itextsharp add annotation to existing pdf c# : Add url link to pdf application control cloud windows azure winforms class 16600336-part1799

1995—Led by J. Craig Venter, a group at The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) in
Maryland, published the full gene sequence of the bacterium 
Hemophilus influenzae,
a
landmark in microbiological research as the first free-living organism whose genetic
“blueprint” was decoded.  
1996—A multinational collaboration including more than 100 laboratories from Europe,
USA, Canada, and Japan was the first to unravel the entire genome sequence of a
eukaryote, the yeast 
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
S. cerevisiae
is a commercially 
significant yeast commonly used in baking and in fermentation of alcoholic beverages
and is widely used in the laboratory as a model organism for understanding cellular and
molecular processes of eukaryotes.
1997—Scientists led by Ian Wilmut at Scotland’s Roslin Institute reported the successful
cloning of a sheep, named Dolly, from the cell of an adult udder cell. The cloning of
Dolly sparked international debate about ethical and moral issues concerning cloning.
Subsequently, scientists at Scotland’s Roslin Institute, in collaboration with Scotland-
based PPL Therapeutics, successfully cloned two genetically modified lambs, named
Polly and Molly, that were genetically modified with a human gene so that their milk
contained a protein called factor IX, a blood-clotting protein that can be extracted and
used in treating human hemophilia.
1998—Over 99% of the genome sequence of the first multicellular organism, the tiny
roundworm 
Caenorhabditis elegans
, was reported. Although 
C. elegans
is a primitive
organism, it shares many of its essential genetic and biological characteristics with
humans and may help scientists identify and characterize the genes involved in human
biology and disease.  
Scientists produced a detailed and accurate physical map, or location, for most of the
30,000 known human genes, a milestone for the Human Genome Project.  
2000—A team led by Ingo Potrykus of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich
and Peter Beyer of the University of Freiburg in Germany reported the creation of
genetically modified rice called “golden rice”, which can produce large amounts of 
beta-carotene, a substance that human beings can turn into Vitamin A. “Golden rice”
could alleviate blindness caused by vitamin A deficiency in millions of poverty-stricken
people around the world.
The genome sequence of the fruit fly 
Drosophila melanogaster
was published through
a collaboration between a private company, Celera Genomics, and researchers 
worldwide studying the fruit fly.  
D. melanogaster
, a model widely used in the laboratory,
is the largest animal so far to have its genetic code deciphered.  
A rough draft of the human genome was completed by a team of 16 international 
institutions that form the Human Genome Sequencing Consortium. Researchers at
Celera Genomics also announced completion of their ‘first assembly’ of the genome.  
55
APPENDIX A
Add url link to pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink to pdf in; adding a link to a pdf
Add url link to pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding links to pdf; adding hyperlinks to pdf documents
2001—On February 12, 2001, Celera Genomics and the International Human Genome
Sequencing Consortium jointly announced the publishing of the nearly complete
sequence of the human genome - the genetic “blueprint” for a human being. This
accomplishment took the international team almost twenty years and involved the 
collaboration of thousands of scientists from around the world. Celera Genomics reported
completing the work in approximately nine months. The two groups differed in their 
estimates for the number of genes in the human genome, but the range predicted by
both groups, between 25,000 and 40,000 genes, is far fewer than the previous estimate
of 100,000 genes. This unexpected finding suggested that an organism as complex as
a human being can be made of so few genes, only twice as many as found in the worm
C
elegans
or the fly 
D. melanogaster
. The unveiling of the full sequence of the human
genome makes it possible for researchers all over the world to begin developing 
treatments for many diseases. 
President George Bush decided that only experiments involving the existing 64 embryonic
stem cell lines would be eligible for possible federal funding. The president’s decision
was disappointing to many scientists who hoped to use embryonic stem cells to develop
treatments for many ailments.
Advanced Cell Technology, a small company in Massachusetts, announced that it had
successfully cloned human embryos for the purpose of extracting their stem cells. This
method could ultimately be used to treat patients with a variety of diseases by making
replacement cells, such as nerve and muscle cells, which can be transplanted back into
same person without the risk of being rejected by the body.  
PPL Therapeutics, the company that helped to clone Dolly the sheep, announced that it
had cloned five genetically modified piglets with an inactivated, or “knocked out”, gene
that would make their organs much less likely to be rejected when transplanted into a
human recipient. The success of PPL Therapeutics brings hope to the thousands of
people who are waiting to receive donated organs such as hearts, lungs, kidneys, and
livers.  
2002—Dolly the sheep, the first mammal to be cloned from an adult cell, developed arthritis
at a relatively early age of five years. It is not clear whether Dolly’s condition was the
result of a genetic defect caused by cloning, or whether it was a mere coincidence. The
news has renewed debates on whether cloned animals are susceptible to premature
aging and health problems and has also been a setback for those who argue that
cloning can be used to generate a supply of organs to help patients on the transplant
list.  
2008—Discovery and landmark developmental uses of GFP wins the Nobel Prize in
Chemistry. Osamu Shimonura was the first to isolate GFP and found that it had 
fluorescent properties when exposed to UV light. Martin Chalfie used GFP as a luminous
genetic tag. Roger Y. Tsien uncovered GFP's fluorescent mechanism.
56
APPENDIX A
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark. C#.NET: Edit PDF Metadata. PDF SDK for .NET allows you to read, add, edit, update
add hyperlink to pdf; add links to pdf
C#: How to Add HTML5 Document Viewer Control to Your Web Page
type="text/css"/> <link rel="stylesheet _viewerTopToolbar.addTab(_tabRedact); //add Tab "Sample customStyle({ background: "url('RasterEdge_Resource_Files/images
pdf links; c# read pdf from url
Appendix B
Glossary of Terms
Agar
A gelatinous substance derived from seaweed. Provides a solid
matrix to support bacterial growth. Contains nutrient mixture of
carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleotides, salts, and vitamins.
Antibiotic Selection
Use of an antibiotic to select bacteria containing the DNA of interest.
The pGLO plasmid DNA contains the gene for beta-lactamase that 
provides resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin. Once bacteria are 
transformed with the pGLO plasmid, they begin producing and secreting
beta-lactamaseprotein. Secreted beta-lactamase breaks down 
ampicillin, rendering the antibiotic harmless to the bacterial host. Only
bacteria containing the pGLO plasmid can grow and form colonies in
nutrient medium containing ampicillin, while untransformed cells that
have not taken up the pGLO plasmid cannot grow on the ampicillin
selection plates.
Arabinose
A carbohydrate isolated from plants that is normally used as
source of food by bacteria. In this experiment, arabinose initiates
transcription of the GFP gene resulting in fluorescent green cells
under UV light.
Beta-Lactamase
Beta-lactamase is a protein that provides resistance to the antibiotic
ampicillin. The beta-lactamase protein is producedand secreted by
bacteria that have been transformedwith a plasmid containing the
gene for beta-lactamase. The secreted beta-lactamase inactivates
the ampicillin present in the LB nutrient agar, which allows for 
bacterial growth and expression of newly acquired genes also 
contained on the plasmid, such as GFP.
Biotechnology
Applying biology in the real world by the specific manipulation of 
living organisms, especially at the genetic level, to produce 
potentially beneficial products.
Cloning
Cloning is the process of generating virtually endless copies or
clones of an organism or segment of DNA. Cloning produces a
population that has an identical genetic makeup.
Colony
A clump of genetically identical bacterial cells growing on an agar
plate. Because all the cells in a single colony are genetically identical,
they are called clones.
Culture Media
The liquid and solid media referred to as LB (named after Luria and
Bertani) broth and agar are made from an extract of yeast and an
enzymatic digest of meat byproductswhich provide a mixture of 
carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleotides, salts, and vitamins, all of
which are nutrients for bacterial growth. Agar, which is from seaweed,
polymerizes when heated and cooled to form a solid gel (similar to
Jell-O gelatin), and functions to provide a solid support on which to
culture the bacteria.
Genetic Engineering
The manipulation of an organism’s genetic material (DNA) by
introducing or eliminating specific genes.
57
APPENDIX B
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Download and Save Image from Web URL
to download image from website link more easily from image downloading from web URL, RasterEdge .NET powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add url link to pdf; add a link to a pdf in acrobat
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
add a link to a pdf; add url to pdf
Gene Regulation
Gene expression in all organisms is carefully regulated to
allow for differing conditions and to prevent wasteful 
overproduction of unneeded proteins. The genes involved
in the transport and breakdown of food are good examples
of highly regulated genes. For example, the simple sugar,
arabinose, can be used as a source of energy and carbon
by bacteria. The bacterial enzymes that are needed to
break down or digest arabinose for food are only
expressed in the absence of arabinose but are expressed
when arabinose is present in the environment. In other
words when arabinose is around, the genes for these
digestive enzymes are turned on. When arabinose runs out
these genes are turned back off. See Appendix D for a
more detailed explanation of the role that arabinose
plays in the regulation and expression of the Green
Fluorescent Protein gene.
Green Fluorescent Protein
Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally isolated
from the bioluminescent jellyfish, 
Aequorea victoria
.The
gene for GFP has recently been cloned. The unique
three-dimensional conformation of GFP causes it to 
resonate when exposed to ultraviolet light and give off
energy in the form of visible green light. When exposed to
UV light, the electrons in GFP's chromophore are excited
to a higher energy state. When they drop down to a lower
energy state, they emit a longer wavelength of visible
fluorescent green light at ~509 nm.
Plasmid
A circular DNA molecule, capable of self-replicating, 
carrying one or more genes for antibiotic resistance 
proteins and a cloned foreign gene such as GFP. It is an
extra-chromosomal DNA molecule separate from the
chromosomal DNA. Plasmids usually occur naturally in
bacteria.
pGLO
Plasmid containing the Green Fluorescent Protein gene
sequence and ampicillin resistance gene, which codes for
beta-lactamase.
Recombinant DNA 
The process of cutting and recombining DNA fragments
Technology
as a means to isolate genes or to alter their structure and
function.
Screening
Process of identifying wanted bacteria from a bacterial
library.
Sterile Technique
Minimizing the possibility of outside bacterial 
contamination during an experiment through 
observance of cleanliness and using careful laboratory
techniques.
Streaking
Process of passing an inoculating loop with bacteria on it
across an agar plate in quadrants with the intent of 
generating single colonies.
Vector
An autonomously replicating DNA molecule, such as a
plasmid, into which foreign DNA fragments are inserted
and then propagated in a host cell.
58
APPENDIX B
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark
add hyperlink pdf; add hyperlink pdf file
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
add hyperlink pdf document; add hyperlink to pdf in
Appendix C
Basic Molecular Biology Concepts and Terminology
A study of the living world reveals that all living organisms organize themselves in some
unique fashion. A detailed blueprint of this organization is passed on to offspring.
Cells are the smallest functional units capable of independent reproduction. Many 
bacteria, for instance, can survive as single cells. The chemical molecules within each cell
are organized to perform in concert.
Cells can be grown in culture and harvested
Cell culture is the process by which cells can be gathered from their natural locations and
grown inside laboratory containers under controlled conditions. Appropriate food and 
environment must be provided for the cells to grow. Bacteria and yeast are very easy to
grow in culture. Cells taken from plants, insects and animals can also be grown, but are
more difficult to care for.
After growth is complete, cells in culture can be harvested and studied.
Cloning
When a population of cells is prepared by growth from a single cell, all the cells in the 
population will be genetically identical. Such a population is called clonal. The process of
creating a clonal population is called cloning. The purpose of streaking bacteria on agar is
to generate single colonies, each arising from a single cell.
Looking inside cells
The molecules inside a cell each perform a given function. For instance, DNA
molecules store information (like the hard drive in a computer). Proteins are the workhorses
of the cell.
To study these molecules we prepare a clonal population from a cell type of interest,
break open the cells and sort the contents. For instance, it is fairly easy to separate all the 
proteins from all the DNA molecules.
Purifying a single species of protein out of the mixture of proteins found inside a cell
type is also possible. Each type of protein has unique physical and chemical properties.
These properties allow the separation of protein species based on size, charge, or
hydrophobicity, for instance.
Special molecules, specialized functions
We will take a close look at three very special kinds of molecules found inside cells:
DNA, RNA and proteins. Each of these molecules performs a different function. DNA
molecules are like file cabinets in which information is stored. RNA helps to retrieve and
execute the instructions which are stored in DNA. Proteins are designed to perform
chemical chores inside (and often outside) the cell.
DNA—The universal template for biological information
The master script for each organism is encoded within its deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA).
The information within the DNA molecule/s of each cell is sufficient to initiate every function
that cell will perform.
DNA molecules are very long chains composed of repeating subunits. Each subunit
(nucleotide) contains one of four possible bases protruding from its side:
adenine (A) 
cytosine (C)
thymine (T)
guanine (G)
59
APPENDIX C
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note.
add hyperlink to pdf in preview; add links to pdf document
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Note
pdf link to email; add links to pdf online
Since nucleotides are joined head-to-tail, a long strand of DNA essentially consists of a
chemical backbone with bases protruding along its side. The information carried by this
molecule is encoded in the sequence of the bases A, G, C, and T along its length.
Some further points to note about DNA structure
1.   Because the subunits of DNA chains are joined head-to-tail, the sequence is directional.
By convention, we write DNA sequence from the free 5' (pronounced "5 prime") end of
the backbone and work our way toward the other end, the "3 prime" end, or 3'.
i.e.
5'...AACTG...3'
2. The protruding bases along the chain are free to form spontaneous hydrogen bonds
with available bases on other DNA strands according to the following rules:
(i)       A pairs with T
(ii)      C pairs with G
Because of these rules, A and T are said to be complementary bases; G and C are
also complementary.
(iii)      For two DNA strands to pair up, they must be complementary and
run in opposite directions. 
i.e.
(5'...AGGTC...3') can pair with (5'...GACCT...3'). These two strands have 
complementary sequences. The double-stranded pair is written as follows:
5'...AGGTC...3'
3'...TCCAG...5'
The above molecule contains five base pairs. Indeed, in nature, DNA almost always
occurs in double-stranded form with the two strands containing complementary
sequences.
3. DNA molecules are typically thousands, sometimes millions of base pairs long.
Sometimes the two ends of a DNA molecule are joined to form circular DNA.
4. Double-stranded DNA, in its native form, occurs as a coiled spring, or helix. Because it
is two-stranded, it is often referred to as a double helix.
The architecture of DNA allows for a very simple strategy during reproduction: The two
strands of each DNA molecule unwind and "unzip"; then, each strand allows a new com-
plementary copy of itself to be made by an enzyme called DNA polymerase. This results in
two daughter molecules, each double-stranded, and each identical to the parent molecule.
Proteins and RNA are the workhorses of the cell
The biochemistry of life requires hundreds of very specific and efficient chemical
interactions, all happening simultaneously. The major players in these interactions are
short-lived protein and RNA molecules which can work together or independently to
serve a variety of functions. Like DNA, RNA and proteins are also long chains of 
repeating units.
RNA
RNA (ribonucleic acid), like DNA, consists of four types of building blocks strung together
in a chain. It differs from DNA in the following respects:
60
APPENDIX C
The four bases in RNA are A, G, C, and U (uracil); the pairing rules are the same as for
DNA except that A pairs with U. Although RNA can pair with complementary RNA or DNA,
in cells RNA is usually single-stranded. The sugar in the RNA backbone is ribose, not
deoxyribose. RNA molecules are generally short, compared to DNA molecules; this is
because each RNA is itself a copy of a short segment from a DNA molecule. The process
of copying segments of DNA into RNA is called transcription, and is performed by a protein
called RNA polymerase.
Proteins
Proteins (more precisely, polypeptides) are also long, chain-like molecules but are more
structurally diverse than either DNA or RNA. This is because the subunits of proteins, called
amino acids, come in twenty different types. The exact sequence of amino acids along a
polypeptide chain determines how that chain will fold into its three-dimensional structure.
The precise three-dimensional features of this structure, in turn, determine its function.
What a protein will do depends on the exact sequenceof its amino acids.
In most cases, a protein will perform a single function. Very diverse functions can
be performed by proteins: Some proteins, called enzymes, act as catalysts in chemical
reactions; some carry signals from one part of a cell to another—or, in the case of
“hormones”, from one cell to another; some proteins (antibodies) have the task of 
fighting intruders; many become integral parts of the various physical structures inside
cells; and still others (regulatory proteins) police various activities within cells so as to
keep them within “legal” limits.
Linear code, three-dimensional consequences
DNA is the primary depot for information in living systems. As mentioned, this 
information is linear, 
i.e.
, encoded in the sequence of A, G, C, T building blocks along
the DNA molecule. This linear code can be passed on to offspring—because DNA can
be replicated in exact copies.
Short segments of each DNA molecule are chosen for transcription at any given time.
These segments are called genes. The enzyme, RNA polymerase, copies the entire 
segment, base by base, assembling an RNA molecule which contains a sequence of 
A, G, C and U exactly complementary to the DNA sequence of the transcribed gene.
In addition to providing a master template for copying RNAs, DNA also contains
sequence information which tells the RNA polymerase where to start transcribing a gene
(promoter) and where to stop, how many copies it should make and when, and it can
even embed certain information within the RNA sequence to determine the longevity and
productivity of that RNA.
There are three major classes of RNAs copied off DNA templates: messenger RNAs,
or mRNAs, which relay the sequence information required for assembling proteins; transfer
RNAs, or tRNAs, which work in the assembly line for proteins; and RNAs which perform
structural functions. For example, ribosomal RNAs, or rRNAs, help build the scaffolding for
ribosomes, the factories where proteins are assembled.
mRNAs carry the sequence information for making proteins. Ribosomes read this
sequence of nucleotides, by a process called “translation”, into a sequence of amino acids.
How is this accomplished? There are only four kinds of nucleotides, but twenty kinds of
amino acids.
During translation, the ribosome reads 3 nucleotides at a time and assigns an amino
acid to each successive triplet. Note: Triplets are often referred to as codons. Each amino
acid is then attached to the end of the growing protein chain. There are 64 possible triplets,
61
APPENDIX C
or codons. Thus, the linear information residing in DNA is used to assemble a linear
sequence of amino acids in a protein. This sequence, in turn, will determine the way that
protein will fold into a precise shape with characteristic chemical properties.
In summary, the primary transfer of information within cells follows the order:
DNA➜RNA➜PROTEIN➜TRAIT
Although the information itself is linear, the implications are three-dimensional. A 
fundamental assumption of recombinant DNA technology is that permanent and desirable
changes in the functioning of living cells can be accomplished by changing the linear
sequence of their DNA.
Genes are discrete files of DNA information
A gene is a segment within a DNA molecule singled out for copying into RNA. Directly
or indirectly, this RNA will perform a function. It is convenient to think of a gene, therefore,
as a unit of function.
Many traits, such as bacterial resistance to an antibiotic, are governed by single genes.
Most traits—such as the color of a rose, or the shape of a nose—are governed by several
genes acting in concert.
Genes can vary in length: Some are only a few hundred base pairs long; some can be
tens of thousands of base pairs long. A DNA molecule may carry from a handful to 
thousands of genes. A cell, in turn, may contain one or several DNA molecules 
(chromosomes). Thus the number of genes in a cell can vary greatly. 
E. coli
, a bacterium,
contains one DNA molecule with about 5,000 genes on it. A human cell contains 46 DNA
molecules carrying a total of about 100,000 genes.
All genes in a given cell are not copied into RNA (
i.e.
“expressed”) at the same time or
at the same rate. Thus, when speaking of gene function, one refers to its expression level.
This rate can be controlled by the cell, according to predetermined rules which are 
themselves written into the DNA.
An example: The cells in our bodies (all 100 trillion of them) each contain identical DNA
molecules. Yet liver cells, for example, express only those genes required for liver function,
whereas skin cells express a quite different subset of genes.
DNA can be cut into pieces with restriction enzymes
Restriction enzymes are proteins made by bacteria as a defense against foreign,
invading DNA (for example, viral DNA). Each restriction enzyme recognizes a unique
sequence of typically 4–6 base pairs, and will cut any DNA whenever that sequence
occurs.
For example, the restriction enzyme 
Bam
H I recognizes the sequence
(5'..GGATCC..3') and cuts the DNA strand between the two G nucleotides in that
sequence.
Restriction enzymes will cut DNA from any source, provided the recognition sequence
is present. It does not matter if the DNA is of bacterial, plant or human origin.
62
APPENDIX C
Pieces of DNA can be joined by DNA ligase
DNA ligase is an enzyme that glues pieces of DNA together, provided the ends are
compatible.
Thus, a piece of human or frog or tomato DNA cut with 
Bam
H I can be easily joined to
a piece of bacterial DNA also cut with 
Bam
H I. This allows the creation of recombinant
DNAs, or hybrids, created by joining pieces of DNA from two different sources.
Genes can be cut out of human DNA or plant DNA, and placed inside bacteria. For 
example, the human gene for the hormone insulin can be put into bacteria. Under the right 
conditions, these bacteria can make authentic human insulin.
Plasmids are small circular pieces of DNA
Plasmids are small circular DNAs found inside some bacterial cells. They replicate their
own DNA by borrowing the cells’ polymerases. Thus they can persist indefinitely inside
cells without doing very much work of their own.
Because of their small size, plasmid DNAs are easy to extract and purify from bacterial
cells. When cut with a restriction enzyme, they can be joined to foreign DNAs—from any
source—which have been cut with the same enzyme.
The resulting hybrid DNAs can be reintroduced into bacterial cells by a procedure
called transformation. Now the hybrid plasmids can perpetuate themselves in the bacteria
just as before except that the foreign DNA which was joined to it is also being perpetuated.
The foreign DNA gets a free ride, so to speak.
Every hybrid plasmid now contains a perfect copy of the piece of foreign DNA originally
joined to it. We say that foreign piece of DNA has been cloned; the plasmid which carried
the foreign DNA is called a cloning vehicle or vector.
In addition to their usefulness for cloning foreign genes, plasmids sometimes carry
genes of their own. Bacteria die when exposed to antibiotics. However, antibiotic-resis-
tance genes allow bacteria to grow in the presence of an antibiotic such as ampicillin. Such
genes are often found on plasmids. When foreign DNA is inserted into such plasmids, and
the hybrids introduced into bacterial cells by transformation, it is easy to select those 
bacteria that have received the plasmid—because they have acquired the ability to grow in
the presence of the antibiotic, whereas all other bacterial cells are killed.
DNA libraries
When DNA is extracted from a given cell type, it can be cut into pieces and the pieces
can be cloned en masse into a population of plasmids. This process produces a population
of hybrid (recombinant) DNAs. After introducing these hybrids back into cells, each 
transformed cell will have received and propagated one unique hybrid. Every hybrid will
contain the same vector DNA but a different insert DNA.
If there are 1,000 different DNA molecules in the original mixture, 1,000 different
hybrids will be formed; 1,000 different transformant cells will be recovered, each carrying
one of the original 1,000 pieces of genetic information. Such a collection is called a DNA
library. If the original extract came from human cells, the library is a human library.
Individual DNAs of interest can be fished out of such a library by screening the library
with an appropriate probe.
63
APPENDIX C
Appendix D 
Gene Regulation
Our bodies contain thousands of different proteins which perform many different jobs.
Digestive enzymes are proteins; some of the hormone signals that run through our bodies
and the antibodies protecting us from disease are proteins. The information for assembling
a protein is carried in our DNA. The section of DNA which contains the code for making a
protein is called a gene. There are over 30,000–100,000 genes in the human genome.
Each gene codes for a unique protein: one gene, one protein. The gene that codes for a
digestive enzyme in your mouth is different from one that codes for an antibody or the 
pigment that colors your eyes.  
Organisms regulate expression of their genes and ultimately the amounts and kinds of
proteins present within their cells for a myriad of reasons, including developmental changes,
cellular specialization, and adaptation to the environment. Gene regulation not only allows for
adaptation to differing conditions, but also prevents wasteful overproduction of unneeded 
proteins which would put the organism at a competitive disadvantage. The genes involved in
the transport and breakdown (catabolism) of food are good examples of highly regulated
genes. For example, the sugar arabinose is both a source of energy and a source of carbon.
E. coli 
bacteria produce three enzymes (proteins) needed to digest arabinose as a food
source. The genes which code for these enzymes are not expressed when arabinose is
absent, but they are expressed when arabinose is present in their environment. How is this
so?
Regulation of the expression of proteins often occurs at the level of transcription from
DNA into RNA. This regulation takes place at a very specific location on the DNA template,
called a promoter, where RNA polymerase sits down on the DNA and begins transcription of
the gene. In bacteria, groups of related genes are often clustered together and transcribed
into RNA from one promoter. These clusters of genes controlled by a single promoter are
called operons.  
The three genes (
araB, araA 
and
araD
) that code for three digestive enzymes involved in
the breakdown of arabinose are clustered together in what is known as the arabinose
operon.3 These three proteins are dependent on initiation of transcription from a single 
promoter, P
BAD
. Transcription of these three genes requires the simultaneous presence of the
DNA template (promoter and operon), RNA polymerase, a DNA binding protein called 
araC
and arabinose. 
araC
binds to the DNA at the binding site for the RNA polymerase (the 
beginning of the arabinose operon). When arabinose is present in the environment, bacteria
take it up. Once inside, the arabinose interacts directly with 
araC
which is bound to the DNA.
The interaction causes 
araC
to change its shape which in turn promotes (actually helps) the
binding of RNA polymerase and the three genes 
araB
A
and 
D
, are transcribed. Three
enzymes are produced, they break down arabinose, and eventually the arabinose runs out.
In the absence of arabinose the 
araC
returns to its original shape and transcription is shut off.
The DNA code of the pGLO plasmid has been engineered to incorporate aspects of the
arabinose operon. Both the promoter (P
BAD
) and the 
araC
gene are present. However, the
genes which code for arabinose catabolism, 
araB, A 
and
D
, have been replaced by the 
single gene which codes for GFP. Therefore, in the presence of arabinose, 
araC
protein 
promotes the binding of RNA polymerase and GFP is produced. Cells fluoresce brilliant
green as they produce more and more GFP. In the absence of arabinose, 
araC
no longer
facilitates the binding of RNA polymerase and the GFP gene is not transcribed. When GFP
is not made, bacteria colonies will appear to have a wild-type (natural) phenotype—of white
colonies with no fluorescence.  
This is an excellent example of the central molecular framework of biology in action:  
DNA➜RNA➜PROTEIN➜TRAIT.
64
APPENDIX D
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested