great responsibility. In this case, the responsibility is on you to ensure that this
invisible data stays in sync with the visible text around it.
There is no direct support for the Organization vocabulary in Google Rich Snippets,
so I don’t have any pretty sample search result listings to show you. But organizations
feature heavily in the next two case studies, events and reviews, and those are supported
by Google Rich Snippets.
Marking Up Events
Stuff happens. Some stuff happens at predetermined times. Wouldn’t it be nice if you
could tell search engines exactly when stuff was about to happen? There’s an angle
bracket for that.
Let’s start by looking at a sample schedule of my speaking engagements:
<article>
<h1>Google Developer Day 2009</h1>
<img width="300" height="200"
src="http://diveintohtml5.org/examples/gdd-2009-prague-pilgrim.jpg"
alt="[Mark Pilgrim at podium]">
<p>
Google Developer Days are a chance to learn about Google
developer products from the engineers who built them. This
one-day conference includes seminars and "office hours"
on web technologies like Google Maps, OpenSocial, Android,
AJAX APIs, Chrome, and Google Web Toolkit.
</p>
<p>
<time datetime="2009-11-06T08:30+01:00">2009 November 6, 8:30</time>
&ndash;
<time datetime="2009-11-06T20:30+01:00">20:30</time>
</p>
<p>
Congress Center<br>
5th května 65<br>
140 21 Praha 4<br>
Czech Republic
</p>
<p><a href="http://code.google.com/intl/cs/events/developerday/2009/home.html">
GDD/Prague home page</a></p>
</article>
You can follow along online with the changes made throughout this
section.  Before: http://diveintohtml5.org/examples/event.html;  after:
http://diveintohtml5.org/examples/event-plus-microdata.html.
180 | Chapter 10: “Distributed,” “Extensibility,” and Other Fancy Words
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
various ASP.NET platforms. Support to view PDF document online in browser such as firefox, chrome, safari and so on. Support ASP.NET MVC
add hyperlinks to pdf online; clickable links in pdf
C# PDF Markup Drawing Library: add, delete, edit PDF markups in C#
A web based markup tool able to annotate PDF in browser such as chrome, firefox and safari in ASP.NET WebForm application. Support
check links in pdf; add hyperlink to pdf
All the information about the event is contained within the 
<article>
element, so that’s
where we need to put the 
itemtype
and 
itemscope
attributes:
<article itemscope itemtype="http://data-vocabulary.org/Event">
The URL for the Event vocabulary is http://data-vocabulary.org/Event, which also hap-
pens to contain a nice little chart describing the vocabulary’s properties. And what are
those properties? Table 10-4 lists them.
Table 10-4. Event vocabulary
Property
Description
summary
The name of the event.
url
A link to the event details page.
location
The location or venue of the event. Can optionally be represented by a nested Organization (see “Marking
Up Organizations” on page 176) or Address (see “Marking Up People” on page 171).
description
A description of the event.
startDate
The starting date and time of the event in ISO date format.
endDate
The ending date and time of the event in ISO date format.
duration
The duration of the event in ISO duration format.
eventType
The category of the event (for example, “Concert” or “Lecture”). This is a freeform string, not an enumerated
attribute.
geo
The geographical coordinates of the location. Always contains two subproperties, 
latitude
and
longitude
.
photo
A link to a photo or image related to the event.
The Event’s name is in an 
<h1>
element. According to Table 10-1, 
<h1>
elements have
no special processing. The microdata property value is simply the text content of the
<h1>
element. So, all we need to do is add the 
itemprop
attribute to declare that this
<h1>
element contains the name of the Event:
<h1 itemprop="summary">Google Developer Day 2009</h1>
In English, this says: “The name of this Event is ‘Google Developer Day 2009.’”
This event listing has a photo, which can be marked up with the 
photo
property. As
you would expect, the photo is already marked up with an 
<img>
element. Like
the 
photo
property  in  the  Person  vocabulary  (see “The Microdata Data
Model” on page 166), the 
Event
photo property is a URL. Since Table 10-1 says that
the property value of an 
<img>
element is its 
src
attribute, the only thing we need to do
is add the 
itemprop
attribute to the 
<img>
element:
<img itemprop="photo" width="300" height="200"
src="http://diveintohtml5.org/examples/gdd-2009-prague-pilgrim.jpg"
alt="[Mark Pilgrim at podium]">
Marking Up Events | 181
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
An ASP.NET web-server compliant library able to highlight text in PDF file online in browser such as chrome, firefox, safari, etc.
chrome pdf from link; active links in pdf
VB.NET Word: Create VB.NET Word Document Viewer in Web, Windows
in one of above mentioned VB.NET Word document viewers, please follow the link to see If needed, you can try VB.NET PDF document file viewer SDK, and VB.NET
add link to pdf; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
In English, this says: “The photo for this Event is at http://diveintohtml5.org/examples/
gdd-2009-prague-pilgrim.jpg.”
Next up is a longer description of the Event, which is just a paragraph of freeform text:
<p itemprop="description">Google Developer Days are a chance to
learn about Google developer products from the engineers who built
them. This one-day conference includes seminars and "office
hours" on web technologies like Google Maps, OpenSocial,
Android, AJAX APIs, Chrome, and Google Web Toolkit.</p>
The next bit is something new. Events generally occur on specific dates and start and
end at specific times. In HTML5, dates and times should be marked up with the
<time>
element (see “Dates and Times” on page 49), and we are already doing that here.
So the question becomes, how do we add microdata properties to these 
<time>
ele-
ments? Looking back at Table 10-1, we see that the 
<time>
element has special pro-
cessing. The value of a microdata property on a 
<time>
element is the value of the
datetime
attribute. And hey, the 
startDate
and 
endDate
properties of the Event vo-
cabulary take an ISO-style date, just like the 
datetime
property of a 
<time>
element.
Once again, the semantics of the core HTML vocabulary dovetail nicely with the se-
mantics of our custom microdata vocabulary. Marking up start and end dates with
microdata is as simple as:
1.Using HTML correctly in the first place (using 
<time>
elements to mark up dates
and times)
2.Adding a single 
itemprop
attribute:
<p>
<time itemprop="startDate" datetime="2009-11-06T08:30+01:00">2009 November 6, 8:30</time>
&ndash;
<time itemprop="endDate" datetime="2009-11-06T20:30+01:00">20:30</time>
</p>
In English, this says: “This Event starts on November 6, 2009, at 8:30 in the morning,
and goes until November 6, 2009, at 20:30 (times local to Prague, GMT+1).”
Next up is the 
location
property. The definition of the Event vocabulary says that this
can be either an Organization or an Address. In this case, the Event is being held at a
venue that specializes in conferences, the Congress Center in Prague. Marking it up as
an Organization allows us to include the name of the venue as well as its address.
First, let’s declare that the 
<p>
element that contains the address is the 
location
property
of the Event, and that this element is also its own microdata item that conforms to the
http://data-vocabulary.org/Organization
vocabulary:
<p itemprop="location" itemscope
itemtype="http://data-vocabulary.org/Organization">
Next, mark up the name of the Organization by wrapping the name in a dummy
<span>
element and adding an 
itemprop
attribute to the 
<span>
element:
<span itemprop="name">Congress Center</span><br>
182 | Chapter 10: “Distributed,” “Extensibility,” and Other Fancy Words
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Create Online TIFF Document Viewer
modern browsers, including IE, Chrome, Firefox, Safari more web viewers on PDF and Word <link href="RasterEdge_Imaging_Files/RasterEdge.css" rel="stylesheet"type
add a link to a pdf in acrobat; add links in pdf
C# Word: How to Create Word Online Viewer in C# Application
including IE (Internet Explorer), Chrome, Firefox, Safari you can go to PDF Web Viewer <link href="RasterEdge_Imaging_Files/RasterEdge.css" rel="stylesheet"type
add links to pdf file; c# read pdf from url
"name"
is defining a property in the Organization vocabulary, not the Event vocabulary.
The 
<p>
element defined the beginning of the scope of the Organization properties, and
that 
<p>
element hasn’t yet been closed with a 
</p>
tag. Any microdata properties we
define here are properties of the most recently scoped vocabulary. Nested vocabularies
are like a stack. We haven’t yet popped the stack, so we’re still talking about properties
of the Organization.
In fact, we’re going to add a third vocabulary onto the stack—an Address for the Or-
ganization for the Event:
<span itemprop="address" itemscope
itemtype="http://data-vocabulary.org/Address">
Once again, we want to mark up every piece of the address as a separate microdata
property, so we need a slew of dummy 
<span>
elements to hang our 
itemprop
attributes
onto (if I’m going too fast for you here, go back and read about marking up the address
of a Person (see “Marking Up People” on page 171) and marking up the address of an
Organization (see “Marking Up Organizations” on page 177)):
<span itemprop="street-address">5th května 65</span><br>
<span itemprop="postal-code">140 21</span>
<span itemprop="locality">Praha 4</span><br>
<span itemprop="country-name">Czech Republic</span>
There are no more properties of the Address, so we close the 
<span>
element that started
the Address scope and pop the stack:
</span>
There are also no more properties of the Organization, so we close the 
<p>
element that
started the Organization scope and pop the stack again:
</p>
Now we’re back to defining properties on the Event. The next property is 
geo
, to rep-
resent the physical location of the Event. This uses the same Geo vocabulary that we
used to mark up the physical location of an Organization in the previous section. We
need a 
<span>
element to act as the container; it gets the 
itemtype
and 
itemscope
at-
tributes. Within that 
<span>
element, we need two 
<meta>
elements, one for the
latitude
property and one for the 
longitude
property:
<span itemprop="geo" itemscope itemtype="http://data-vocabulary.org/Geo">
<meta itemprop="latitude" content="50.047893" />
<meta itemprop="longitude" content="14.4491" />
</span>
Because we’ve closed the 
<span>
that contained the Geo properties, we’re back to de-
fining properties on the Event. The last property is the 
url
property, which should look
familiar. Associating a URL with an Event works the same way as associating a URL
with a Person (see “Marking Up People” on page 173) and associating a URL with an
Organization (see “Marking Up Organizations” on page 178). If you’re using HTML
Marking Up Events | 183
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
correctly (marking up hyperlinks with 
<a href>
), declaring that the hyperlink is a mi-
crodata 
url
property is simply a matter of adding the 
itemprop
attribute:
<p>
<a itemprop="url"
href="http://code.google.com/intl/cs/events/developerday/2009/home.html">
GDD/Prague home page
</a>
</p>
</article>
The sample event page also lists a second event, my speaking engagement at the ConFoo
conference in Montreal. For brevity, I’m not going to go through that markup line by
line. It’s essentially the same as the event in Prague: an Event item with nested Geo and
Address items. I just mention it in passing to reiterate that a single page can have mul-
tiple events, each marked up with microdata.
The Return of Google Rich Snippets
According to Google’s Rich Snippets Testing Tool, this is the information that Google’s
crawlers will glean from our sample event listing page:
Item
Type: http://data-vocabulary.org/Event
summary = Google Developer Day 2009
eventType = conference
photo = http://diveintohtml5.org/examples/gdd-2009-prague-pilgrim.jpg
description = Google Developer Days are a chance to learn about Google developer 
products from the engineers who built them. This one-day
conference includes seminars and office hours on web technologies
like Goo...
startDate = 2009-11-06T08:30+01:00
endDate = 2009-11-06T20:30+01:00
location = Item(__1)
geo = Item(__3)
url = http://code.google.com/intl/cs/events/developerday/2009/home.html
Item
Id: __1
Type: http://data-vocabulary.org/Organization
name = Congress Center
address = Item(__2)
Item
Id: __2
Type: http://data-vocabulary.org/Address
street-address = 5th května 65
postal-code = 140 21
locality = Praha 4
country-name = Czech Republic
Item
Id: __3
184 | Chapter 10: “Distributed,” “Extensibility,” and Other Fancy Words
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
Type: http://data-vocabulary.org/Geo
latitude = 50.047893
longitude = 14.4491
As you can see, all the information we added in microdata is there. Properties that are
separate microdata items are given internal IDs (
Item(__1)
Item(__2)
, and so on), but
this is not part of the microdata specification. It’s just a convention that Google’s testing
tool uses to linearize the sample output and show you the grouping of nested items and
their properties.
So how might Google choose to represent this sample page in its search results? (Again,
I have to preface this with the disclaimer that this is just an example; Google may change
the format of its search results at any time, and there is no guarantee that Google will
even pay attention to your microdata markup.) It might look like Figure 10-2.
Figure 10-2. Sample search result for a microdata-enhanced Event listing
After the page title and autogenerated excerpt text, Google starts using the microdata
markup we added to the page to display a little table of events. Note the date format:
“Fri, Nov 6.” That is not a string that appeared anywhere in our HTML or microdata
markup. We used two fully qualified ISO-formatted strings, 
2009-11-06T08:30+01:00
and 
2009-11-06T20:30+01:00
. Google took those two dates, figured out that they were
on the same day, and decided to display a single date in a more friendly format.
Now look at the physical addresses. Google chose to display just the venue name +
locality + country, not the exact street address. This is made possible by the fact that
we split up the address into five subproperties—
name
street-address
region
,
locality
, and 
country-name
—and marked up each part of the address as a different
microdata property. Google takes advantage of that to show an abbreviated address.
Other consumers of the same microdata markup might make different choices about
what to display or how to display it. There’s no right or wrong choice here. It’s up to
you to provide as much data as possible, as accurately as possible. It’s up to the rest of
the world to interpret it.
Marking Up Reviews
Here’s another example of making the Web (and possibly search result listings) better
through markup: business and product reviews.
Marking Up Reviews | 185
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
This is a short review I wrote of my favorite pizza place near my house. (This is a real
restaurant, by the way. If you’re ever in Apex, NC, I highly recommend it.) Let’s look
at the original markup:
<article>
<h1>Anna's Pizzeria</h1>
<p>★★★★☆ (4 stars out of 5)</p>
<p>New York-style pizza right in historic downtown Apex</p>
<p>
Food is top-notch. Atmosphere is just right for a "neighborhood
pizza joint." The restaurant itself is a bit cramped; if you're
overweight, you may have difficulty getting in and out of your
seat and navigating between other tables. Used to give free
garlic knots when you sat down; now they give you plain bread
and you have to pay for the good stuff. Overall, it's a winner.
</p>
<p>
100 North Salem Street<br>
Apex, NC 27502<br>
USA
</p>
<p>— reviewed by Mark Pilgrim, last updated March 31, 2010</p>
</article>
You can follow along online with the changes made throughout this
section. Before: http://diveintohtml5.org/examples/review.html; after:
http://diveintohtml5.org/examples/review-plus-microdata.html.
This review is contained in an 
<article>
element, so that’s where we’ll put the
itemtype
and 
itemscope
attributes. Here’s the namespace URL for this vocabulary:
<article itemscope itemtype="http://data-vocabulary.org/Review">
What are the available properties in the Review vocabulary? I’m glad you asked. They’re
listed in Table 10-5.
Table 10-5. Review vocabulary
Property
Description
itemreviewed
The name of the item being reviewed. Can be a product, service, business, etc.
rating
A numerical quality rating for the item, on a scale from 1 to 5. Can also be a nested Rating using the
http://data-vocabulary.org/Rating
vocabulary to use a nonstandard scale.
reviewer
The name of the author who wrote the review.
dtreviewed
The date that the item was reviewed in ISO date format.
summary
A short summary of the review.
description
The body of the review.
186 | Chapter 10: “Distributed,” “Extensibility,” and Other Fancy Words
Download from Library of Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
Download from Library of Wow! eBook 
<www.wowebook.com>
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested