Implementation Timeline
Each of the three lab sessions is designed to be carried out in consecutive 50 min periods.
The detailed lab protocol can be found in the Student Manual.
Suggested laboratory schedule for the students
Day 1
Setting the Stage
Lecture and discussion
Student considerations 1–4
Day 2
Transformation Laboratory 
Transform cells and spread plates 
Student laboratory focus questions
Day 3
Data Collection and Analysis 
Observe transformants and controls
Analyze and interpret results
Student considerations
Day 4
Extension Activities
Calculate transformation efficiency
GFP chromatography kit
(catalog #166-0005EDU)
pGLO SDS-PAGE Extension kit
(catalog #166-0013EDU)
Safety Issues
Some countries outside the U.S. may require a special license to use this kit. Please refer to
your country’s legislative authorities for proper guidelines.
The 
Escherichia coli
bacteria HB101 K-12 strain contained in this kit is not a pathogenic
organism like the 
E. coli
strain O157 H7 that has sometimes been implicated in food poisoning.
HB101 K-12 has been genetically modified to prevent its growth unless grown on an
enriched medium. However, handling of the 
E. coli
K-12 strain requires the use of standard 
Microbiological Practices. These practices include, but are not limited to, the following.
Work surfaces are decontaminated once a day and after any spill of viable material. All 
contaminated liquid or solid wastes are decontaminated before disposal. All persons must
wash their hands: (i) after they handle material containing bacteria, and (ii) before exiting
the laboratory. All procedures are performed carefully to minimize the creation of aerosols.
Mechanical pipeting devices are used, mouth pipetting is prohibited; eating, drinking, 
smoking, and applying cosmetics are not permitted in the work area; wearing protective
eyewear and gloves is strongly recommended.
If an autoclave is not available, all solutions and components (loops and pipets) that have
come in contact with bacteria can be placed in a fresh 10% bleach solution for at least 
20 min for sterilization. A shallow pan of this solution should be placed at every lab station.
No matter what you choose, all used loops and pipets should be collected for sterilization.
Sterilize petri dishes by covering the agar with 10% bleach solution. Let the plate stand for
1 hr or more, and then pour excess plate liquid down the drain. Once sterilized, the agar
plates can be double bagged and treated as normal trash. Safety glasses are recommended
when using bleach solutions.
Ampicillin may cause allergic reactions or irritation to the eyes, respiratory system, and
skin. In case of contact with eyes, rinse immediately with plenty of water and seek medical
advice. Wear suitable protective clothing. Ampicillin is a member of the penicillin family of
antibiotics. Those with allergies to penicillin or to any other member of the penicillin family
of antibiotics should avoid contact with ampicillin.
5
Pdf link - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
clickable pdf links; change link in pdf file
Pdf link - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
accessible links in pdf; pdf link to email
Please obtain the Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) available from Bio-Rad by calling 
800-424-6723 in the United States, or see www.bio-rad.com for further information on
reagents in this kit. Please consult your local environmental health and safety regulations
for proper disposal.
Ultraviolet (UV) Lamps
Ultraviolet radiation can cause damage to eyes and skin. Shortwave UV light is more dam-
aging than long-wave UV light. The Bio-Rad UV lamp recommended for this module is long-
wave. If possible, use UV-rated safety glasses or goggles.
Lesson Points to Highlight
This section describes experimental and conceptual points which may prove challenging
to students. These points are extremely important to the overall outcome of the activity.
Instructors should alert their students' attention to these points, and when possible, 
demonstrate the technique before the students attempt the procedure.
The most important thing for students to do is to put the correct components in the correct
tubes and onto the correct plates. So, marking the tubes clearly and being prepared and
organized is crucial for a smooth execution of the experiment. The Quick Guide is provided
to organize the activity. This graphic laboratory protocol provides visual depictions of
all laboratory steps used in the transformation procedure.
General Laboratory Skills
Sterile Technique
With any type of microbiology technique (such as working with and culturing bacteria), it is
important not to introduce contaminating bacteria into the experiment. Because contaminating
bacteria are ubiquitous and are found on fingertips, benchtops, etc., it is important to avoid
these contaminating surfaces. When students are working with the inoculation loops, pipets,
and agar plates, you should stress that the round circle at the end of the loop, the tip of the
pipet, and the surface of the agar plate should not be touched or placed onto contaminating
surfaces. While some contamination will likely not ruin the experiment, students would benefit
from an introduction to the idea of sterile technique. Using sterile technique is also an issue of
human cleanliness and safety. 
Use of the Pipet
Before beginning the laboratory sessions, point out the graduations on the pipette to
the students. The 100 µl and 250 µl and 1 ml marks will be used as units of 
measurement throughout the labs.
1ml
1 ml
750 µl
500 µl
250 µl
100 µl
6
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
View & Process. XImage.Raster. Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.OCR. Microsoft Office. View & Process. XImage.Raster. Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.
add email link to pdf; pdf link to specific page
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
add hyperlink pdf document; pdf link open in new window
7
Decontamination and Disposal
If an autoclave is not available, all solutions and components (loops and pipets) that have
come in contact with bacteria can be placed in a fresh 10% bleach solution for at least 20 minfor
sterilization. A shallow pan of this solution should be placed at every lab station. No matter what
you choose, all used loops and pipets should be collected for sterilization. Sterilize petri dishes
by covering the agar with 10% bleach solution. Let it stand for 1 hr or more and then pour
excess plate liquid down the drain. Once sterilized, the agar plates can be double bagged and
treated as normal trash. Safety glasses are recommended when using bleach solutions. Please
consult your local environmental health and safety regulations for proper disposal. 
Incubation
This guide is written to reflect the use of a 37°C incubator. The transformation experiment
can be conducted without the use of an incubator, however, the number of days required to 
culture colonies to the optimum size depends on the ambient temperature. Best results are
obtained if starter plate colonies are fresh (24–36 hr growth) and measure about 1–1.5 mm in
diameter. Refrigeration of cultured plates will significantly lower transformation efficiency.
The optimum temperature for growing 
E. coli
is 37°C (98.6°F), and lower temperatureswill result
in a decreased growth rate. At 28°C (82°F), two days of incubation time are required to obtain
optimum colony size. At 21°C (70°F), three days of incubation time are required to obtain opti-
mum colony size. Adjust the advance preparation lead times and laboratory schedule accord-
ing to your incubation temperature.
Experimental Points – Optimizing Your pGLO Lab Experiment
Practicing Techniques
Some educators like to do a dry run of the procedures to explain sterile technique, practice
using the pipets and loops, and practice streaking and spreading bacteria on the agar’s surface.
You will have to decide what is best for your students based upon their laboratory experience
and familiarity with these techniques. Paying close attention to the following experimental
points will result in successful transformations.
Preparing 
E. coli
Starter (Agar) Plates
Best results are obtained when using a flask instead of a beaker to prepare the agar.
Ensure that the agar is completely dissolved as uneven mixing can result in agar that will not
solidify. Follow the directions in "Advance Preparation Step 1" closely to minimize introducing 
contaminants.
After the starter plates are streaked with 
E. coli
and incubated at 37°C, they should be
used within 24–36 hr. Delay beyond 36 hr will compromise transformation.
Transferring Bacterial Colonies from Agar Plates to Microtubes
The process of scraping a single colony off the starter plate leads to the temptation to
get more cells than needed. A single colony that is approximately 1 mm in diameter contains
millions of bacterial cells. To increase transformation efficiency, students should select 2–4
"fat" colonies that are 1–1.5 mm in diameter. Selecting more than 4 colonies may decrease
transformation efficiency. Select individual colonies rather than a swab of bacteria from the
dense portion of the plate; the bacteria must be actively growing for transformation to be
successful.
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
adding hyperlinks to pdf documents; pdf reader link
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add links in pdf; adding hyperlinks to pdf files
8
DNA Transfer
The transfer of plasmid DNA from its stock tube to the transformation suspension is crucial.
Students must look carefully at the loop to see if there is a film of plasmid solution across the
ring. This is similar to seeing a soapy film across a wire ring for blowing soap bubbles.
Optionally, the students may pipet 10 µl of the pGLO plasmid into the tube labelled "+pGLO"
and mix well.
Heat Shock
The procedure used to increase the bacterial uptake of foreign DNA is called heat shock.
It is important that students follow the directions regarding time. Also important is the rapid
temperature change and the duration of the heat shock. For optimal results, the tubes containing
the cell suspensions must be taken directly from ice, placed into the water bath at 42°C for 
50 sec and returned immediately to the ice. The absence of the heat shock will result in a 10-
fold decrease in transformants; 90 sec of heat shock will give about half as many transformants
as will 50 sec of heat shock. In both cases, the experiment will work, but it has been optimized at
50 sec of heat shock. Be sure to use crushed ice, instead of cubed ice for maximum transforma-
tion efficiency. Use two thermometers to check the temperature of the incubator to ensure accu-
racy.
Spreading Transformants and Controls
Delivering an excess of transformed culture to the plates with the disposable transfer
pipet is counterproductive because the plates may not absorb the additional liquid and
spreading will be uneven. Transferring bacterial suspensions from the microtubes to the
petri dishes requires some care. The bacteria will settle to the bottom, so the students can
hold the top of a closed tube between the index finger and thumb of one hand and flick the
bottom of the tube with the index finger of the other hand. Be sure that students tap the
tube with their finger or stir the suspension with the pipet before drawing it up. Also, make
sure that the students cover the petri dishes with lids immediately after pipetting in the transfor-
mation culture and spreading the cells. Spread the suspensions evenly around the surface
of the agar by quickly skating the flat surface of a new sterile loop back and forth across the
plate surface.
Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) Chromatography Kit
If you plan to follow the pGLO bacterial transformation experiment with the GFP 
purification kit (catalog #166-0005EDU), you must save the pGLO-transformed bacteria
grown on the LB/amp/ara plates. The best way to save the plates is to store them media-
side up in a cool place, such as a refrigerator. This will keep the cells alive but limit their
active growth until you need them to start the next experiment. Storing the plates upside
down prevents condensed moisture from smearing the colonies on the media.
Ideally, plates should be used within 2–4 weeks. For longer storage, make sure that the
plates are wrapped with Parafilm to prevent moisture loss.
Conceptual Points
Media
The liquid and solid nutrient media referred to as LB (named after Luria and Bertani)
nutrient broth and LB nutrient agar are made from an extract of yeast and an enzymatic
digest of meat byproducts, which provide a mixture of carbohydrates, amino acids,
nucleotides, salts, and vitamins, as nutrients for bacterial growth. Agar, isderived from sea-
weed. It melts when heated, forms a solid gel when cooled (analogousto Jello-O), and func-
tions to provide a solid support on which to culture bacteria.
C# Raster - Raster Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
add url link to pdf; pdf hyperlinks
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
Besides, here is the quick link for how to process Word document within We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add links pdf document; add a link to a pdf in acrobat
9
Antibiotic Selection
The pGLO plasmid, which contains the GFP gene, also contains the gene for beta-lactamase,
which provides resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin, a member of the penicillin family. The
beta-lactamase protein is produced and secreted by bacteria that contain the plasmid. 
Beta-lactamase inactivates the ampicillin present in the LB nutrient agar to allow bacterial
growth. Only transformed bacteria that contain the plasmid and express beta-lactamase can
grow on plates that contain ampicillin. Only a very small percentage of the cells take up the
plasmid DNA and are transformed. Untransformed cells cannot grow on the ampicillin selection
plates.  
Transformation Solution
It is postulated that the Ca2+cation of the transformation solution (50 mM CaCl
2
, pH 6.1)
neutralizes the repulsive negative charges of the phosphate backbone of the DNA and the
phospholipids of the cell membrane to allow the DNA to enter the cells.  
Heat Shock
The heat shock increases the permeability of the cell membrane to DNA. While the 
mechanism is not known, the duration of the heat shock is critical and has been optimized
for the type of bacteria used and the transformation conditions employed.
Recovery
The 10-min incubation period following the addition of LB nutrient broth allows the cells to
recover and to express the ampicillin resistance protein beta-lactamase so that the transformed
cells survive on the ampicillin selection plates.
The recovery culture can be incubated at room temperature or at 37°C for 1 hr to
overnight. This can increase the transformationefficiency by more than 10-fold.
pGLO Gene Regulation
Gene expression in all organisms is carefully regulated to allow adaptation to differing con-
ditions and to prevent wasteful overproduction of unneeded proteins. The genes involved in
the breakdown of different food sources are good examples of highly regulated genes. For
example, the simple plant sugar arabinose is a source of both energy and carbon for bacteria.
The bacterial genes that make digestive enzymes to break down arabinose for food are not
expressed when arabinose is not in the environment. But when arabinose is present, these
genes are turned on. When the arabinose runs out, the genes are turned off again.
Arabinose initiates transcription of these genes by promoting the binding of RNA 
polymerase. In the genetically engineered pGLO plasmid DNA, some of the genes involved
in the breakdown of arabinose have been replaced by the jellyfish gene that codes for
GFP. When bacteria that have been transformed with pGLO plasmid DNA are grown in the
presence of arabinose, the GFP gene is turned on, and the bacteria glow brilliant green
when exposed to UV light.
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
reading PDF document in ASP.NET web, .NET Windows Forms and mobile developing applications respectively. For more information on them, just click the link and
convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks; convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks
VB.NET Word: VB Code to Create Word Mobile Viewer with .NET Doc
For the respective tutorials of these Document or Image Mobile Viewer in VB.NET prorgam, please link to see: PDF Document Mobile Viewer within VB.NET
add hyperlinks to pdf; add hyperlinks pdf file
pGLO plasmid. Sequence and map are available at http://explorer.bio-rad.com under "Teaching Resources"
This is an excellent example of the central molecular framework of biology in action;
that is, DNA➔RNA➔PROTEIN➔TRAIT. When arabinose is absent from the growth media,
the GFP gene remains turned off and the colonies appear white. A more detailed description
and analysis of gene regulation and the function of the arabinose promoter can be found in
Appendix A.
pGLO
araC
GFP
bla
ori
10
11
Instructor's Advance Preparation Overview
This section outlines the recommended schedule for advance preparation on the part of
the instructor. The detailed advance preparation guide is provided on pages 13–17.
Teacher preparation
When
Time
Step 1
Read through the transformation manual
Immediately
1 hr
Make a copy of Student Manual and
Quick Guide for each student
Step 2
Prepare nutrient agar plates
3–7 days prior
1 hr
Step 3  Prepare starter plates, aliquot solutions
24–36 hr
30 min
Step 4
Organize student workstations
Immediately prior
10 min
Workstation (
) Checklist
Student workstations. Materials and supplies that should be present at each student
workstation prior to beginning the lab experiments are listed below. The components 
provided in this kit are sufficient for 8 complete student workstations.
Common workstation. A list of materials, supplies, and equipment that should be 
present at a common location accessible by all student groups is also listed below. It is up to
the discretion of the teacher as to whether students should access commonbuffer solutions
and equipment or whether the teacher should aliquot solutions in the microtubes provided.
Lesson 2  Transformation Lab
Student workstation
Material
Quantity
E. coli
starter plate (LB)
1
Poured agar plates (1 LB, 2 LB/amp, 1 LB/amp/ara)
4
Transformation solution
1
LB nutrient broth
1
Inoculation loops 
7 (1 pk of 10)
Pipets
5
Foam microtube holder/float
1
Containers (such as foam cups) full of crushed ice (not cubed ice)
1
Marking pen
1
Microcentrifuge tubes
2
Common workstation
Material
Quantity
Rehydrated pGLO plasmid DNA
1 vial
42°C water bath and thermometer
1
UV light
1
37°C incubator
1
(optional, see General Laboratory Skills–Incubation)
1
2–20 µl adjustable volume micropipets
1
2–20 µl micropipet tips
1
Lesson 3  Data Collection and Analysis
Student workstation
Material
Quantity
Incubated transformation and control  plates:
Set of 4
LB/amp/ara
1
LB/amp
2
LB
1
Common workstation
Material
Quantity
UV lamp
1–8
12
Instructor’s Advance Preparation Guide
Objectives
Time required
When
Step 1
Prepare agar plates
1 hr
3–7 days prior
Step 2
Rehydrate 
E. coli
2 min
24–36 hours prior
Streak starter plates
15 min
Rehydrate pGLO 
plasmid DNA 
2 min
Step 3
Aliquot solutions
10 min
Immediately prior
Set up workstations
10 min
Advance Preparation Step 1:  3–7 days before the Transformation
Laboratory
1.  Prepare nutrient agar (autoclave-free)
The agar plates should be prepared at least three days before the student experiment
is performed. They should be left out at room temperature for two days and then refrigerated
until they are to be used. The two days on the benchtop allows the agar to dry out (cure) 
sufficiently to readily take up the liquid transformation solution in student lesson 2.
To prepare the agar, add 500 ml of distilled water to a 1 L or larger Erlenmeyer flask.
Best results are obtained when using a flask, not a beaker. Add the entire contents of the
LB nutrient agar packet. Swirl the flask to dissolve the agar, and heat to boiling in a
microwave. Repeat heating and swirling about three times until all the agar is dissolved 
(no more clear specks swirl around), but be careful to allow the flask to cool a little
before swirling so that the hot medium does not boil over onto your hand. Uneven mixing of
the agar can result in agar not setting.
When all the agar is dissolved, allow the LB nutrient agar to cool so that the outside of
the flask is just comfortable to hold (50°C). While the agar is cooling, label the plates and
prepare the arabinose and ampicillin as outlined below (Step 3). Be careful not to let the
agar cool so much that it begins to solidify. Keeping the flask with molten agar in a 
waterbath set to 50°C can help prevent the agar from cooling too quickly.
A microwave is the best way to dissolve the agar but if one is not available, a hot plate
may be used. Take care not to boil to dryness and do simmer for 5–10 min after boiling to
sterilize it.
LB
NUTRIENT
 AGAR
13
Add water
Swirl
Add agar
packet
Microwave
to boiling
INSTRUCTOR'S ADVANCE
PREPARATION GUIDE
14
2.  Prepare arabinose and ampicillin
Note: Arabinose requires at least 10 min to dissolve—be patient.
Arabinose is shipped dry in a small vial. With a new sterile pipet, add 3 ml of 
transformation solution directly to the vial to rehydrate the sugar. Mix the vial; a vortexer
helps. (Transformation solution is being used here because it is a handy sterile solution.
Sterile water would work just as well.) Discard pipet after use.
Ampicillin is also shipped dry in a small vial. With a new sterile pipet, add 3 ml of 
transformation solution directly to the vial to rehydrate the antibiotic. (Transformation 
solution is being used here because it is a handy sterile solution. Sterile water would work
just as well).
Note: Excessive heat (>60°C) will destroy the ampicillin and the arabinose, but the 
nutrient agar solidifies at 27°C so one must carefully monitor the cooling of the agar and
then pour the plates from start to finish without interruption. Keeping the flask w/molten
agar in a waterbath set to 50°C can help prevent the agar from cooling too quickly. Excess
bubbles can be removed after all the plates are poured by briefly flaming the surface of
each plate with the flame of a Bunsen burner. After the plates are poured do not disturb
them until the agar has solidified. Pour excess agar in the garbage, not the sink. Wipe any
agar drips off of the sides of the plates.
3.  Label plates
The 40 supplied agar plates should be labelled with a permanent marker on the bottom
close to the edge. Do not label the lids. Label 16 plates LB, 16 plates LB/ampand 8 plates
LB/amp/ara.
1ml
Ampicillin
Arabinose
Transformation solution
Add 3 ml
Add 3 ml
INSTRUCTOR'S ADVANCE
PREPARATION GUIDE
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested