itextsharp add annotation to existing pdf c# : Add page number to pdf hyperlink SDK Library API wpf asp.net windows sharepoint 16600335-part1798

Lesson 3  Review Questions
Name _____________________
What’s Glowing?
If a fluorescent green color is observed in the 
E. coli
colonies then a new question
might well be raised, “What are the two possible sources of fluorescence within the
colonies when exposed to UV light?”
Explain:
1. Recall what you observed when you shined the UV light onto a sample of original
pGLO plasmid DNA and describe your observations.
2. Which of the two possible sources of the fluorescence can now be eliminated?
3. What does this observation indicate about the source of the fluorescence?  
4. Describe the evidence that indicates whether your attempt at performing a genetic
transformation was successful or not successful.
45
STUDENT MANUAL
LESSON 3
Add page number to pdf hyperlink - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add links in pdf; add hyperlink pdf
Add page number to pdf hyperlink - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
clickable links in pdf; add hyperlink pdf document
Lesson 3  Review Questions
Name ____________________
The Interaction between Genes and Environment
Look again at your four plates. Do you observe some 
E. coli
growing on the LB plate that
does not contain ampicillin or arabinose?
1. From your results, can you tell if these bacteria are ampicillin resistant by looking at
them on the LB plate?  Explain your answer.
2. How would you change the bacteria’s environment—the plate they are growing on—to
best tell if they are ampicillin resistant?
3. Very often an organism’s traits are caused by a combination of its genes and its environment.
Think about the green color you saw in the genetically transformed bacteria:
a. What two factors must be present in the bacteria’s environment for you to see the
green color? (Hint:  one factor is in the plate and the other factor is in how you look
at the bacteria).
b. What do you think each of the two environmental factors you listed above are
doing to cause the genetically transformed bacteria to turn green?
c. What advantage would there be for an organism to be able to turn on or off particular
genes in response to certain conditions?
46
STUDENT MANUAL
LESSON 3
Lesson 4  Extension Activity:  Calculate Transformation Efficiency
Your next task in this investigation will be to learn how to determine the extent to which
you genetically transformed 
E. coli
cells. This quantitative measurement is referred to as
the transformation efficiency.  
In many experiments, it is important to genetically transform as many cells as possible. For
example, in some types of gene therapy, cells are collected from the patient, transformed in
the laboratory, and then put back into the patient. The more cells that are transformed to pro-
duce the needed protein, the more likely that the therapy will work. The transformation efficien-
cy is calculated to help scientists determine how well the transformation is working.
The Task
You are about to calculate the transformation efficiency, which gives you an indication
of how effective you were in getting DNA molecules into bacterial cells. Transformation effi-
ciency is a number. It represents the total number of bacterial cells that express the green
protein, divided by the amount of DNA used in the experiment. (It tells us the total number
of bacterial cells transformed by one microgram of DNA.) The transformation 
efficiency is calculated using the following formula:
Transformation efficiency =     Total number of colonies growing on the agar plate
Amount of DNA spread on the agar plate (in µg)
Therefore, before you can calculate the efficiency of your transformation, you will need
two pieces of information:
(1) The total number of green fluorescent colonies growing on your LB/amp/ara
plate.
(2) The total amount of pGLO plasmid DNA in the bacterial cells spread on the
LB/amp/ara plate.
47
STUDENT MANUAL
LESSON 4
1.  Determining the Total Number of Green Fluorescent Cells 
Place your LB/amp/ara plate near a UV light. Each colony on the plate can be assumed to
be derived from a single cell. As individual cells reproduce, more and more cells are formed
and develop into what is termed a colony. The most direct way to determine the total number
of bacteria that were transformed with the pGLO plasmidis to count the colonies on
the plate.
Enter that number here 
2.  Determining the Amount of pGLO DNA in the Bacterial Cells Spread on the
LB/amp/ara Plate  
We need two pieces of information to find out the amount of pGLO DNA in the bacterial
cells spread on the LB/amp/ara plate in this experiment. (a) What was the total amount of
DNA we began the experiment with, and (b) What fraction of the DNA (in the bacteria) 
actually got spread onto the LB/amp/ara plates. 
Once you calculate this data, you will multiply the total amount of pGLO DNA used in this
experiment by the fraction of DNA you spread on the LB/amp/ara plate. This will tell you
the amount of pGLO DNA in the bacterial cells that were spread on the LB/amp/ara plate.
a.  Determining the Total Amount of pGLO plasmid DNA
The total amount of DNA we began with is equal to the product of the concentra-
tion and the total volume used, or
(DNA in µg)  =  (concentration of DNA in µg/µl)  x  (volume of DNA in µl)
In this experiment you used 10 µl of pGLO at concentration of 0.08 µg/µl. This
means that each microliter of solution contained 0.08 µg of pGLO DNA. Calculate
the total amount of DNA used in this experiment.
Enter that number here 
How will you use this piece of information?
48
Total number of colonies =
_______
Total amount of pGLO DNA (µg)
used in this experiment =
___________________________
STUDENT MANUAL
LESSON 4
b. Determining the fraction of pGLO plasmid DNA (in the bacteria) that actually got spread
onto the LB/amp/ara plate:Since not all the DNA you added to the bacterial cells will be trans-
ferred to the agar plate, you need to find out what fraction of the DNA was actually spread onto
the LB/amp/ara plate. To do this, divide the volume of DNA you spread on the LB/amp/ara plate
by the total volume of liquid in the test tube containing the DNA. A formula for this statement is
Volume spread on LB/amp plate (µl)
Total sample volume in test tube (µl)
You spread 100 µl of cells containing DNA from a test tube containing a total volume of 
510 µl of solution. Do you remember why there is 510 µl total solution? Look in the laboratory
procedure and locate all the steps where you added liquid to the reaction tube. Add the volumes.
Use the above formula to calculate the fraction of pGLO plasmid DNA you spread on
the LB/amp/ara plate.
Enter that number here  
• How will you use this piece of information?
So, how many micrograms of pGLO DNA did you spread on the LB/amp/ara plates?
To answer this question, you will need to multiply the total amount of pGLO DNAused
in this experiment by the fraction of pGLO DNA you spread on the LB/amp/ara plate.
pGLO DNA spread in µg  =  Total amount of DNA used in µg  x  fraction of DNA used
Enter that number here 
• What will this number tell you?
49
Fraction of DNA used  =  
Fraction of DNA =
________
pGLO DNA spread (µg) =
________
STUDENT MANUAL
LESSON 4
Look at all your calculations above. Decide which of the numbers you calculated belong
in the table below. Fill in the following table.
Now use the data in the table to calculate the efficiency of the pGLO transformation
Transformation efficiency =      Total number of colonies growing on the agar plate
Amount of DNA spread on the agar plate (in µg)
Enter that number here 
Analysis
Transformation efficiency calculations result in very large numbers. Scientists often use
a mathematical shorthand referred to as scientific notation. For example, if the calculated
transformation efficiency is 1,000 bacteria/µg of DNA, they often report this number as:
103transformants/µg
(103is another way of saying 10 x 10 x 10 or 1,000)
• How would scientists report 10,000 transformants/µg in scientific notation?
Carrying this idea a little farther, suppose scientists calculated an efficiency of 5,000
bacteria/µg of DNA. This would be reported as:
5 x 103 transformants/µg
(5 x 1,000)
• How would scientists report 40,000 transformants/µg in scientific notation?
Number of colonies on
LB/amp/ara plate =
Micrograms of pGLO DNA
spread on the plates
50
Transformation efficiency =
_____ transformants/µg
STUDENT MANUAL
LESSON 4
One final example:  If 2,600 transformants/µg were calculated, then the scientific notation
for this number would be:
2.6 x 103transformants/µg
(2.6 x 1,000)
Similarly:
5,600 = 5.6 x 103
271,000 =  2.71 x 105
2,420,000 = 2.42 x 106
• How would scientists report 960,000 transformants/µg in scientific notation?
• Report your calculated transformation efficiency in scientific notation.
• Use a sentence or two to explain what your calculation of transformation efficiency
means.
Biotechnologists are in general agreement that the transformation protocol that you
have just completed generally has a transformation efficiency of between 8.0 x 102and 
7.0 x 103 transformants per microgram of DNA.
• How does your transformation efficiency compare with the above?
• In the table below, report the transformation efficiency of several of the teams in the
class.
Team
Efficiency
• How does your transformation efficiency compare with theirs?
51
STUDENT MANUAL
LESSON 4
• Calculate the transformation efficiency of the following experiment using the information
and the results listed below.
DNA plasmid concentration: 0.08 µg/µl
250 µl CaCl
2
transformation solution
10 µl pGLO plasmid solution
250 µl LB broth
100 µl cells spread on agar
227 colonies of transformants
Fill in the following chart and show your calculations to your teacher:
• Extra Credit Challenge:
If a particular experiment were known to have a transformation efficiency of 3 x 103
bacteria/µg of DNA, how many transformant colonies would be expected to grow on the
LB/amp/ara plate? You can assume that the concentration of DNA and fraction of cells
spread on the LB agar are the same as that of the pGLO laboratory.
Number of colonies on LB/amp/ara plate =
Micrograms of DNA spread on the plates =
Transformation efficiency =
52
STUDENT MANUAL
LESSON 4
Appendix A 
Historical Links to Biotechnology
Biological transformation has had an interesting history. In 1928, Frederick Griffith, a
London physician working in a pathology laboratory, conducted an experiment that he
would never be able to fully interpret as long as he lived. Griffith permanently changed
(transformed) a safe, nonpathogenic bacterial strain of pneumococcus into a deadly
pathogenic strain. He accomplished this amazing change in the bacteria by treating the
safe bacteria with heat-killed deadly bacteria. In this mixture of the two bacterial strains
there were no living, virulent bacteria, but the mixture killed the mice it was injected into. He
repeated the experiment many times, always with the same results. He and many of his 
colleagues were very perplexed. What transformed safe bacteria into the deadly killers?
Many years later, this would come to be known as the first recorded case of biological
transformation conducted in a laboratory, and no one could explain it. Griffith did not know
of DNA, but knew the transformation was inheritable. As any single point in history can be,
Griffith’s experiments in transformation can be seen as the birth of analytical genetic
manipulation that has led to recombinant DNA and biotechnology, and the prospects for
human gene manipulation.  
In 1944, sixteen years after Griffith’s experiment, a research group at Rockefeller
Institute, led by Oswald T. Avery, published a paper that came directly from the work of
Griffith. “What is the substance responsible?” Avery would ask his coworkers. Working with
the same strains of pneumonia-causing bacteria, Avery and his coworkers provided a 
rigorous answer to that question. They proved that the substance is DNA, and that biological
transformation is produced when cells take up and express foreign DNA. Although it took
many years for credit to be given to Avery, today he is universally acknowledged for this
fundamental advance in biological knowledge. Building upon the work of Avery and others,
Douglas Hanahan developed the technique of colony transformation used in this 
investigation.1, 2
Historical Context
Genetic Transformation
1865—Gregor Johann Mendel: Mendel presented his findings describing the principles by
which genetic traits are passed from parent to offspring. From his work the concept of
the gene as the basic unit of heredity was derived.  
1900—Carl Correns, Hugo De Vries, Erich Tschermak: Plant geneticists conducting 
inheritance studies uncovered that their work was essentially a duplicate of work 
performed nearly four decades earlier by an unknown Austrian Augustinian monk,
Gregor Johann Mendel, who studied peas.
1928—Frederick Griffith: Griffith transformed nonpathogenic 
Diplococcus pneumonia
into
pathogenic bacteria using heat-killed virulent bacteria. He suggested that the transforming
factor had something to do with the polysaccharide capsule synthesis. Griffith did not
know of DNA, but knew the transformation was inheritable. Griffith’s experiments in
transformation can be seen as the birth of analytical genetic manipulation that has led to
recombinant DNA technology and the prospects for human gene manipulation.
53
APPENDIX A
1944—Oswald Avery, Colin MacLeod:  Avery and his colleagues announced that they had
isolated the transforming factor to a high purity, and it was DNA. Since this classic 
experiment in molecular genetics, transformation, conjugation (bacterial mating), and
transduction (viral DNA transfer) have been used to transfer genes between species of
bacteria, 
Drosophila
, mice, plants and animals, mammalian cells in culture, and for
human gene therapy.  
1952—Alfred Hershey, Martha Chase: Hershey and Chase used radioisotopes of sulfur
and phosphorus, and bacteriophage T2 to show conclusively that DNA was the 
information molecule of heredity. Along with the work of Avery, MacLeod, and McCarty,
the Hershey/Chase experiment sealed the understanding that DNA was the transforming
material and the information molecule of heredity.
1972—Paul Berg, Janet Mertz: Berg used the newly discovered endonuclease enzyme,
Eco
RI, to cut SV40 DNA and bacteriophage P22 DNA, and then used terminal transferase
enzyme and DNA ligase to rejoin these separate pieces into one piece of DNA.
Creation of the first recombinant DNA molecule was the beginning of the age of
biotechnology. The new molecule was not placed inside a mammalian cell because of
concerns in the scientific community regarding genetic transfers.
1973—Herbert Boyer, Stanley Cohen, Annie Chang: Berg, Boyer, and Cohen used
Eco
RI to isolate an intact gene for kanamycin resistance. Boyer, Cohen, and
Chang spliced the kanamycin resistance gene into an 
Eco
RI cut plasmid that
already contained tetracycline resistance and produced a recombinant bacterial
plasmid molecule with dual antibiotic resistance. They then transformed
E. coli
with this engineered plasmid.
1977—Genentech, Inc.: The first product of genetic engineering, the gene for human 
somatostatin (human growth hormone-releasing inhibitory factor), was expressed in 
bacteria and announced by Genentech.
1980—J. W. Gordon, Frank Ruddle: Gordon and Ruddle successfully microinjected normal
genes into mouse germ-line cells.
1982—Richard Palmiter, Ralph Brinster: Palmiter and Brinster microinjected the gene for
rat growth hormone into mice embryos. This was the first genetic germ-line “cure” reported
in a mammal. The recipient mouse was called “little” because it suffered from a form of
congenital dwarfism.
1988—Steven Rosenberg: Rosenberg and his colleagues were given approval to perform
the first gene transfer experiment in human patients suffering from metastatic
melanoma. This experiment represented genetic tracking with the marker gene NeoR
and not gene therapy. 
1990—W. French Anderson, Michael Blaese, Kenneth Culver: At 12:52 p.m. on Friday,
September 14, 1990 at the National Cancer Institute, a four year old girl, Ashanthi De
Silva from Cleveland, Ohio, became the first human gene-therapy patient. She was
infused with her own white blood cells carrying the corrected version of the adenosine
deaminase (ADA) gene. Drs. Anderson, Blaese and Culver did not expect meaningful
results from the experiment for about 1 year. A second girl, Cynthia Cutshall, was 
similarly injected in 1990. Reports in June 1993 showed the two girls with smiles and
childish energy, playing in a school yard. Both girls’ immune systems were working
effectively.
1994—Other gene therapy candidates include sickle cell anemia, hemophilia, diabetes, 
cancer, and heart disease patients. Germ line gene therapy is debated during meeting
of the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee. By 1996 a growing number of proposals
await review by the Human Gene Therapy Subcommittee of the Recombinant DNA
Advisory Committee.
54
APPENDIX A
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested