itextsharp add annotation to existing pdf c# : Add url to pdf control application system azure web page asp.net console 16600333-part1796

25
Lesson 3  Review Questions
What’s Glowing?
1 Recall what you observed when you shined the UV light source onto a sample of 
original pGLO plasmid DNA and de scribe your obser vations.
The plasmid sample did not fluoresce.
2. Which of the two possible sources of the fluorescence can now be eliminated? 
The pGLO plasmid DNA and the original bacteria can be eliminated from 
providing the fluorescent source.
3. What does this observation indicate about the source of the fluorescence?  
The source of fluorescence is probably from some protein that the plasmid
encodes.  
4. Describe the evidence that indicates whether your attempt at performing a genetic
transfor mation was successful or not successful.
A successful experiment will be represented by the presence of colonies on the
(+) pGLO LB/amp and (+) pGLO LB/amp/ara plates and the absence of colonies
on the (-) pGLO LB/amp plate. Moreover, the colonies on the LB/amp/ara plate
should fluoresce green.
An unsuccessful experiment will show an absence of colonies on the (+) pGLO
LB/amp and (+) pGLO LB/amp/ara plates. This could be a result of not adding a
loopful of plasmid to the (+) pGLO tube or not adding a colony of bacteria to the
(+) pGLO tube.
TEACHER’S ANSWER
GUIDE
Add url to pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink in pdf; add hyperlinks to pdf online
Add url to pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding hyperlinks to a pdf; clickable links in pdf from word
Lesson 3  Review Questions
The Interaction between Genes and Environment
Look again at your four plates. Do you observe some 
E. coli
growing on the LB plates
which do not contain ampicillin/arabinose?
Yes. The bacteria that did not receive the plasmid are growing on a plain LB plate.
1. From your results, can you tell if these bacteria are ampicillin resistant by looking at
them on the LB plate? Explain your answer.
No. You cannot tell if the bacteria are ampicillin resistant just by looking at them.
Both types of bacteria (those that are ampicillin resistant and those that are
ampicillin sensitive) look similar when cultured—think about the colonies on the
LB starter plate and the colonies on the +pGLO LB/amp plate.  
2. How would you change the bacteria’s environment to best tell if they are ampicillin
resistant?
The best test would be to take some of the bacteria growing on the LB plate and
streak them on an LB/amp plate. If the bacteria are viable on the LB/amp plate,
then they are resistant to ampicillin. If no bacterial colonies survive, then they
were not ampicillin resistant (they were ampicillin sensitive).
3. Very often an organism’s traits are caused by a combination of its genes and the 
environment it lives in. Think about the green color you saw in the genetically 
transformed bacteria:
a.  What two factors must be present in the bacteria’s environment for you to see the
green color? (Hint:  one factor is in the plate and the other factor is in how you look
at the bacteria).
The sugar arabinose in the agarose plate is needed to turn on the expression
of the GFP gene. The UV light is necessary to cause the GFP protein within
the bacteria to fluoresce.
b. What do you think each of the two environmental factors you listed above are
doing to cause the genetically transformed bacteria turn green?
The sugar arabinose turns on expression of the GFP gene by binding to a
regulatory protein, 
araC
, which sits on the P
BAD
promoter. When arabinose is
present, it binds to 
araC
, consequently changing the conformation of 
araC
which facilitates transcription of the gene by RNA polymerase (see detailed
description in Appendix D). When exposed to UV light, the electrons in
GFP’s chromophere are excited to a higher energy state. When they drop
down to a lower energy state they emit a longer wavelength of visible 
fluorrescent green light at 509 nm.
c. What advantage would there be for an organism to be able to turn on or off particular
genes in response to certain conditions?
Gene regulation allows for adaptation to differing conditions and prevents
wasteful overproduction of unneeded proteins. Good examples of highly
regulatable genes are the enzymes which break down carbohydrate food
sources. If the sugar arabinose is present in the growth medium it is beneficial
for bacteria to produce the enzymes necessary to catabolize the sugar
source. Conversely, if arabinose is not present in the nutrient media, it
would be very energetically wasteful to produce the enzymes to break down
arabinose. 
26
TEACHER’S ANSWER
GUIDE
C#: How to Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP) in HTML5 Viewer
License and Price. File Formats. PDF. Word. Excel. PowerPoint. Tiff. DNN (Dotnetnuke). Quick to Start. Add a Viewer Control on Open a File from a URL (HTTP, FTP).
add url pdf; add hyperlinks pdf file
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
addTab(_tabRedact); //add Tab "Sample new UserCommand("pdf"); _userCmdDemoPdf.addCSS( new customStyle({ background: "url('RasterEdge_Resource_Files/images
pdf email link; pdf hyperlink
27
Lesson 4  Extension Activity
1. Determining the total number of green fluorescent cells.
Place your LB/amp/ara plate near a UV light source. Each colony on the plate can be
assumed to be derived from a single cell. As individ ual cells reproduce, more and more
cells are formed and develop into what is termed a colony. The most direct way to
determine the total number of green fluorescent cells is to count the colonies on the
plate.
Enter that number here 
2. Determining the amount of pGLO plasmid DNA in the bacterial cells spread on
the LB/amp/ara plate.  
We need two pieces of information to find out the amount of DNA (pGLO) in the bacterial
cells spread on the LB/amp/ara plate in this ex periment. (i) What was the to tal amount
of DNA we began the experiment with, and (ii) What fraction of DNA (in the bacteria)
actually got spread onto the LB/amp/ara plates. 
After you calculate this data, you will need to multiply the total amount of pGLO 
plasmid DNA usedin this experi ment by the fraction of DNA you spread on the
LB/amp/ara plate. The answer to this multiplication will tell you the amount of pGLO
plasmid DNA in the bacterial cells that were spread on the LB/amp/ara plate.
a.  Determining the total amount of DNA
The total amount of pGLO plasmid DNA we began with is equal to the product of the 
concentration and the total volume used, or
DNA (µg)  =  (concentration of DNA (µg/µl)  x  (volume of DNA in µl)
In this experiment you used 10 µl of pGLO at a concentration of 0.08 µg/µl. This means
that each microliter of solution contained 0.08 µg of pGLO DNA. Calculate the total
amount of DNA used in this experiment.
Enter that number here 
How will you use this piece of information?
This number will be multiplied by the fraction of DNA used in order to determine
the total amount of DNA spread on the agar plate.  
Total amount of DNA (µg) 
used in this experiment.=
0.8    
Total number of cells = 
190   
TEACHER’S ANSWER
GUIDE
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
add url link to pdf; add link to pdf acrobat
C# Image: How to Download Image from URL in C# Project with .NET
Add this imaging library to your C#.NET project jpeg / jpg, or bmp image from a URL to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add link to pdf file; adding a link to a pdf in preview
28
b. Determining the fraction of pGLO plasmid DNA (in the bacteria) that actually got
spread onto the LB/amp/ara plate. Since not all the pGLO plasmid DNA you added
to the bacte rial cells will be transferred to the agar plate, you need to find out what frac-
tion of the DNA was actu ally spread onto the LB/amp/ara plate. To do this, divide the
vol ume of DNA you spread on the LB/amp/ara plate by the total vol ume of liquid in the
test tube containing the DNA. A formula for this statement is:
Fraction of DNA used  =  Volume spread on LB/amp plate
Total volume in test tube  
You spread 100 µl of cells containing pGLO DNA from a test tube containing a total vol-
ume of 510 µl of solution. Do you remember why there is 510 µl total solution? Look in
the labo ratory procedure and locate all the steps where you added liquid to the reaction
tube. Add the volumes.
Use the above formula to calculate the fraction of DNA you spread on the LB/amp/ara
plate.
Enter that number here  
• How will you use this piece of information?
This number will be multiplied by the amount of DNA used to calculate the
amount of DNA spread on an agar plate. 
So, how many micrograms of DNA did you spread on the LB/amp/ara plates?
To answer this question, you will need to multiply the total amount of DNA used in this
experiment by the fraction of DNA you spread on the LB/amp/ara plate.
pGLO DNA spread (µg)  =  Total amount of DNA used (µg)  x  fraction of DNA
Enter that number here 
• What will this number tell you?
This number tells you how much DNA was spread on the agar plate.
pGLO
DNA spread (µg) =
0.16
Fraction of DNA =
0.2
TEACHER’S ANSWER
GUIDE
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
pdf reader link; add a link to a pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
check links in pdf; add hyperlink to pdf online
Look at all your calculations above. Decide which of the numbers you calculated belong
in the table below. Fill in the following table:
Number of colonies on LB/amp/ara plate
190
Micrograms of pGLO DNA spread on the plates 0.16 µg
Now use the data in the table to calculate the efficiency of the pGLO transformation
Transformation efficiency =     Total number of cells growing on the agar plate
Amount of DNA spread on the agar plate
Enter that number here 
Analysis
Transformation efficiency calculations result in very large numbers. Scientists often use
a mathematical shorthand referred to as scientific notation. For example, if the calculated
trans formation efficiency is 1,000 bacteria/µg of DNA, they often report this number as:
103 transformants/µg  (103 is another way of saying  10 x 10 x 10 or 1,000)
• How would scientists report 10,000 transformants/µg in scientific notation?
104
Carrying this idea a little farther, suppose scientists calculated an efficiency of 5,000
bacteria/µg of DNA. This would be reported as:
5.0 x 103 transformants/µg      
(5 times 1,000)
• How would scientists report 40,000 transformants/µg in scientific notation?
4.0 x 104
29
1187 transformants/µg
Tranformation
efficiency
TEACHER’S ANSWER
GUIDE
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
adding links to pdf in preview; add links to pdf file
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Download and Save Image from Web URL
Apart from image downloading from web URL, RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK still dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add links to pdf; pdf links
TEACHER’S ANSWER
GUIDE
One final example: If 2,600 transformants/µg were calculated, then the scientific nota-
tion for this number would be:
2.6 x 103 transformants/µg    (2.6 times 1,000)
Similarly:
5,600 = 5.6 x 103
271,000 = 2.71 x 105
2,420,000 = 2.42 x 106
• How would scientists report 960,000 transformants/µg in scientific notation?
9.6 x 105
• Report your calculated transformation efficiency in scientific notation.
1.2 x 103
transformants/µg
• Use a sentence or two to explain what your calculation of transformation efficiency
means:
Transformation efficiency is a quantitative value that describes how effective
you were at getting a plasmid into bacteria. The number represents the number
of transformed colonies produced per microgram of DNA added.
Biotechnologists are in general agreement that the transformation protocol that you have
just com pleted generally has a transformation efficiency of between 8.0 x 102 and 7.0 x 103
transformants per microgram of DNA.
• How does your transformation efficiency compare with the above?
The calculated efficiency (1.2 x 103) is within the predicted limits of efficiency for
this protocol.
• In the table below, report the transformation efficiency of several of the teams in the
class. 
Team
Efficiency
Answers will vary
• How does your transformation efficiency compare with theirs?
Answers will vary.
30
• Calculate the transformation efficiency of the following experiment using the information
and the results listed below.
DNA plasmid concentration—0.08 µg/µl
250 µl CaCl2 transformation solution
10 µl plasmid solution
250 µl LB nutrient broth
100 µl cells spread on agar
227 colonies of transformants counted
Fill in the following chart and show your calculations to your teacher.
Number of colonies on LB/amp/ara plate
227
Micrograms of DNA spread on the plates
0.16
Transformation efficiency
1.4 x 103
• Extra Credit Challenge  
If a particular experiment were known to have a transformation efficiency of 3 x 103
bacte ria/µg of DNA, how many transformant colonies would be expected to grow on the
LB/amp/ara plate? You can assume that the concentration of DNA and fraction of cells
spread on the LB agar are the same as that of the pGLO laboratory.
Transformation efficiency = # colonies/DNA spread on plate (µg)
3.0 x 103 = X/0.16
(3.0 x 103)(0.16) = X
480 = X
480 transformant colonies
31
TEACHER’S ANSWER
GUIDE
Student Manual
pGLO Transformation
Lesson 1  Introduction to Transformation
In this lab you will perform a procedure known as genetic transformation. Remember
that a gene is a piece of DNA which provides the instructions for making (codes for) a 
protein. This protein gives an organism a particular trait. Genetic transformation literally
means “change caused by genes,” and involves the insertion of a gene into an organism
in order to change the organism’s trait. Genetic transformation is used in many areas of
biotechnology. In agriculture, genes coding for traits such as frost, pest, or spoilage 
resistance can be genetically transformed into plants. In bioremediation, bacteria can be 
genetically transformed with genes enabling them to digest oil spills. In medicine, diseases
caused by defective genes are beginning to be treated by gene therapy; that is, by genetically
transforming a sick person’s cells with healthy copies of the defective gene that causes
the disease.
You will use a procedure to transform bacteria with a gene that codes for Green
Fluorescent Protein (GFP). The real-life source of this gene is the bioluminescent jellyfish
Aequorea victoria
. Green Fluorescent Protein causes the jellyfish to fluoresce and glow in
the dark. Following the transformation procedure, the bacteria express their newly acquired
jellyfish gene and produce the fluorescent protein, which causes them to glow a brilliant
green  color under ultraviolet light.
In this activity, you will learn about the process of moving genes from one organism to
another with the aid of a plasmid. In addition to one large chromosome, bacteria naturally
contain one or more small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids. Plasmid DNA usually
contains genes for one or more traits that may be beneficial to bacterial survival. In nature,
bacteria can transfer plasmids back and forth allowing them to share these beneficial
genes. This natural mechanism allows bacteria to adapt to new environments. The recent
occurrence of bacterial resistance to antibiotics is due to the transmission of plasmids.
Bio-Rad’s unique pGLO plasmid encodes the gene for GFP and a gene for resistance to
the antibiotic ampicillin. pGLO also incorporates a special gene regulation system, which can
be used to control expression of the fluorescent protein in transformed cells. The gene for GFP
can be switched on in transformedcells by adding the sugar arabinose to the cells’ nutrient
medium. Selection for cells that have been transformed with pGLO DNA is accomplished by
growth on ampillicin plates. Transformed cells will appear white (wild-type phenotype) on
plates not containing arabinose, and fluorescent green under UV light when arabinose is
included in the nutrient agar medium. 
You will be provided with the tools and a protocol for performing genetic transformation.  
Your task will be to:
1. Do the genetic transformation.
2. Determine the degree of success in your efforts to genetically alter an organism. 
32
STUDENT MANUAL
LESSON 1
Lesson 1  Focus Questions
There are many considerations that need to be thought through in the process of 
planning a scientific laboratory investigation. Below are a few for you to ponder as you take
on the challenge of doing a genetic transformation. 
Since scientific laboratory investigations are designed to get information about a
question, our first step might be to formulate a question for this investigation.
Consideration 1:  Can I Genetically Transform an Organism? Which Organism? 
1.  To genetically transform an entire organism, you must insert the new gene into every
cell in the organism. Which organism is better suited for total genetic transformation—
one composed of many cells, or one composed of a single cell?
2.  Scientists often want to know if the genetically transformed organism can pass its new
traits on to its offspring and future generations. To get this information, which would be a
better candidate for your investigation, an organism in which each new generation 
develops and reproduces quickly, or one which does this more slowly?
3.  Safety is another important consideration in choosing an experimental organism. What
traits or characteristics should the organism have (or not have) to be sure it will not
harm you or the environment?
4.  Based on the above considerations, which would be the best choice for a genetic 
transformation: a bacterium, earthworm, fish, or mouse? Describe your reasoning. 
33
STUDENT MANUAL
LESSON 1
Consideration 2:  How Can I Tell if Cells Have Been Genetically Transformed?
Recall that the goal of genetic transformation is to change an organism’s traits,
also known as their phenotype. Before any change in the phenotype of an organism
can be detected, a thorough examination of its natural (pre-transformation) phenotype
must be made. Look at the colonies of 
E. coli 
on your starter plates. List all observable
traits or characteristics that can be described:
The following pre-transformation observations of 
E. coli
might provide baseline data to
make reference to when attempting to determine if any genetic transformation has
occurred.
a) Number of colonies
b) Size of :
1) the largest colony
2) the smallest colony
3) the majority of colonies
c) Color of the colonies
d) Distribution of the colonies on the plate
e) Visible appearance when viewed with ultraviolet (UV) light
f) The ability of the cells to live and reproduce in the presence of an antibiotic such as
ampicillin
1. Describe how you could use two LB/agar plates, some 
E. coli
and some ampicillin to
determine how 
E. coli
cells are affected by ampicillin.  
2. What would you expect your experimental results to indicate about the effect of 
ampicillin on the 
E. coli
cells?
34
STUDENT MANUAL
LESSON 1
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested